Bench press: (Shoulders fatigued)

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 05, 2008 7:05 PM GMT
    I have been doing bench presses for at least 6 months combined with push ups. Just yesterday I decided to add more weight and I noticed that my shoulders were getting really tired and soar instead of my chest.

    I wanted to ask, Is it normal for your shoulders to get tired? or is it because of adding more weight? Maybe my position was not correct.

    Any advice would be great. Thanks!
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    Feb 05, 2008 7:56 PM GMT
    try widening your grip
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    Feb 05, 2008 8:03 PM GMT
    I imagine there will be plenty of people who disagree with me on this. But I found that when starting out isolating my chest was helpful in doing bench presses with a productive amount of weight and with good form. I liked the peck deck machine over the fly machine.
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    Feb 05, 2008 8:12 PM GMT
    If you roll your shoulders forward at the top of the pressing movement then you are recruiting front delts and risking injury. This is a common mistake when pressing weights toward the heavy end of one's abilities because we exhaust our pecs and use anything that's left to get the weight up. Heavy is good, but don't sacrifice form.

    As for widening the grip: I find this places more stress on front delts, not less. Maybe that's just me, though.
  • auryn

    Posts: 2061

    Feb 05, 2008 8:14 PM GMT
    Treatment Massage and rest a bit. Depending on how you were and have been lifting, it is possible to tire out your shoulders. Keep in mind that, eventhough you're working on your chest, your shoulder muscles are active. So it's likely that you may have overworked other muscles.

    Not knowing exactly where it hurts, and when, I can't say if it's all muscle or ligament or what, so have a Massage Therapist take a look at it and work on helping you heal.
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    Feb 05, 2008 8:21 PM GMT
    Hey, since you're somewhat new to weight lifting, it might be that the muscles in your chest are getting stronger faster than the connective tissue (tendons and ligaments) of your shoulder joint can keep up with. There's nothing unusual about that. It just takes that tissue longer to respond to strengthening. You might need to give your shoulder time to catch up so you don't risk injuring yourself.

    Just make sure you're using weight that allows you to keep proper form...form is more important than weight.
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    Feb 05, 2008 9:02 PM GMT
    sounds more likely the order of yur routine and pre exhausting other muscles
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    Feb 05, 2008 9:11 PM GMT
    Sweet! to all who responded thanks for the advice! will have to pay more attention if I am keeping my posture lined correctly.

    Seapower, seems you hit the spot to what is going on with my workout.

    You guys keep it real icon_biggrin.gif
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    Feb 05, 2008 9:12 PM GMT
    Sometimes it helps to really think about and observe the muscles involved as you lift to figure out exactly what each muscle is doing within the range of motion. Too often people concentrate on the moving of the weight rather than "how" they are moving it.
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    Feb 05, 2008 9:15 PM GMT
    MunchingZombie saidI imagine there will be plenty of people who disagree with me on this. But I found that when starting out isolating my chest was helpful in doing bench presses with a productive amount of weight and with good form. I liked the peck deck machine over the fly machine.


    Unfortunately, I do not go to a gym! icon_sad.gif
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    Feb 05, 2008 10:19 PM GMT
    For chest, I prefer to use dumb bells for a couple reasons. It helps build stabilizer muscles which you'll need for heavier weights. I feel safer doing them without a spotter. You also get more control on how you put you push and allows for twisting.

    You won't be able to do as much weight, but it is a good way to switch things up.
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    Feb 05, 2008 11:25 PM GMT
    milkdog saidFor chest, I prefer to use dumb bells for a couple reasons. It helps build stabilizer muscles which you'll need for heavier weights. I feel safer doing them without a spotter. You also get more control on how you put you push and allows for twisting.

    You won't be able to do as much weight, but it is a good way to switch things up.


    Thank you!!!
  • dionysus

    Posts: 420

    Feb 06, 2008 2:08 PM GMT
    buy little 5 pound weights.

    a similar problem happened to me, but it resulted in pinching at the shoulders, just make sure you're keeping your rotator cuff nice and studded out, its probably the most injured part on anyone's body since all psycho gym goers like to bench press more than sex.

    this might help, just throwing it out there. grab the 5-10 lb dumbbells or plates or whatever you want and keeping your arms perfectly straight make little circles when you hit the top of a lateral raise (so you're basically a huge T and you're making little circles).