Older, more educated workers, have highest length of unemployment

  • metta

    Posts: 39104

    Jul 06, 2010 11:15 PM GMT
    Older, more educated workers, have highest length of unemployment


    http://www.calculatedriskblog.com/2010/07/older-more-educated-workers-have.html
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Jul 07, 2010 2:44 AM GMT
    doesn't surprise me. no one would even give my application a double take because of my masters
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    Jul 07, 2010 2:59 AM GMT
    Which would indicate that employers are seeking "the young and the dumb". Who better to pay less than those who (generally) by virtue of either naiveté or ignorance will expect less, ask for less, and know less about asking for more.

    And, even our young people out of school are finding it difficult to get that all important entry level position.

    It's still an intergenerational problem in the end (and for many more reasons than alluded to here).
  • toybrian

    Posts: 395

    Jul 07, 2010 3:13 AM GMT
    Metta, only bad thing is we either get lucky and find a nice job that pays well or after telling many companies that we do not want to work for $10 less an hour that we finally have to settle for less because out unemployment runs out and we have no choice and that sucks...we have the experience they want and they know it but will not pay for it and we know that.....good luck to all those that are unemployed...
  • BIG_N_TALL

    Posts: 2190

    Jul 07, 2010 3:25 AM GMT
    I for the first time yesterday didn't state I have a Bachelors degree on an employment application. It's ironic really considering I had a chat with my Mid East Politics professor two years ago when he told me that he knew of people "hiding" undergraduate and graduate degrees to try and get a job. I am more irritated with companies wanting to hire people at "30 hours a week." It appears to me that they are just trying to preclude people from getting benefits they would be afforded at 32 hours a week - technically full time employment. It's fucking joke icon_evil.gif
  • Greygull

    Posts: 282

    Jul 07, 2010 3:31 AM GMT
    People wont hire me with 5 years of experience a bachlors and great apprenticeship under my belt icon_sad.gif*
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    Jul 07, 2010 5:22 AM GMT
    This shouldn't be a big surprise. Reality is harsh sometimes. I do think the industry you're in makes a difference when it comes to your employability when considering age and education.

    In the IT field, which I'm in, highly skilled people with specialized skills are in demand no matter their age or education. Notwithstanding that, a person who has only a high school education and little experience is unlikely to find work easily.

    At the same time, someone with lots of experience and who has a PhD in computer science is also unlikely to find a job easily. There is a perception that someone with a PhD is going to expect too much money and not want to do any menial work, which is often necessary in IT.

    When it comes to considering age alone, I don't think IT is too discriminatory. Employers are accustomed to paying high salaries for talented IT people and older people tend to have years of valuable knowledge that most employers do tend to recognize.
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    Jul 07, 2010 6:54 AM GMT
    I completely agree... I thought to myself the other day how most of my educated professional friends are unemployed, while most of my friends that would be considered more blue collar all have jobs.
  • metta

    Posts: 39104

    Jul 07, 2010 6:56 AM GMT
    Glob. Ciizen.
    ^
    That is true but I think that the IT industry probably has its own issues. The demands within the field seem to change quickly so it is very important to try and keep your skills a few steps ahead....which can be guessing at times. Then there is the issue of outsourcing to other countries (especially india) that could also be a threat.
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    Jul 07, 2010 2:25 PM GMT
    cold saidMy guess is...

    Older, more educated job seekers have higher expectations. They apply for jobs with better security and remuneration.An increasingly educated workforce striving for low turn-over positions means longer durations of unemployment?


    I agree.

    I think sometimes these people with the major degrees do not want to settle for anything less than what they think they should get with their degrees.

    When hiring people I always look for personality, how long they stayed at their previous jobs, what they are looking to gain out of employment with me. I look at their body language, hands above the table/desk and not crossed. I do not even look at education but to be honest, I have been turned off by some older candidates who walk in with a masters degree and apply for a customer satisfaction representative position. I always wonder why and most of the time their answers do not suffice my curiosity.

    I believe that because of the negative idea we have about older job candidates, this also keeps the older candidates from getting the job. Most people think the older the job candidate is, the more likely they are to try to think they know it all because of their previous experience. They will be less likely to train and less likely to grasp new ides. Somewhat of a "stuck in their ways" sort of thing.

    People should just get a job that makes them happy even if it isn't their dream job. It's better to have a job that makes you happy than be unemployed and looking for that dream job. But don't get a job just to get a job and end up miserable. Maybe these people who are increasingly unemployed should apply at any job just to get off unemployment...museums, an art gallery, a tourist spot, anything!

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    Jul 07, 2010 2:30 PM GMT
    I think it's important to distinguish between voluntary and involuntary employment as well. I think some "older, more educated" professionals" hold out longer because of higher job expectations. In short, they just don't settle for what's out and available, they wait for the best offer, because after all, their education and/or experience "entitle" them to be pickier with their job prospects.

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    Jul 07, 2010 2:48 PM GMT
    The three previous posters obviously don't have a firm grasp of the topic. To assume that older, more educated (unemployed) Americans are holding out for the best opportunities is one of the most ridiculous generalizations I've read on the subject to date.
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    Jul 07, 2010 3:22 PM GMT
    Food for thought:

    I have been trying to get in with one particular company for over a year. I have applied for ten positions, only to see them given to younger and less qualified people.

    I also temp with the same company, and have met some of the people working in those positions. One woman did phone sales before, and one man drove taxis. One woman had a criminal past (not that really means anything, I guess).
    It hurts like hell. I have done everything right. Education, good grades, good work record, congenial, ambitious...but something is missing. Or I have something the others don't have. Education.

    I have been considering going back to college, but seriously REconsidering now. The idea of debt has me scared; especially after reports that it may be years for the job market to rebound.

    Let's pray unemployment benefits get extended.


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    Jul 07, 2010 3:30 PM GMT
    I will admit to holding out for a better job.

    I can work 20 hours at a local Macy's. After Gas and tolls(which I don't get reimbursed for), I break even with my unemployment check.

    I could work at Wal-Mart...icon_confused.gif

    In Orlando, they are projecting 10 to 12 people applying for any open position.

    I would really love to shake the hands of some greasy New York bankers who started this crisis. Right after I kick their balls.
  • BIG_N_TALL

    Posts: 2190

    Jul 07, 2010 3:51 PM GMT
    n8698u saidFood for thought:

    I have been trying to get in with one particular company for over a year. I have applied for ten positions, only to see them given to younger and less qualified people.

    I also temp with the same company, and have met some of the people working in those positions. One woman did phone sales before, and one man drove taxis. One woman had a criminal past (not that really means anything, I guess).
    It hurts like hell. I have done everything right. Education, good grades, good work record, congenial, ambitious...but something is missing. Or I have something the others don't have. Education.

    I have been considering going back to college, but seriously REconsidering now. The idea of debt has me scared; especially after reports that it may be years for the job market to rebound.

    Let's pray unemployment benefits get extended.




    I nearly got an internship with a lobbyist firm on K Street in D.C., and was told I didn't get it because they weren't sure I know what "direction" I wanted to go in life - like anyone does at the moment. The only thing I took away from that complete and utter waste of my time was the fact one of the younger lobbyists (~27 years old) said that I SHOULD NOT go to graduate school to get a degree for a job that didn't absolutely require it.

    I've done some serious career re-evaluation lately, and I think the only reason I would go back is to get a grad degree is for history, LGBT studies, (or a stretch) international relations. Those respective subjects I could teach about at a college or university. That is the only reason I'd go back to school now. I might not make a great deal of money as an assistant or even associate professor of history or LGBT studies, but I think I would be a great deal happier.
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    Jul 07, 2010 4:01 PM GMT
    reppaT saidThe three previous posters obviously don't have a firm grasp of the topic. To assume that older, more educated (unemployed) Americans are holding out for the best opportunities is one of the most ridiculous generalizations I've read on the subject to date.


    It COULD be ridiculous ("could" because who are we to say that someone's actions are ridiculous without knowing his/her motivation for the decision) but that's not to say it's not happening. To assume that people decide based only on rational economic motivations alone is absurd. People (or at least some) have pride.

    I personally know a CFO who is now unemployed. Was offered to be a manager at a consulting firm and take a pay cut? He didn't accept. Why? Because he thinks he's overqualified. Ridiculous? Maybe to us. Obviously NOT to him.

    And maybe I'm confused but when did saying "some" become a generalization?
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    Jul 07, 2010 4:35 PM GMT
    at_the_Ivy said
    reppaT saidThe three previous posters obviously don't have a firm grasp of the topic. To assume that older, more educated (unemployed) Americans are holding out for the best opportunities is one of the most ridiculous generalizations I've read on the subject to date.


    It COULD be ridiculous ("could" because who are we to say that someone's actions are ridiculous without knowing his/her motivation for the decision) but that's not to say it's not happening. To assume that people decide based only on rational economic motivations alone is absurd. People (or at least some) have pride.

    I personally know a CFO who is now unemployed. Was offered to be a manager at a consulting firm and take a pay cut? He didn't accept. Why? Because he thinks he's overqualified. Ridiculous? Maybe to us. Obviously NOT to him.

    And maybe I'm confused but when did saying "some" become a generalization?


    Between the comments from the three of you, it was easy to walk away with that assumption. It doesn't matter that you said "some" or "all" because as an aggregate, my sweeping generalization comment stands.

    And I think it's great that you happen to know an ex-CFO that's turning down job offer(s) but, assuming what you say has an ounce of truth to it, this CFO you know is either an idiot or he's extremely wealthy and can afford to go for years without work.

    I saw this very thing happen during the dot-com crash. I saw dozens of executives at every level and age in my professional circle within the NYC area that ended up in completely different industries and at completely different pay grades than what they had grown accustomed to receiving.

    It's no different now than it was then.

    Pride doesn't put bread on the table.