Apple IPhone 4 Fails to Get Consumer Reports Backing

  • silverfox

    Posts: 3178

    Jul 13, 2010 4:10 AM GMT
    Well it had to happen sooner or later. Do you think this is a major setback for Apple or just a small glitch that will soon be fixed and forgotten?




    Bloomberg
    Apple IPhone 4 Fails to Get Consumer Reports Backing
    July 12, 2010, 4:07 PM EDT


    By Arik Hesseldahl

    July 12 (Bloomberg) -- Consumer Reports said it isn’t recommending Apple Inc.’s iPhone 4 following tests confirming the handset has a hardware flaw that causes signal quality to degrade.

    “The problem seems to be a design flaw, and it is significant,” Mike Gikas, senior electronics editor for Consumer Reports, said today in an interview. The publication has recommended the three previous iPhone models.

    Tests were conducted in a room designed to eliminate radio- frequency interference, he said. The results showed that when a user covers the phone’s lower-left side, where two parts of the external antenna meet, the loss of signal strength may lead to dropped calls in areas where AT&T Inc.’s coverage is weak. The tests suggest AT&T’s network, often criticized for spotty iPhone coverage, isn’t responsible for the signal problems.

    AT&T is the iPhone’s exclusive carrier in the U.S. Apple says the problem is software-related and involves how the phone displays signal strength. A fix will be released, the company said on July 2.

    “If the signal is strong in the area, then you won’t lose the call,” Gikas said. Consumer Reports is published by the nonprofit Consumers Union, based in Yonkers, New York.

    Natalie Kerris, a spokeswoman for Cupertino, California- based Apple, didn’t immediately return phone and e-mail messages seeking comment. Mark Siegel, a spokesman for AT&T in Dallas, had no comment.

    More Phones Tested

    Consumer Reports also tested other phones, including Apple’s older iPhone 3GS, and the Palm Pre, and found they didn’t suffer from the same problems as the iPhone 4, Gikas said.

    Gikas suggested that users who experience the problem apply duct tape, which doesn’t conduct electricity, to the gap in order to reduce the chance of causing signal interference.

    Apple has faced criticism since the phone went on sale June 24, with consumers complaining about losses of signal strength when holding the phone along its left-side black stripe.

    Apple fell $2.34 to $257.29 at 4 p.m. New York time on the Nasdaq Stock Market. The shares have gained 22 percent this year.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 13, 2010 4:37 AM GMT
    My old Motorola Razr on ATT holds a signal better than the iphone. icon_lol.gif
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    Jul 13, 2010 4:55 AM GMT
    that looks bad on Apple. I just hope they fix that issue before they ship the damn phone to Canada. It will definitely cost them a lot of money to get all those iPhone 4 replaced but right now as it is, I dont think a post sale fix is feasible. Its definitely not a software issue but a hardware problem and selling rubber bands for an extra $20 in order to mitigate their design mistakes is just plain insulting.
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    Jul 16, 2010 5:28 PM GMT
    charlitos saidthat looks bad on Apple. I just hope they fix that issue before they ship the damn phone to Canada. It will definitely cost them a lot of money to get all those iPhone 4 replaced but right now as it is, I dont think a post sale fix is feasible. Its definitely not a software issue but a hardware problem and selling rubber bands for an extra $20 in order to mitigate their design mistakes is just plain insulting.


    I agree. And they're going to have to hurry because so many other companies are starting to catch up with competitive phones. This probably wasn't the best time for this to happen.
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    Jul 16, 2010 5:37 PM GMT
    eh, I think Steve Jobs is right when he says the issue is blown waaaaay out of proportion. I know five iPhone 4 owners and none of them have a problem.

    It's never news when the plane lands safely, only when it crashes. I suspect we are hearing from a very small percentage of owners who have problems. I'll be the first to yell and scream when there's a real problem, from Apple or any other company, but I think this is massively overblown.

    To answer Silverfox's original question: Small problem, soon to be forgotten.

  • CAtoFL

    Posts: 834

    Jul 16, 2010 6:02 PM GMT
    I have the opposite situation. I have two of them and BOTH have reception issues (because of the antenna if left uncovered) AND proximity sensor issues.

    So ... what are the solutions offered today?

    Their 'solution' to the antenna problem is to give us a bumper case. BUT, no refund for third-party cases (like the ones I bought).

    Their 'solution' to the proximity sensor problem is that they're "working on it". Terrific. Until then, I'll continue to dial numbers with my cheek when I talk on it. Always impressive when I'm on a business call. And yes, I've done two full resets and one network reset. Nothing mitigated the problem.

    Hey, and if I'm not satisfied, I can return it. Great! Is AT&T going to negate the two year extension I had to agree to when I bought Apple's flawed product??!

    This is pretty much "customer service" at it's most arrogant.

    Might be a 'small problem' for some. Others have longer memories.
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    Jul 16, 2010 6:14 PM GMT
    CAtoFL said

    Hey, and if I'm not satisfied, I can return it. Great! Is AT&T going to negate the two year extension I had to agree to when I bought Apple's flawed product??!

    This is pretty much "customer service" at it's most arrogant.


    Wait how is this arrogant? Or did I misread?
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    Jul 16, 2010 6:21 PM GMT
    CAtoFL saidI have the opposite situation. I have two of them and BOTH have reception issues (because of the antenna if left uncovered) AND proximity sensor issues.

    So ... what are the solutions offered today?

    Their 'solution' to the antenna problem is to give us a bumper case. BUT, no refund for third-party cases (like the ones I bought).

    Their 'solution' to the proximity sensor problem is that they're "working on it". Terrific. Until then, I'll continue to dial numbers with my cheek when I talk on it. Always impressive when I'm on a business call. And yes, I've done two full resets and one network reset. Nothing mitigated the problem.

    Hey, and if I'm not satisfied, I can return it. Great! Is AT&T going to negate the two year extension I had to agree to when I bought Apple's flawed product??!

    This is pretty much "customer service" at it's most arrogant.

    Might be a 'small problem' for some. Others have longer memories.



    Yes, AT&T will let you out of the contract. Not sure how "working on it" is an unacceptable answer. When you buy brand-new technology like this, you never know what you're going to get... rarely complete perfection out of the gate. Maybe you should have waited for six months or a year before buying it. Now you can return it for your money back, you're actually getting off easy. Arrogant would have been to say there's no issue and let you deal. Just sayin...

  • CAtoFL

    Posts: 834

    Jul 16, 2010 6:24 PM GMT
    The arrogance is providing a limited solution that's no solution at all.

    But here's a quote from today's live blog about the presentation that illustrates it even better:

    "Is there another software fix available for this problem? Steve says the iPhone 4 doesn't really have a problem compared to previous iPhone 3GS. Steve is getting touchy on this question because he doesn't want to say the iPhone 4 has any bigger problem than other phones". - sfgate.com (SF Chronicle).

    Their arrogance is providing a 'solution' that's convenient to the company and not to the consumer and - in my specific instance - a solution that is no solution at all. I still have a flawed product (with antenna and proximity sensor issues) and there is no recourse for me even though I bought a product which is clearly not the product it was purported to be. It's the same as Toyota taking years to admit their product was flawed.

    My only 'feel good' option (which I'll pursue) is to return the product and try to talk AT&T into nullifying the two year extension I entered into when I thought the iPhone 4 was unflawed. I sincerely doubt they'll be generous enough to do that. So, what's my net-net? I end up getting screwed. A consumer lesson learned.

    EDIT: I hope you're right about the two year extension with AT&T. We'll see. Even then, I'll still be out for $58 worth of useless cases I bought because they're 'third party'. Great experience.
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    Jul 16, 2010 6:27 PM GMT
    CAtoFL saidThe arrogance is providing a limited solution that's no solution at all.

    But here's a quote from today's live blog about the presentation that illustrates it even better:

    "Is there another software fix available for this problem? Steve says the iPhone 4 doesn't really have a problem compared to previous iPhone 3GS. Steve is getting touchy on this question because he doesn't want to say the iPhone 4 has any bigger problem than other phones". - sfgate.com (SF Chronicle).

    Their arrogance is providing a 'solution' that's convenient to the company and not to the consumer and - in my specific instance - a solution that is no solution at all. I still have a flawed product (with antenna and proximity sensor issues) and there is no recourse for me even though I bought a product which is clearly not the product it was purported to be. It's the same as Toyota taking years to admit their product was flawed.

    My option (which I'll pursue) is to return the product and try to talk AT&T into nullifying the two year extension I entered into when I thought the iPhone 4 was unflawed. I sincerely doubt they'll be generous enough to do that. So, what's my net-net? I end up getting screwed. A consumer lesson learned.



    My, my. Chill out. Read the details. Jobs said AT&T will let you out of the contract, and Apple will give you a full refund. Then you're back to where you were before you decided to purchase brand-new technology that wasn't yet tried and tested in the real world.

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    Jul 16, 2010 6:35 PM GMT
    I think steve is very forthcoming in letting us know that the antenna is external and your hand will come between the phone and the signal. i can dig up the quote if its required from today's press conference.

    I personally did a lot of research on the new iphone when I was considering purchasing this. I also was aware of this phenomenon with other cell phones in the past, although no one really linked it to this phone prior to the release.

    To anyone who might care, I have experienced improved call quality and less dropped calls. Also, maybe it is my phone habits, but half the time I use the earbuds when I talk anyway. it sits in my car, in my lap, or on my cup holder in the car. I'll take my free bumper and enjoy my phone even more!

    My iphone works super well. If it didn't, I would return it and quit bitching. I think someone already mentioned it, but this is a newer technology, and being an early adopter you have to be prepared for a few bumps along the way. Also, any good apple customer knows that nothing they release is ever perfect the first time.
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Jul 16, 2010 6:50 PM GMT
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