Hmm... Who owns your profile?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 13, 2010 5:19 AM GMT
    http://news.cnet.com/8301-31921_3-20010331-281.html?tag=newsLeadStoriesArea.1

    Former editor of "XY Magazine" files bankruptcy. Trustee claims subscriber list and web site database (of teen gays). Claims duty to monetize it in order to benefit creditors.
  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    Jul 13, 2010 12:05 PM GMT
    For the last time people: WHAT YOU PUT ON THE WEB IS NO LONGER IN YOUR CONTROL.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 13, 2010 12:11 PM GMT
    DCEric saidFor the last time people: WHAT YOU PUT ON THE WEB IS NO LONGER IN YOUR CONTROL.

    Absolutely. You have no reasonable expectation of privacy with anything posted to the internet or sent through e-mail .
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Jul 13, 2010 12:44 PM GMT
    Pianist said
    DCEric saidFor the last time people: WHAT YOU PUT ON THE WEB IS NO LONGER IN YOUR CONTROL.

    Absolutely. You have no reasonable expectation of privacy with anything posted to the internet or sent through e-mail .


    that's completely untrue. the ftc has warned the owners that it's illegal to do so under their own tos.
  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    Jul 13, 2010 12:59 PM GMT
    calibro said
    Pianist said
    DCEric saidFor the last time people: WHAT YOU PUT ON THE WEB IS NO LONGER IN YOUR CONTROL.

    Absolutely. You have no reasonable expectation of privacy with anything posted to the internet or sent through e-mail .


    that's completely untrue. the ftc has warned the owners that it's illegal to do so under their own tos.


    Doesn't matter, once it is on the Internet it's anybody's guess as to who has access to it. Do you know who owns RJ? How do you know that they aren't doing something they shouldn't. If you put it on the web you have lost all control over it.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Jul 13, 2010 1:00 PM GMT
    how do you know your credit card company isn't selling your purchasing habits to marketers or your social security number to the black market? what people do and what people can legally do are two different things and that has nothing to do with the internet.
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Jul 13, 2010 1:04 PM GMT
    my profile is sponsored by Mentos - The Freshmaker
  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    Jul 13, 2010 1:26 PM GMT
    Timberoo saidmy profile is sponsored by Mentos - The Freshmaker


    Whoa! I'm supported by Diet Coke, I guess we need to stay away from each other.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 13, 2010 1:32 PM GMT
    calibro saidhow do you know your credit card company isn't selling your purchasing habits to marketers or your social security number to the black market? what people do and what people can legally do are two different things and that has nothing to do with the internet.

    Agree with this distinction. At the same time, I think the Internet provides additional opportunities for people to do illegal things with your info, as well as make it easier. So that your Internet-based personal data is more vulnerable to both accidental & deliberate privacy violations than other traditional forms of data storage.

    In this XY case, I wonder about the legal issues. You wrote that the FTC used the issue of TOS as a basis for it being illegal. I presume that refers to a standard statement that personal information with not be shared with third parties without permission.

    But, what happens after bankruptcy? Do such obligations to subscribers cease, just as original obligations to creditors & investors also cease? Here's what the firm representing the trustee said: "Any property listed on the debtor's bankruptcy petition is property of the bankruptcy estate..."

    It seems when the former Editor/Owner filed for bankruptcy, in addition to listing a personal car worth $1500 (!) he included this data, which the court accepted. Now it may be the estate's property, and is the estate bound by the former TOS? And 2 of the company's investors seem to think that they are as entitled to this data as much as the Editor was to declare it as an asset. And if that's not complex enough, did I read something that even disputes whether the court has really even appointed a trustee at all??? Ugh...

    Interesting questions. Legal issues are rarely ever cut-and-dried in the US, and the whole thing may turn on some obscure point of law that has little or nothing to do with the core matter of Internet privacy.
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Jul 13, 2010 1:44 PM GMT
    DCEric said
    Timberoo saidmy profile is sponsored by Mentos - The Freshmaker


    Whoa! I'm supported by Diet Coke, I guess we need to stay away from each other.


    either that or we should get together and make a big, sticky mess
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 13, 2010 2:59 PM GMT
    calibro said
    Pianist said
    DCEric saidFor the last time people: WHAT YOU PUT ON THE WEB IS NO LONGER IN YOUR CONTROL.

    Absolutely. You have no reasonable expectation of privacy with anything posted to the internet or sent through e-mail .


    that's completely untrue. the ftc has warned the owners that it's illegal to do so under their own tos.


    What is legal and what happens are two different things. I cannot speak to the former as I am not a lawyer; however, I am a Certified Cisco Networking Professional (CCNP). When you put things through a large and unsecured network, they're out there. E-mail by its very nature is insecure as it is unencrypted. A network administrator for any server your messages pass through can read them. Networks can be sniffed and packets/frames read. Routers and switches can be manipulated.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 13, 2010 3:39 PM GMT
    Timberoo said
    DCEric said
    Timberoo saidmy profile is sponsored by Mentos - The Freshmaker


    Whoa! I'm supported by Diet Coke, I guess we need to stay away from each other.


    either that or we should get together and make a big, sticky mess



    put THAT on the intrawebzes and see how long you control it... icon_twisted.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 13, 2010 3:41 PM GMT
    Pianist said
    calibro said
    Pianist said
    DCEric saidFor the last time people: WHAT YOU PUT ON THE WEB IS NO LONGER IN YOUR CONTROL.

    Absolutely. You have no reasonable expectation of privacy with anything posted to the internet or sent through e-mail .


    that's completely untrue. the ftc has warned the owners that it's illegal to do so under their own tos.


    What is legal and what happens are two different things. I cannot speak to the former as I am not a lawyer; however, I am a Certified Cisco Networking Professional (CCNP). When you put things through a large and unsecured network, they're out there. E-mail by its very nature is insecure as it is unencrypted. A network administrator for any server your messages pass through can read them. Networks can be sniffed and packets/frames read. Routers and switches can be manipulated.



    that almost sounded erotic... could you demonstrate? i'll be the model.
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Jul 13, 2010 4:04 PM GMT
    dancerjack said
    Timberoo said
    DCEric said
    Timberoo saidmy profile is sponsored by Mentos - The Freshmaker


    Whoa! I'm supported by Diet Coke, I guess we need to stay away from each other.


    either that or we should get together and make a big, sticky mess



    put THAT on the intrawebzes and see how long you control it... icon_twisted.gif


    are you looking to get into producing? ;)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 14, 2010 2:29 PM GMT
    The only problem I have with this is the line between what you post on the internet and personal information collected by the company for the purpose of billing. My name, address and credit card information is not information I post openly on the internet, however it appears that this is what is being sold.

    When there is a TOS in place that specifically states that your billing data will not be shared, it would seem that this should be honored during bankruptcy proceedings.

    When you enter your billing information this is normally done on a secured network. I understand that there is no guarantee that information will not be stolen by hackers even with SSL. However, that is not the same as data being sold against the TOS during a legal proceeding.

    I am not a lawyer so I have no idea how this will play out, but it would seem that if this protection is not currently in place, it should be.

    DCEric said
    calibro said
    Pianist said
    DCEric saidFor the last time people: WHAT YOU PUT ON THE WEB IS NO LONGER IN YOUR CONTROL.

    Absolutely. You have no reasonable expectation of privacy with anything posted to the internet or sent through e-mail .


    that's completely untrue. the ftc has warned the owners that it's illegal to do so under their own tos.


    Doesn't matter, once it is on the Internet it's anybody's guess as to who has access to it. Do you know who owns RJ? How do you know that they aren't doing something they shouldn't. If you put it on the web you have lost all control over it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jul 14, 2010 2:46 PM GMT
    So if my Dr goes bankrupt the agent can sell my medical records... or my bank can sell my financial records to the highest bidder


    This sets a precedent too dangerous to be allowed