"It's a very expensive jacket though..."

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    Jul 10, 2010 6:17 PM GMT
    That's what a salesclerk answered me when I asked her if they had the jacket in my size.

    Fortunately they didn't have it in my size, because I would have bought it after her remark.

    Is it a trick to actually make you buy the jacket (to proof a point), or are they just frank? And what does it make you feel when someone says that?
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    Jul 10, 2010 6:41 PM GMT
    I think the character that Julia Roberts played in "Pretty Woman" put it quite well when faced with a similar situation.

    She returned to the store where she was snubbed, she had "assistants" laden with expensive purchases, and basically said to the haughty sales clerk...

    "Mistake. Big mistake."
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    Jul 10, 2010 6:53 PM GMT
    GAMRican saidI think the character that Julia Roberts played in "Pretty Woman" put it quite well when faced with a similar situation.

    She returned to the store where she was snubbed, she had "assistants" laden with expensive purchases, and basically said to the haughty sales clerk...

    "Mistake. Big mistake."


    Love that scene, but it isn't really comparable, this girl was not bitchy and I didn't look like a prostitute :p
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    Jul 10, 2010 6:59 PM GMT
    I've wondered whether that was a sales technique myself - perhaps someone in retail can weigh in. I do know that when I was 15 and my dad, to prove some kind of point, was about to buy not one but two new cars from a salesman who'd snubbed him based on his outfit I killed the deal by asking dad why he'd reward bad behavior. So he went to another dealer and bought just one car. At 16 I realized, like the "Pretty Woman" salesclerks - "Mistake. Big mistake!" icon_confused.gif
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    Jul 10, 2010 7:17 PM GMT
    GAMRican saidI think the character that Julia Roberts played in "Pretty Woman" put it quite well when faced with a similar situation.

    She returned to the store where she was snubbed, she had "assistants" laden with expensive purchases, and basically said to the haughty sales clerk...

    "Mistake. Big mistake."


    Hahahaha the OP's experience also reminded me of Pretty Woman, OP, I would have told her, You bitch at least I don't work as a salesclerk and then given her the evil eye
    evileye_0.jpg
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    Jul 10, 2010 7:22 PM GMT
    eagermuscle saidI've wondered whether that was a sales technique myself - perhaps someone in retail can weigh in. I do know that when I was 15 and my dad, to prove some kind of point, was about to buy not one but two new cars from a salesman who'd snubbed him based on his outfit I killed the deal by asking dad why he'd reward bad behavior. So he went to another dealer and bought just one car. At 16 I realized, like the "Pretty Woman" salesclerks - "Mistake. Big mistake!" icon_confused.gif


    Good point!


    @ Devilish_Intention, she wasn't a bitch, she said it with a concerned face, and her job shouldn't really matter, at least she's working.
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    Jul 10, 2010 7:27 PM GMT
    Monir said


    @ Devilish_Intention, she wasn't a bitch, she said it with a concerned face, and her job shouldn't really matter, at least she's working.


    But it was kinda rude for her to tell you that, like you couldn't afford it or something.
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    Jul 10, 2010 7:39 PM GMT
    devilish_intentions said
    Monir said


    @ Devilish_Intention, she wasn't a bitch, she said it with a concerned face, and her job shouldn't really matter, at least she's working.


    But it was kinda rude for her to tell you that, like you couldn't afford it or something.


    Yeah it was rude, but that doesn't mean we have to be rude right ;)
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    Jul 10, 2010 7:46 PM GMT
    Monir said
    devilish_intentions said
    Monir said


    @ Devilish_Intention, she wasn't a bitch, she said it with a concerned face, and her job shouldn't really matter, at least she's working.


    But it was kinda rude for her to tell you that, like you couldn't afford it or something.


    Yeah it was rude, but that doesn't mean we have to be rude right ;)


    That's exactly what it means icon_razz.gif j/k j/k
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    Jul 10, 2010 7:56 PM GMT
    Been there...

    As my friend who worked in a jewelers said it doesn't mean you look like you can't afford it madam, it means....

    People usually don't walk in, say....Oh that looks nice and buy a €22,000 watch on a impulse
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    Jul 10, 2010 7:58 PM GMT
    MsclDrew saidBeen there...

    As my friend who worked in a jewelers said it doesn't mean you look like you can't afford it madam, it means....

    People usually don't walk in, say....Oh that looks nice and buy a €22,000 watch on a impulse


    That's a very reasonable explanation.
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    Jul 10, 2010 8:49 PM GMT
    I don't know about other places, but in Miami the salespeople tend to treat you BETTER when you're dressed down. They automatically assume you're one of the wealthier people who doesn't feel the need to show off.

    Those who are dressed up in designer stuff get snubbed, because 90% of the time they're what we call "30 thousand dollar a year millionaires."
  • Webster666

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    Jul 10, 2010 8:54 PM GMT
    Okay.
    I don't understand.
    OP, please give me a clue what she meant.

    A) That you couldn't afford it ?
    B) That a high price was a good selling point ?
    C) That you could brag about the high price ?
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    Jul 10, 2010 9:05 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidI don't know about other places, but in Miami the salespeople tend to treat you BETTER when you're dressed down. They automatically assume you're one of the wealthier people who doesn't feel the need to show off.

    Those who are dressed up in designer stuff get snubbed, because 90% of the time they're what we call "30 thousand dollar a year millionaires."


    That's an interesting theory as well! But then again, I have the impression that everyone in Miami chronically dresses down. Correct me if I am wrong.

    I never dress down, but I do wear comfy clothes when shopping. Its easier when trying on clothes.
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    Jul 10, 2010 9:07 PM GMT
    Webster666 saidOkay.
    I don't understand.
    OP, please give me a clue what she meant.

    A) That you couldn't afford it ?
    B) That a high price was a good selling point ?
    C) That you could brag about the high price ?


    B & C are certainly not what she meant. Maybe she assumed I couldn't afford it, so A. Or maybe she just said it because it was more expensive than the other items they sell, cause I bought shoes and a pair of jeans there too.
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    Jul 10, 2010 9:13 PM GMT
    Monir saidThat's an interesting theory as well! But then again, I have the impression that everyone in Miami chronically dresses down. Correct me if I am wrong.

    I never dress down, but I do wear comfy clothes when shopping. Its easier when trying on clothes.
    I chronically dressed down all my life...don't even own anything more than a couple pair of Dockers. And yeah, I found my home in Miami because everyone else dresses similar (except the po folks who try to show off).

    The richest person I know (multi-millionaire) dresses worse than me. Go figure... icon_lol.gif
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    Jul 10, 2010 9:15 PM GMT
    paulflexes said
    Monir saidThat's an interesting theory as well! But then again, I have the impression that everyone in Miami chronically dresses down. Correct me if I am wrong.

    I never dress down, but I do wear comfy clothes when shopping. Its easier when trying on clothes.
    I chronically dressed down all my life...don't even own anything more than a couple pair of Dockers. And yeah, I found my home in Miami because everyone else dresses similar (except the po folks who try to show off).

    The richest person I know (multi-millionaire) dresses worse than me. Go figure... icon_lol.gif


    That's what you call "Nouveau Riche" :p
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    Jul 10, 2010 10:14 PM GMT
    paulflexes said


    The richest person I know (multi-millionaire).


    So, is he a he, is he gay, is he single? You don't happen to have his number, do you?
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    Jul 10, 2010 10:20 PM GMT
    don't buy expensive clothes so i wouldn't know. expensive clothes are for people that need to prove themselves somehow.
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    Jul 10, 2010 10:22 PM GMT
    I wouldn't jump to any conclusions. If she didn't look like she was trying to be a snob then she probably wasn't. Sometimes I say stupid random things like that too, not fully thinking about what it might mean to the other person. I'm sure it was harmless. icon_smile.gif

    realman77 saiddon't buy expensive clothes so i wouldn't know. expensive clothes are for people that need to prove themselves somehow.


    Why do you feel the need to generalize? Does it make you feel superior?
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    Jul 10, 2010 10:30 PM GMT
    because it's the truth. the truth hurts sometimes.
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    Jul 10, 2010 10:32 PM GMT
    realman77 saiddon't buy expensive clothes so i wouldn't know. expensive clothes are for people that need to prove themselves somehow.


    That's not entirely true realman77!

    @ rumANDcoke, I agree with you.
  • phunkie

    Posts: 325

    Jul 10, 2010 10:34 PM GMT
    GAMRican saidI think the character that Julia Roberts played in "Pretty Woman" put it quite well when faced with a similar situation.

    She returned to the store where she was snubbed, she had "assistants" laden with expensive purchases, and basically said to the haughty sales clerk...

    "Mistake. Big mistake."




    Yes, I looked up the scene. Feel free to judge me.
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    Jul 10, 2010 10:44 PM GMT
    realman77 saidbecause it's the truth. the truth hurts sometimes.


    It amazes me that people can make blanket judgments and claim it's the truth. Who's truth are we talking about? Your truth? Did you read this in a scientific journal or is it just something you just decided was true because you think anything that comes out of your mouth is fact?

    @ Monir - Sorry for high-jacking your thread! icon_evil.gif
  • Celticmusl

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    Jul 10, 2010 10:45 PM GMT
    Having been in sales over ten years, although not retail, I would just assume the statement was a start off point for conversation and to put the buyer at ease.

    The extremely wealthy people I know would follow with "I know, that price is highway robbery. But if it makes me look good....." None of them would even consider paying more than they would have to, and that might be why they are rich.