British English translation, pls...

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    Feb 11, 2008 1:15 AM GMT
    What does "tosser" mean?

    I am watching a documentary on food and stress and exercise. They are using british cabbies as subjects. They sent in an undercover actor to aggrevate the cabbies. He succeeded. One cabbie called him a "tosser." What's that mean?

    The Truth About Food
    How To Be The Best
    TV-PG, CC

    This week female vegetarian martial arts experts go back to eating meat to see if it makes them fitter and stronger; stressed out cabbies test Omega-3 from oily fish, and Montana firefighters determine if snacking or traditional meals best suit them.


    http://www.realjock.com/reply?topicid=103649&postid=103649
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    Feb 11, 2008 1:18 AM GMT
    Wanker, masturbator etc.
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    Feb 11, 2008 1:26 AM GMT
    Thanks, Conker

    That's an insult? Like who doesnt?...including the cabbie.
  • Timbales

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    Feb 11, 2008 1:47 AM GMT
    Yeah, it's an insult. I guess it's kind of like calling someone useless.
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    Feb 11, 2008 3:56 AM GMT
    it means a wanker, basically.
    my friends and i use it a lot... depends really... when friends use it, it's more like a term of endearment

    but if you say it to a taxi driver who shortchanges you, for example, then it lives up to its real primary meaningicon_twisted.gif

    bahahahahahahahah!!!
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    Feb 11, 2008 5:49 AM GMT
    Hi Caslon.
    Tosser means an idiot it comes from Tossing which is masterbation also a "Wanker" is the same this comes from wanking (masterbating) it is a cockney phrase!


    Ok from a brit living in sunny turkey!

    Regards,
  • justjk

    Posts: 302

    Feb 11, 2008 5:51 AM GMT
    Yeah i alwsays wondered what Bollocks are? seems like balls, but it's used so often and differwntly that i just don't know!
  • ShawnTX

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    Feb 11, 2008 5:57 AM GMT
    justjk saidYeah i alwsays wondered what Bollocks are? seems like balls, but it's used so often and differwntly that i just don't know!


    You're right, it's slang for testicles. But it's used to mean nonsense as well.
  • xNYCMarc

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    Feb 11, 2008 5:57 AM GMT
    "Bollocks" does mean "balls", but it is also used in the same way that we would use the term "bullshit".
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    Feb 11, 2008 5:58 AM GMT
    I was hanging with my good friend recently... he is from the UK. and I told him that I had to "follow through" with something. He started laughing hysterically. I was like, what?
    Apparently, in the UK, "follow through" means, specifically, when you go to fart, but instead shit yourself.
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    Feb 11, 2008 6:16 AM GMT
    LOL indeed it does.

    It's like when I say "oh, that's pants!"
    It's a UK term that means basically the same as bollocks or bulshit, but only poms know it really...
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    Feb 11, 2008 9:18 AM GMT
    Bollocks is a great word, as it can be both good and bad.

    If something is a "load of bollocks", its awful. However is something is "the dogs bollocks" then it is amazingly good.
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    Feb 11, 2008 1:03 PM GMT
    justjk saidYeah i alwsays wondered what Bollocks are? seems like balls, but it's used so often and differwntly that i just don't know!


    Yes Bollocks is Balls and you can say a guy is talking a load of Bollocks also which means bullshit! Or crap?
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    Feb 11, 2008 1:33 PM GMT
    In 1979, I was working as a front desk manager in a busy Chicago hotel. I had a young woman working the desk when two British lads came up to her and asked where they can pick up some fags. The young lady was shocked and speachless, so I stepped up and told the lads that they can pick them up in the gift shop just across the lobby. The young lady, now really perplexed, shot around and looked at me in total disbelief and I explained that "fags" is a slang word for cigarettes in England. Then I explained that I speak "PBS".
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    Feb 11, 2008 1:36 PM GMT
    British Bed and Breakfast owner says "I'll come around tomorrow morning and knock you up."
    American female tourist says, "Well! Excuse me!!!" or "I be waitin for ya, honey!"

    In Britain, the above means I'll knock on your door.
    In America, the above means I'll make you pregnant.icon_lol.gif
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    Feb 11, 2008 1:53 PM GMT
    However fellow Americanas... We do speak the "QUEEN'S" English in the UK you know?
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    Feb 11, 2008 2:09 PM GMT
    I am convinced American should be labelled as a separate language. The usage is quite different, not even counting the rich English slang, grammatically its diverging too. Americans hardly ever use the subjunctive mood when asking for things, for example ;-( This is one of the reasons they tend to sound rather rude to the English ear, even though they don't mean to be.
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    Feb 11, 2008 2:32 PM GMT
    Kebab saidHowever fellow Americanas... We do speak the "QUEEN'S" English in the UK you know?


    icon_lol.gifBut which Queen are you talking about. There are and have been so many??

    Actually, according to "Mother Tongue", written by funny guy, Bill Bryson, the most original English is spoken by a few Americans that live in the Ozark Mountains. Apparently, they have been isolated for so long that they speak a closer form of Old English than even the educated British.
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    Feb 11, 2008 2:34 PM GMT
    TigerTim saidI am convinced American should be labelled as a separate language. The usage is quite different, not even counting the rich English slang, grammatically its diverging too. Americans hardly ever use the subjunctive mood when asking for things, for example ;-( This is one of the reasons they tend to sound rather rude to the English ear, even though they don't mean to be.


    A subjunctive story....

    Alexander Woolcott was showing a young man around New York. Woolcott pointed out Robert Benchley who was sitting in a theatre with Dorothy Parker.

    The young man (using the subjunctive) said "and that, I take it, would be Mrs. Benchley."

    "Undoubtedly," said Woolcott, "but it is Mrs. Parker."
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    Feb 11, 2008 3:57 PM GMT
    Not all americans eschew the subjunctive. It grates on my ear to hear "if I was" instead of "if I were."

    I believe British English doesnt use "gotten" as in "I have gotten." I think I have been told they consider it a superfluous word.
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    Feb 11, 2008 3:58 PM GMT
    A flip on the take of this thread.

    Imagine my horror on enterring McDonalds in Michingan a number of years back and ordering my meal and being offered "a free fanny pack" with my meal!!!!!

    In England a fanny is slang for "ladies bits" (trying not to make you all heave!) and one could only equate to what I was being offered as sanitary towels!!!!

    Or the CSI Miami episode over quite a serious issue of children being physicaly abused (non sexually) and all they kept on saying was "fanny spanking" I spat my dinner out every time I heard that!
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    Feb 11, 2008 4:00 PM GMT
    Caslon saidNot all americans eschew the subjunctive. It grates on my ear to hear "if I was" instead of "if I were."

    I believe British English doesnt use "gotten" as in "I have gotten." I think I have been told they consider it a superfluous word.


    indeed altho have heard it occasionaly due to more US programmes being shown on our telly, sorry television
  • Alan95823

    Posts: 306

    Feb 11, 2008 6:20 PM GMT
    I'm learning a lot more British slang by watching "How Clean is Your House"...

    To describe a bad smelling abode, the ladies have so far used the following words: honk, pong, and stench. Referring to the odor in one house as "the honks" was a new one to me, though I was familiar with the other two.

    The one expression that I think I've understood correctly to mean a house is filthy is "minging"... and the people who got the house into that state were referred to as "mingers". It would be interesting to know the background on that one.

    And apparently a "tip" is another word for garbage dump, because they call so many homes a "tip" or "rubbish tip".

    The one that had me laughing the most was on the BBC show "You Are What You Eat"... one lady was trying a new healthy dish prepared by the show's host, and referred to it as "the poodle's pieces". The host didn't know what that meant either, so I didn't feel bad about missing it.

    I am intrigued by the number of times "gorgeous" is used to describe good tasting food on that show, though.

    Fun stuff, comparing uses of language.
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    Feb 11, 2008 7:30 PM GMT
    Now dig this:

    "I had spit roast for New Year's Eve!"

    I'm actually being honest. LOL! Any real Brit / English bloke wanna translate that one for the rest of the crew?
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    Feb 11, 2008 8:03 PM GMT
    well I most definitely did and the young sexy twink in the middle of my boyfriend and I getting done at both ends thoroughly enjoyed it too! would be my answer ha ha ha ha

    As for the poodles pieces never heard that expression before we would normally just say the dogs bollox