HIV/AIDS

Hispanic or Latino Americans Diagnosed with HIV Nearly Three Times as Often as Whites

By Jay Jordan

A new study published in the CDC’s Oct 12, 2012 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report has found that Hispanic or Latino Americans are diagnosed with HIV infection nearly three times as often as whites, with particularly high HIV rates among Hispanics in the Northeast.

Researchers at the CDC analyzed 2010 data from 46 states and Puerto Rico and found that 10,731 new HIV diagnoses were made among Hispanics or Latinos in 2010. The rate of HIV diagnoses among Hispanics or Latinos living in the Northeast were 55 per 100,000 people, more than twice other regions.

Male-to-male sex was the primary transmission method for Hispanics or Latinos overall, but those in the Northeast were more likely to have become infected through injection drug use than Hispanics living in other regions. Those living in Puerto Rico were more likely to have become infected through injection drug use or sex with a person of the opposite sex.

“HIV interventions should be tailored to different populations in different geographic areas,” the study’s authors write. “Regionally specific HIV prevention efforts should be used to increase early diagnosis and linkage to care for Hispanics and Latinos.”