Someone point me in the right direction!

  • allatonce

    Posts: 904

    Feb 06, 2008 10:06 PM GMT
    Ok, so I decided that I wanted to try and build up some muscle mass this winter and then try to burn off some fat this spring, as I have always been told that you can not do both at the same time. I have been following the realjock 12 week strength program and have found it to be pretty good. I thought I had been eating enough to help build muscle, I generally eat a wrap/sandwich before and after working out and a protein shake after as well.

    Recently, I have noticed that my waist size is getting smaller, and don't really know what that means. I checked the scale and I am down 5 pounds. I THOUGHT I was starting to gain some muscle, albeit very slowly, and now I just don't know. Does this mean I haven't, and that I am actually losing muscle mass? As a former fattie I find it hard to convince myself to eat anymore, as I want to limit the amount of fat I gain while building muscle. Is this type of thing normal? Am I being stupid and not eating enough?

    Thanks, you guys rock!
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    Feb 06, 2008 10:09 PM GMT
    how many calories are you eating a day?
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    Feb 07, 2008 1:22 AM GMT
    boy, there are a lot of cute canadians. ... icon_biggrin.gif
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    Feb 07, 2008 1:35 AM GMT
    According to your scale you have lost five pounds. That is five pounds of muscle, fat, or both. The scale itself will not be able to tell you if you are gaining muscle mass per say. Usually for males, our main fat repositories are at the stomach so if your waist is getting smaller that may be a good sign.

    A very simple way of getting a feel on your body fat would be to pinch your arms at your triceps and see how much of the 'fat' you can squeeze between your fingers. Note that amount, keep working on your routine, and note it again a week later.

    Limiting your food intake may also stunt your body's ability to grow lean muscle. You have to be selective in what you can eat, and there are actually plenty of things you can eat in good amounts. Generally for carbohydrates foods like whole-wheat bread and brown rice are better than white bread and white rice. Protein intake should also match your body's current needs and then exceed in order to provide the building materials for mass. White meat chicken is good, and there are plenty of different protein supplements on the market.

    Most of the information you seek is contained in this forum, just browse through and you should hit them.
  • allatonce

    Posts: 904

    Feb 07, 2008 3:17 AM GMT
    Generally eat around 2500 calories a day.
  • medic

    Posts: 25

    Feb 07, 2008 4:05 AM GMT
    Good information so far. Keeping your intake to low fat with higher protein intake will supply the amino acids to build muscle. If you expend more calories that you put in you will lose weight. 2500 is adequate for a sedentary lifestyle but frequent and regular exercise can exceed 3000 cal/day easily. Taking overall measurements before the program in biceps, chest, waist, buttocks and thighs can give you a yardstick to measure success. A body fat measurement may help you see your success too.

    Keep training!
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Feb 07, 2008 11:37 AM GMT
    2500 cals is kind of on the low side for a man who is working out regularly
    but what you eat is probably MORE important than the amt you eat
    nothing processed...no fast foods
    zero to little fat
    lean meats...high protein
    complex carbs
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    Feb 07, 2008 9:07 PM GMT
    so from there you know 2500 is your low point as you are losing weight. Now Chucky will come on and start telling you eat eat eat. Having trodden the path you have trodden and are about start on start by increasing those cals at week 1 by 200, give it 2 weeks and see how your body adapts, then increase by another 200. To give yu an idea thats roughly 2 aerage sized glasses of semi skimmed milk.

    As long as your training increases in either weight or indeed number of reps then you will start to add mass (that is depending what else you are doing)

    High protein or high carb is a matter of choice and doesnt bear much in relation to training or nutrition science other than the 1g per kg of body weight anything over that is just a form of fuel and is of no benefit to adding muscle.

    Dont forget your hydration level still needs to be up aim for roughly 2 litres a day plus 1 litre for every hour of exercise. After all, muscle is 70% water.

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    Feb 07, 2008 9:34 PM GMT
    Golly, Jethrow, sounds likes someone has built some muscle and has upped their base metabolic rate. Gosh, that sounds good. DOH!

    Yep, time to start fueling the furnace! Eat!
  • allatonce

    Posts: 904

    Feb 08, 2008 3:29 AM GMT
    Thanks for all the advice guys. I definitely think I'm fine water wise, I'm always drinking lots of water. I went to mandarin today for my friend's birthday. HAHA, not ideal, but I'm sure I ate more than 2500 today. I'm going to work on the lean protein, but it's hard on a student's budget to always make sure that I'm eating enough lean meat. I'll do my best though!
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    Feb 08, 2008 10:57 PM GMT
    lovinglife4 saidThanks for all the advice guys. I definitely think I'm fine water wise, I'm always drinking lots of water. I went to mandarin today for my friend's birthday. HAHA, not ideal, but I'm sure I ate more than 2500 today. I'm going to work on the lean protein, but it's hard on a student's budget to always make sure that I'm eating enough lean meat. I'll do my best though!


    cheap protein sources:

    Tuna in brine (olive oil for a bulk)
    Milk by the gallon
    Oats (great for starting the day and firing the metabolism add the milk and watch that protein soar through the roof!)

    High protein food Protein Carbs
    EGGS ( 1 medium size ) 6 grams 0 g
    MILK ( 1 pint or 568ml) 19 grams 24 g
    MILK ( 1 glass ) 6.3 grams 8 g
    SOYA MILK Plain (200 ml) 6 grams 1.6 g
    TOFU (100 g) 8 grams 0.8 g
    LOW-FAT YOGHURT (plain)150g 8 grams 10 g
    LOW-FAT YOGHURT (fruit)150g 6 grams 27 g
    FISH (cod fillets 100g) 21 grams 0 g
    CHEESE cheddar 100g 25 grams 0.1 g
    ROAST BEEF ( 100g ) 28 grams 0 g
    ROAST CHICKEN 100g 25 grams 0 g
    OTHER MEATS AVERAGE (100g) 25 grams 0 g
    OATS (81g) serving) 11 grams 56g
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    Feb 08, 2008 11:15 PM GMT
    Medic and BFG are making sense but im drawn between both. Myself have the same problem. Been working out since June. I already lost what I wanted I was at 175pds and now weigh 141. I was at 145pds for the past 3 months and I thought I had reached a plateau. Once I started strength training, I started loosing more weight.
    I do not want to get anymore skinnier but do want to bulk up more.

    I have not been riding my bicycle due to cold weather but im still loosing weight.

    Keep the advice comming as this really helps to know.

    Thank you.
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    Feb 08, 2008 11:28 PM GMT
    I dont want to appear narcisistic, well anymore than I already do, so have sent ya both a link so you can read a daily real life account and come to your own conclusion

    At the end of the day where is the science or indeed the math (as thats what it all comes down to) in selecting a figure of 3000 calories?

    3000 based against what activity level? Simple answer is its a nonsensical figure with baseless foundation and need to be matched by a programme. (not meaning that to sound disrespectful). But eating a figure of calories without knowing what the activity level will cater for is what gets/got you fat in the first place.

    All that 3000 represents is a green light to eat more