STRENGTH TRAINING

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BOSU Tuck Jumps

By RealJock Staff

This exercise provided courtesy of Billy Polson, founder and co-owner of DIAKADI Body training gym, voted best personal training gym in San Francisco by CitySearch in 2006.

Benefits
Tuck jumps off a BOSU ball work every muscle in your legs—not only in the jump, but in the take-off and landing, in which you have to use stabilizing strength to balance. Start with low jumps off the ball to learn the balance portion of the exercise; as you improve, try to go for a true tuck, jumping high and grasping the fronts of your knees with your hands at the top of the jump.

Muscles Worked
Legs

Starting Position
Stand upright on the round side of a BOSU ball, with your feet hip-width apart and arms straight overhead (see Photo 1).

Exercise

  1. From the starting position, sit your hips back and down in a modified squat. You want to go low enough to help generate thrust through your legs when you push off. Keep your arms overhead (see Photo 2).
  2. From the squat position, jump straight up into the air, pushing off hard with both legs as you bring your arms down. (If you haven't done this exercise before, start with simple low jumps off the ball without tucks to learn the balance portion of the exercise.) Try to jump as high as you can and achieve a true tuck—at the top of your jump, momentarily grab the fronts of your knees with both hands (see Photos 3 and 4).
  3. As you come back down, untuck your arms and bring them back overheard as you straighten your legs. Land with your knees somewhat bent, sitting into your landing to absorb the shock of the land. Return to a standing position to finish your first tuck jump (see Photos 5 and 6).
  4. Repeat the jump for 12 tucks, trying to bring your knees up high with each jump.
About Billy Polson: Billy Polson is the founder and co-owner of DIAKADI Body training gym, which was voted the best personal training gym in San Francisco by CitySearch in 2006. A competitive swimmer and triathlete in his own right, Polson has over 15 years of experience working as a coach and trainer, and was recently named by Men's Journal Magazine (December 2005) as one of the Top 100 Trainers in America.