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AIDS/LifeCycle 6 Training Program: Week 13

Welcome to week 13 of the RealJock.com 18-week AIDS/LifeCycle 6 training program. This build program will help get you ready for the seven-day, 545-mile bike ride from San Francisco to Los Angeles from June 3 - 9, 2007. The RealJock.com AIDS/LifeCycle 6 training program is provided by Richard Soriano, DPT, a veteran cyclist and director of the Action Sports Medicine in San Francisco.

Join RealJock.com at the AIDS/LifeCycle 6, June 3 – 9, 2007

  1. Learn more about AIDS/LifeCycle 6
  2. Register for AIDS/LifeCycle 6
  3. See other RealJock.com members who are signed up (sign in to view this link)
  4. Add yourself to the RealJock.com AIDS/LifeCycle attendees list (sign in to view this link)
Currently Available Training Weeks
  1. Week 1 Training
  2. Week 2 Training
  3. Week 3 Training
  4. Week 4 Training
  5. Week 5 Training
  6. Week 6 Training
  7. Week 7 Training
  8. Week 8 Training
  9. Week 9 Training
  10. Week 10 Training
  11. Week 11 Training
  12. Week 12 Training
  13. Week 13 Training
  14. Week 14 Training
  15. Week 15 Training
  16. Week 16 Training
  17. Week 17 Training
  18. Week 18 Training
Additional training weeks will be added regularly.

Important Notes on the Training
Be sure to read the important notes on the AIDS/LifeCycle training program and abbreviation key at the bottom of this page before you begin training—you'll be lost without them! You should pay particular attention to the heart rate training information.

WEEK 13 AIDS/LIFECYCLE TRAINING PROGRAM
Monday, April 23, 2007
Activity Type Minutes Goal Mileage Avg. Heart Rate (Goal AT HR) Avg. Heart Rate (Actual) Distance (Actual)
Gym Cardio GC 22 - 30 mins 3 - 5.5 miles 55 - 75%
Strength Train Focus on upper body and core training 30 - 45 mins N/A N/A
Tuesday, April 24, 2007
Activity Type Minutes Goal Mileage Avg. Heart Rate (Goal AT HR) Avg. Heart Rate (Actual) Distance (Actual)
Bike (indoor or outdoor) EM 35 - 50 mins 7 - 13 miles 55 - 75%
Wednesday, April 25, 2007
Activity Type Minutes Goal Mileage Avg. Heart Rate (Goal AT HR) Avg. Heart Rate (Actual) Distance (Actual)
Yoga Easy 20 - 30 mins N/A N/A
Swim Easy N/A 55 - 75% N/A
Thursday, April 26, 2007
Activity Type Minutes Goal Mileage Avg. Heart Rate (Goal AT HR) Avg. Heart Rate (Actual) Distance (Actual)
Bike EM 22 - 30 mins 4 - 8 miles 55 - 75%
Friday, April 27, 2007
Activity Type Minutes Goal Mileage Avg. Heart Rate (Goal AT HR) Avg. Heart Rate (Actual) Distance (Actual)
Stretch Light stretching 10 mins am/ 10 mins pm N/A N/A
Saturday, April 28, 2007
Activity Type Minutes Goal Mileage Avg. Heart Rate (Goal AT HR) Avg. Heart Rate (Actual) Distance (Actual)
Bike EM 2.75 - 3 hours 33 - 35 miles 55 - 75%
Sunday, April 29, 2007
Activity Type Minutes Goal Mileage Avg. Heart Rate (Goal AT HR) Avg. Heart Rate (Actual) Distance (Actual)
Hike / Walk Miderate pace 15 - 20 mins 3 - 4 miles 55 - 60%

ABBREVIATION KEY
Abbreviation Definition Objective
CR Climbing Repeat - Similar to steady state intervals, except done on a long steady climb. Stay within 75 to 80 percent of AT HR for the entire climb. Your pedal cadence should be 70 to 85 rpm. Increase your climbing lactate threshold.
EM Endurance Miles - Stay aerobic (55 to 75 percent of your AT HR) so you don't accumulate lactic acid. You should feel comfortable and be able to have a conversation as you ride. Build you aerobic capacity.
FP Fast Pedal - On a flat road, in a light gear, slowly increase your cadence while staying in the saddle and maintaining good technique until you are spinning at greater than 100 to 120 rpm. Hold steady for the full interval. Improve form and fast-twitch muscle firing.
GC Gym Cardio - Alternate cardiovascular exercise in gym for cross-training. Choose from the elliptical machine, stairmaster, rower, or treadmill. Stay aerobic at 55 to 75 percent of your AT HR. Strengthen muscles and joints, improve cardio, and prevent injury.
HA Hill Acceleration - On a long, moderate climb, pedal slowly until you reach the last 500 yds. Then gradually speed up so you’re nearly at AT HR. Start the interval during the last few yards of the hill, finishing out of the saddle at max effort. Improve hill climb reserve capacity.
HS Hill Sprint (Max) - Roll at a moderate speed in a moderate to light gear. As you approach the hill, jump out of the saddle and ride as hard as possible. Try to hold your top speed for the whole interval. Increase your power for acceleration.
PI Power Intervals - Bike at your maximum effort. Start with a relatively low gear, then push the pace to max effort and the highest cadence possible (100 to 110 rpm). Sustain this pace for the entire interval. Build gross power.
RBI Rest Between Intervals - The amount of time you rest between assigned intervals. Rest and recover.
SI Speed Interval (Max) - Ride at your maximium effort. Speed intervals are shorter than power intervals (PIs). Your cadence should be 110 rpm or more, maintaining proper riding form. Build gross power.
SS Steady State - Higher cadence, trying to maintain 85 to 95 rpm and higher intensity than tempo. Stay at 80 percent plus 3 beats per minute of AT HR. Improve ability to produce power at your lactate threshold.
Tempo Tempo - Objective is to maintain 80 percent of AT HR. Perform in a slightly larger gear, with cadence of about 70 to 75 rpm. Stay seated on climbs. Improve ability to produce power at your lactate threshold.
CALCULATING YOUR ANAEROBIC THRESHOLD HEART RATE (AT HR)
This training program is structured to improve your gross riding strength and stave off reaching your anaerobic threshold (AT) during your seven days of riding—especially during the last few days of the event when your reserves on climbs are deeply tested. The majority of your training will be done at a low to moderate pace, with some speed or power work included. Soriano recommends you use a heart rate monitor with the goal to train most of the time at an intensity at or below 75 percent of your anaerobic threshold heart rate (AT HR), also known as your lactate threshold.

The AT HR is the heart rate in exercise where oxygen consumption results in lactic acid production exceeding lactic acid removal, resulting in buildup of lactic acid in the muscles. By tracking your heart rate and staying within the training goals, you will train your body to consume fuel more efficiently while riding, enabling you to more efficiently ride and increase your chances of finishing each day's ride.

If you don't know your AT HR, check with your local gym or fitness professional to get an anaerobic threshold test to find your own personal heart rate numbers. This is important: The AIDS/LifeCycle is an endurance events, so you need to not only strengthen your heart, but also to train your body to burn more fat with carbohydrates so that you can go the distance.

Check out these AT HR resources below for a quick education:
  1. Anaerobic Threshold Defined
  2. Calculate Your Training Heart Rate Zones
A Simpler Calculation: Use your Max Aerobic Heart Rate
If you have trouble calculating your AT HR, you can also use a simpler calculation called your Max Aerobic Heart Rate. To calculate this rate, follow the instructions at Mark Allen Online. In this case, instead of using your AT HR, you would use your Max Aerobic Heart Rate for training. The numbers should be about the same. If they're not, use whichever number is lower.
NOTES ON THE 18-WEEK AIDS/LIFECYCLE 6 TRAINING PROGRAM
The RealJock triathlon training program is provided by Richard Soriano, DPT, a veteran cyclist and director of the Action Sports Medicine in San Francisco.
This program will help get you ready for seven straight days of road biking for a total of 545 miles in 18 weeks. Normally this training programs starts in October and therefore the base build-up is significantly more gradual. Soriano has adjusted the projected miles and hours of biking per week to safely get you ready in time for the event.

Only You Know Your Body and Fitness Level
Your fitness level may be lower, on par, or better than the expectations of this training program, so be sure to listen to your body and avoid over-use injuries. The AIDS/LifeCycle ride is not a race and therefore you should not worry about not being able to perform all of the planned intervals. This training program is purely structured to improve your gross riding strength and stave off reaching your anaerobic threshold (AT) during your seven days of riding—especially during the last few days of the event when your reserves on climbs are deeply tested.

Again, listen to your body! Your main focus in training should be to gradually log the miles and improve your overall endurance for the event.

Get in the Saddle
The best way to train your body for this event is to spend time in the bike saddle on the road. You should attempt to bike at least three times per week. If you are in good shape, a fourth day of biking would be appropriate on projected "gym" days.

Consult Your Doctor
As with any training endeavor, make sure you’ve consulted with your physician to ensure you’re clear to participate in such a progressively structured protocol.

Warm Up and Cool Down
Be sure to include time to warm-up before every training day for at least 10 to 15 minutes. Also allow 10 to 15 minutes for cool-down and stretching. If you don’t have one yet, use of a foam roller to do lower body self massages is highly recommended.

Have Fun!
The most important to remember when you train for the AIDS/LifeCycle 6 is to have as much fun as possible. Remember the following:
  1. This is not a competitive event.
  2. You're raising money for a great cause.
  3. You're getting ready for the ride of your life. Enjoy it!
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