GMAT

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    Jun 27, 2010 9:44 PM GMT
    I know that because of my pics I don't seem educated or what not... however, I decided to matriculate myself into grad school (or try to at least). I want to receive my Master's degree in finance. The first thing I need to do is take my GMAT. I know very little about this exam. Do you guys think I should sign myself up for a prep course? If so, which? Do you think it would be worth it or have you yourself gone through a prep course of any kind to help you in the GMAT?


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    Jun 27, 2010 11:17 PM GMT
    I took a prep course for the LSAT. I never would have gotten into law school without the prep course.
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    Jun 27, 2010 11:23 PM GMT
    I took a test prep course through a company called Kaplan. It made my score go way up. I actually am in the midst of doing my MBA right now. So, I would def recommend u taking a test prep course.


    Of course, ther's always the online practice tests u can take
  • tgrissom0312

    Posts: 91

    Jun 27, 2010 11:34 PM GMT
    If you have the cash then I would highly suggest the Kaplan class. It could possibly raise your score 75 to 100 points.

    Totally worth the money.
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    Jun 27, 2010 11:43 PM GMT


    I work for Pearson VUE, the company that administers both the GMAT and the Kaplan-GMAT Experience.

    Every single candidate that took the Kaplan first, has said they were REALLY glad they did, and how much it helped to prepare them for the actual GMAT.

    So, there you have it.
  • nicelyproport...

    Posts: 573

    Jun 28, 2010 2:04 PM GMT
    I actually tutor students preparing for the GMAT.

    Like most standardized tests, the GMAT assesses to a large degree how well you take the test. You could be great at math and verbal and still not get a stellar score if you're not prepared and don't know to approach the test effectively and efficiently.

    Please feel free to PM me.

    P.S. And to answer a question that I'm often asked: No, I don't offer clothing-optional tutoring sessions. (Though I'm toying with the idea of instituting Shirtless Fridays.)
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    Jun 28, 2010 2:09 PM GMT
    Aggieboy saidI know that because of my pics I don't seem educated or what not... however, I decided to matriculate myself into grad school (or try to at least). I want to receive my Master's degree in finance. The first thing I need to do is take my GMAT. I know very little about this exam. Do you guys think I should sign myself up for a prep course? If so, which? Do you think it would be worth it or have you yourself gone through a prep course of any kind to help you in the GMAT?




    To be 100% honest, i would contact the school you would like to attend and find out their GMAT score range and then take the practice test before you sign up for a course. In the current economy, a lot of schools are suffering from poor enrollment in their professional programs(meaning you work while in school) and are accepting people much more easily then before. For instance, i am in a top 20 Professional MBA program right now and my GMAT score was only a 680. I work closely with the director of admissions at my school doing information sessions and welcoming new students to the program and know for a fact that people who have GMAT scores as low as 550 have been accepted due to the economy and low enrollment. Just something to consider before paying thousands for a Kaplan course that might be completely unnecessary for you at this point in time.
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    Jun 28, 2010 4:27 PM GMT
    I wouldn't worry about the pics. This is RealJock, a place where we gay men can show our stuff.

    Having said that, we all know there are places where discretion is required.

    The GMAT. By all means go through a prep course.
    The higher you can push the score the better off you will be.
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    Jun 28, 2010 5:00 PM GMT
    jjdayz said
    Aggieboy saidI know that because of my pics I don't seem educated or what not... however, I decided to matriculate myself into grad school (or try to at least). I want to receive my Master's degree in finance. The first thing I need to do is take my GMAT. I know very little about this exam. Do you guys think I should sign myself up for a prep course? If so, which? Do you think it would be worth it or have you yourself gone through a prep course of any kind to help you in the GMAT?




    To be 100% honest, i would contact the school you would like to attend and find out their GMAT score range and then take the practice test before you sign up for a course. In the current economy, a lot of schools are suffering from poor enrollment in their professional programs(meaning you work while in school) and are accepting people much more easily then before. For instance, i am in a top 20 Professional MBA program right now and my GMAT score was only a 680. I work closely with the director of admissions at my school doing information sessions and welcoming new students to the program and know for a fact that people who have GMAT scores as low as 550 have been accepted due to the economy and low enrollment. Just something to consider before paying thousands for a Kaplan course that might be completely unnecessary for you at this point in time.



    I agree with this completely. Get a feel for the score range in your program first because a lot of schools these days are placing less importance on standardized tests. I've noticed a lot of programs aren't placing as much emphasis even on GRE's, which seem to have become more of an application formality than something that helps/hinders your chances of acceptance.

    After that, definitely take a practice test first to see where you stand. It helps to know what are your strengths and weaknesses beforehand. But all I can say is that taking prep courses and taking the practice tests a few times can't hurt your score!
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    Jun 28, 2010 5:06 PM GMT
    Wow thanks guys. All these are great responses. I was looking at the princeton review prep course. It is $1100. They are small classes that are held 7 days spread throughout two weeks. Each class is 3 hours in length. Hopefully ill kick ass on this test. I am a bit worried because my sat in high school wasn't very good icon_sad.gif
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    Jun 28, 2010 5:10 PM GMT
    Aggieboy saidWow thanks guys. All these are great responses. I was looking at the princeton review prep course. It is $1100. They are small classes that are held 7 days spread throughout two weeks. Each class is 3 hours in length. Hopefully ill kick ass on this test. I am a bit worried because my sat in high school wasn't very good icon_sad.gif


    Don't be discouraged. For one thing, what you did in high school no longer matters. Secondly, standardized tests are no longer the deal breakers they used to be in college admissions. Many are beginning to realize the weaknesses of standardized tests and how they don't necessarily reflect a student's academic performance. Most admissions committees are looking at the overall picture and what you can bring to your own education. These days, bad test scores won't necessarily keep you out just as great test scores may not necessarily get you in.

    Life is full of tests! This is just another one to get through. Though I agree with a previous poster that learning the test format is a big key in being able to do well. Once you're familiar with how to take it, you can more easily concentrate on what you have to do.