Tuna, anyone?

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    Jul 16, 2010 8:43 AM GMT
    So, how can I make a healthy low fat version of a tuna sandwich?
    I dont really eat much for breakfast but im trying to gain muscle, so I figured a tuna sandwich is the way to go.
    Any recipes, suggestions? Thanks!
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    Jul 16, 2010 12:20 PM GMT
    im assuming your talking about canned tuna.

    I say ditch the can and go for the pouch type tuna now. The reason that canned tuna is so DISGUSTING is because they way it is packaged then heated to kill any bacteria make it tough, dry, and blah! The newer pouch type variety doesn't require as much heating and therefore leaves a better taste.

    I would recommend some type of a lettuce wrap sandwich, with a lemon caper dressing. Tuna and lemon are great together and with no mayo the fat goes way down! Sorry I am not a recipe person, I just throw things around in the kitchen!
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    Jul 16, 2010 2:20 PM GMT
    yeah stay away from canned foods...try egg whites and turkey meat... icon_smile.gif
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    Jul 16, 2010 2:27 PM GMT
    if you eat albacore, you should eat no more than one serving per week (actually depends on your weight) due to mercury content. 'light' tuna (really darker than albacore) has less mercury, but either way since tuna is at the 'top of the food chain', it is full of human-concentrated toxins. sorry.... i love it too.

    'safe' eating recommendations:
    http://www.nrdc.org/health/effects/mercury/tuna.asp
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    Jul 16, 2010 2:43 PM GMT
    GigoloAssassin saidSo, how can I make a healthy low fat version of a tuna sandwich?
    I dont really eat much for breakfast but im trying to gain muscle, so I figured a tuna sandwich is the way to go.
    Any recipes, suggestions? Thanks!



    Whole wheat bread (look to make sure it doesn't have corn syrup kind of junk).
    Mix the tuna with hummus and add lots of fresh green spinach. Mustard too. (If you wrap the sandwich in plastic wrap it'll help from falling apart when eating it.) Though it does have fat, this kind of sandwich is great if you want to gain muscle.
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    Jul 16, 2010 2:47 PM GMT
    Use tuna packed in water not oil. Add onion,celery and fresh parsley to it for more flavor if you like and use low fat or no fat yogurt instead of mayonaise.oh and black pepper,touch of sea salt.
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    Jul 16, 2010 3:51 PM GMT
    I'm fine with canned tuna. a 5 oz can of light tuna in water has about 26 grams of protein, which is great. With that protein, I think its ok to have a little fat. I use about 1 tablespoon of low fat mayo and then add jalapenos, onions and whole grain mustard til I get the right moisture. I started using natures own sandwich rounds rather than regualr sliced bread.
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    Jul 16, 2010 3:55 PM GMT
    i have always eat from the can, tuns is good for thou, about twice a week is plenty, because of its mercury level......
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    Jul 16, 2010 3:58 PM GMT
    Stopping doing the whole mayo, pickle, onion mixture a few years back. Now I just mix with low-fat cottage cheese. Eat it with tomato wedges or on ww bread. I like the idea of a lettuce wrap...may have to have that when I get home.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Jul 16, 2010 4:05 PM GMT
    check for mercury
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    Jul 16, 2010 4:08 PM GMT
    Thanks guys!
    All your suggestions sound great, i'll try them all. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jul 16, 2010 4:11 PM GMT
    This might sound gross, but I love tuna straight from the can as long as in refrigerator w/ some mustard. I find it a fast and easy protein source, cans are cheaper than the bags. You are just paying for the non can packaging; just beware that it attracts cats from both the can opener sound and the smell lol! At least it did for me.
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    Jul 16, 2010 6:56 PM GMT
    FRONT2BACK said[...] I like the idea of a lettuce wrap...may have to have that when I get home.


    Thanks for the great idea. I could imagine one of those tied closed with a scallion or chive 'leaf'.
  • me35mtl

    Posts: 306

    Jul 16, 2010 7:04 PM GMT
    i agree to avoid tuna in a can..but when i want a substitution for chips and dip i just take a can of tuna, put in a table spoon of low fat vegan mayo with a spoon full of regular onion dip (for flavor) with a bit of salt and pepper. Then i just have it with low fat crackers.. the stuff is addictive..
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    Jul 16, 2010 7:05 PM GMT
    danielryan said...I say ditch the can and go for the pouch type tuna now. The reason that canned tuna is so DISGUSTING is because they way it is packaged then heated to kill any bacteria make it tough, dry, and blah! The newer pouch type variety doesn't require as much heating and therefore leaves a better taste.

    I didn't know there was that difference in the way the tuna was prepared for those 2 different packaging methods! I thought those pouches were mainly about portion difference, lighter and more packable to carry, and easier for people to open away from home.

    Well, now I will try some, and see if I can detect a better taste than canned. The things I learn here! You guys are so damn smart & informed on so many subjects, I just love it!
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    Jul 16, 2010 7:09 PM GMT
    Take that jar of mayo and throw it out.

    Homemade mayo is so delicious it will make all other condiments obsolete. I make very small matches in a blender using olive oil so you get a very good fat with miles of taste.

    Alternatively, for that creaminess of tuna salad you could use nonfat yogurt.
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    Jul 16, 2010 7:37 PM GMT
    Vaalie505 said... just beware that it attracts cats from both the can opener sound and the smell lol! At least it did for me.

    OMG, don't I remember that! The cats would come racing in like crazy whenever the electric can opener was used. They could even hear the manual crank opener if they weren't too many rooms away.

    BTW, does anyone still use an electric can opener these days? All the rage back in the early '60s, but I know we also used canned stuff a lot more than today, much healthier & tastier ways now, at least for "people" food, pets notwithstanding. Plus with modern cooking who has counter space to waste on a silly gimmick you only use every few days for a moment?

    So poll: who keeps & uses an electric can opener on their countertop? I haven't seen one in a kitchen for years. Interesting reversal of so-called "technology" that we'd revert to a simpler hand-operated method.
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    Jul 16, 2010 8:37 PM GMT
    Tuna
    English Peas
    Baby Carrots
    Jalapeno
    A dash of Olive Oil (Buy the tuna in water)
    Sea Salt
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    Jul 16, 2010 8:39 PM GMT
    I actually mix the canned tuna with balsamic vinegar and mustard and some chopped up celery. It sounds awful, but it's healthy and not too bad.
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    Jul 16, 2010 9:10 PM GMT
    I love tuna,

    a bit of mayo and some relish with some bread and you've got a nice sandwich to eat. Add in some leafy greens and a tomato. You almost got a full meal.

    Or a quick snack straight outta the can.

    Non-bagged tuna is a bit more pricey and for what it's worth with all the chemicals I expose myself to at work I'm sure avoid mercury isn't doing to slow my days on this earth.
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Jul 16, 2010 9:19 PM GMT
    tuna, onion, celery, sliced almonds (toasted if you like), a few raisins and moisten with as little low-fat italian dressing as possible

    Good on lettuce with a wheaty cracker or two.
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    Jul 16, 2010 11:25 PM GMT
    Forget the canned tuna; try roasting a piece of fresh tuna and you'll never want to eat the disgusting canned stuff again!

    Buy a 1-2 lb. piece of fresh tuna from your local fish market. It should not have a strong smell, if it does don't buy it. Put a drop of olive oil on each side, rub it around with your fingers, add salt and pepper. Roast in the oven at 400 degrees until the fish is opaque and flakes easily with a fork - it shouldn't be more than ten minutes unless your piece of tuna is gigantic. Do NOT overcook! Cover with foil and let rest for ten minutes. Flake the tuna apart and use in your favorite recipe. Be careful to keep an eye on your portion size - this tuna will be so delicious you'll want to eat the whole thing in one sitting. Refrigerate the uneaten portions for up to two days.
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    Jul 16, 2010 11:44 PM GMT
    fastfreddie saidForget the canned tuna; try roasting a piece of fresh tuna and you'll never want to eat the disgusting canned stuff again!

    I remember as a kid when my father went out onto the Atlantic Ocean on his brother's fishing boat, and brought fresh tuna home he caught. And it was spectacular! Nothing like what you get in cans, I couldn't believe it was actually tuna, though I realize there are many types.

    And sometimes in restaurants I will get fresh tuna that is wonderful, even essentially raw like sushi. But, such pleasures can be pricey, and there are times when canned will do, especially if it's just going into a salad or a sandwich.

    Bottom line: I like tuna, I like most fish (well, truth be told, there's almost nothing I WON'T eat on a civilized menu). Eating tuna is a good & healthy thing in my opinion, and the only issue is the preparation. Go easy on the fat & cholesterol (regular mayo being a big offender), and you'll be OK.
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    Aug 27, 2010 12:44 AM GMT
    rightasrain saidif you eat albacore, you should eat no more than one serving per week (actually depends on your weight) due to mercury content. 'light' tuna (really darker than albacore) has less mercury, but either way since tuna is at the 'top of the food chain', it is full of human-concentrated toxins. sorry.... i love it too.

    'safe' eating recommendations:
    http://www.nrdc.org/health/effects/mercury/tuna.asp


    damn, didnt know that, luckily i usually buy skipjack or yellowfin light canned tunas. but i can eat two cans mixed with mayo and shredded cheese in a single sitting, let alone space them out over a week, lol. I know mayos bad but im skinny enough i dont care, im just in it for the protein and the calories. Im trying to hit 4000 a day, with some good success, but i feel like my metabolism is simply adjusting to the increase, if i hit 5 or 6000 a day, might that help? ive used supplement shakes in the past and actually lost weight, lol, so not sure how to proceed
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    Aug 27, 2010 12:50 AM GMT
    Canned tuna is fine when not eaten in excess. I like to mix in chopped almonds, apple, raisins, celery, and some mayo, de-fucking-licious!