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Around the Gym: Put some beef on your buns

By Paul E. Pratt

"I like big butts and I cannot lie!"

In his 1995 chart-topper "Baby Got Back," Sir Mix-a-Lot declared his love for bountiful booties—and he's not alone! While most men enjoy bigger backsides, not everyone has ample and well-proportioned buns.

Is a big behind something you have to be born with? Why is a beefy butt so hard to achieve? Are there secrets to defined derrieres? Is a hard butt better than a naturally round one?

Here four RealJocks gloat about their glutes and talk about one of their best … assets. Find out their keys to better buttocks.

Marco Klon, 19
I started out with an OK body, but working out helps. I don't understand why men don't have butts. I'd want one if I didn't have one. I think you can develop a butt, if you really want to. I run a lot —usually about eight miles a day —and stairmaster. If you don't have one, doing squats and lunges really helps. If somebody wanted to develop a butt, I'd say definitely go jogging. The biggest benefit is you can fit into Diesel jeans really well. You just look better when you're wearing clothes—and when you're not wearing clothes!

Jair Oliviera, 25
If you work really hard, you can develop a butt, but you do have to eat right and do the right exercises. A lot of people, when they do butt, they work their legs and butt however they think they should. You really have to work the right muscles. It helps to get a personal trainer. I know a lot of people from my home in Brazil, and they don't have any butt. There are a few people who are lucky and have the genetics, but everyone else has to work for it. In Brazil, we say "Eat a lot of candy," because the sugar goes to your butt. Really, I had a personal trainer who showed me how to do the right exercises and hit the right muscles. And, of course, I do eat a lot of candy!

Matthew Lindsey, 26
It's probably a combination of the two. If you're predisposed genetically to having a well-developed butt, you don't have to work so hard to cultivate one. You definitely have to work. It's not like calf muscles. There are a lot of people who have never been inside a gym have great calf muscles. You can do lots of exercises for calf muscles. People who don't ever workout at all can have huge calves. Before I started working out, people didn't notice my butt like they do now. They notice now, sometimes before they see my face! I concentrate a lot on legwork. I actually like working on my legs, where other people find it a chore. I actually prefer guys who are a little bit slender on top but have great legs. Doing legwork automatically works your glutes. Diet probably plays a part in it. It's a fat deposit area. I do think that area does benefit from a healthy, regular diet.

Geoffrey Wood, 43
You can work on your butt to a point, but I think it's more genetic. I'm a personal trainer, so I look at body types rather than what's happening in the immediate present to the body. If a guy's relatively well worked out, and has nicely developed legs, he should also have a nice butt. You can't really work legs without working the butt. If they've got nice legs and no bootie, they probably don't have any to begin with. There's also a difference between someone with a nicely worked out, more firm butt and someone who has, let's say, more meat to the butt. J'Lo has a big, meaty bootie and Jean-Claude Van Dam has a muscle bootie. You can work something up from being flat, but you can't create something from nothing. That's why plastic surgeons are having a heydey right now!

ABOUT PAUL E. PRATT
Paul E. Pratt is an award-winning San Francisco-based freelance entertainment and features journalist. His work appears in over a dozen LGBT publications around the country.