Ancient Greek

  • brycetippe

    Posts: 688

    Jul 18, 2010 5:45 AM GMT
    This is a long shot, but does anyone know Ancient Greek?
    I'm a mythology nerd and have always had a huge affinity with Greek mythology.
    Well I've decided I wanted to get "Aphrodite" in Ancient Greek as a tattoo.
    But the problem as I've searched the net and can't find it.
    HELP? icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jul 18, 2010 5:53 AM GMT
    I'v watched Xena, and theres no ancient Greek that clearly helps him get "Aphrodite"'s name written in that language,

    I found this:

    http://karenswhimsy.com/public-domain-images/greek-alphabet/images/greek-alphabet-4.jpg

    and...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_alphabet

    Hope that gets to started...

    -Greg
  • brycetippe

    Posts: 688

    Jul 18, 2010 5:54 AM GMT
    gregmills87 saidI'v watched Xena, and theres no ancient Greek that clearly helps him get "Aphrodite"'s name written in that language,

    I found this:

    http://karenswhimsy.com/public-domain-images/greek-alphabet/images/greek-alphabet-4.jpg

    and...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_alphabet

    Hope that gets to started...

    -Greg

    Thank you so much. icon_smile.gif
  • brycetippe

    Posts: 688

    Jul 18, 2010 5:54 AM GMT
    VinceR77 saidDid you watch xena back in the day, lol.

    I did!
    icon_razz.gif
    And Hercules.
    But I studied Greek Mythology when I was younger in my own time.
    I'm weird I know.
  • brycetippe

    Posts: 688

    Jul 18, 2010 6:04 AM GMT
    cold said... You would get a internet sourced translation permanently tattooed on your body?

    I think 'Aphrodite' in ancient Greek is spelt 'naive' icon_wink.gif

    Um.
    Thanks for assuming that I'm retarded.
    I'm obviously going to do thorough research on it before I get something tattooed on my body.
    I was hoping for a picture or something from a book, not a translation from google. icon_evil.gif
  • brycetippe

    Posts: 688

    Jul 18, 2010 6:04 AM GMT
    VinceR77 saidI like ancient greek/ roman history too. Have you seen HBO Rome? icon_biggrin.gif

    Unfortunately i haven't.
    I don't watch much TV anymore.icon_sad.gif
  • Iluros

    Posts: 559

    Jul 18, 2010 7:12 AM GMT
    Ἀφροδίτη
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    Jul 18, 2010 9:21 AM GMT
    Ἀφροδίτη is what wiki says. I put it in caps for you, more like an inscription

    ΑΦΡΟΔΙΤΗ

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    Jul 18, 2010 11:44 AM GMT
    Why?
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    Jul 18, 2010 11:45 AM GMT
    UrsaMajor saidWhy?


    More original than "Mom", less scary than "death"
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    Jul 18, 2010 12:11 PM GMT
    Lostboy saidἈφροδίτη is what wiki says. I put it in caps for you, more like an inscription

    ΑΦΡΟΔΙΤΗ


    The OP wanted Ancient Greek.
    The ancients used only capital letters. Small letters and accent marks didn't come into use until Byzantine times. So Lostboy's suggestion is correct, as his usually are.
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    Jul 18, 2010 12:13 PM GMT
    Lostboy saidἈφροδίτη is what wiki says. I put it in caps for you, more like an inscription

    ΑΦΡΟΔΙΤΗ



    I love the CAPS one, the smaller letters dont look as good

    alpha, phi, rho, omicron, delta, iota, tau, eta, I belive this is
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    Jul 18, 2010 2:03 PM GMT
    brycetippe saidBut I studied Greek Mythology when I was younger in my own time.
    I'm weird I know.


    I did the same thing and still do from time to time. Look at some of Joseph Campbell's work if you haven't already.
  • DukeAtreides

    Posts: 64

    Jul 18, 2010 2:06 PM GMT
    From memory, Iluros is correct.

    That is, unless 6 semesters of Classical Greek have utterly failed me.
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    Jul 18, 2010 2:27 PM GMT
    I've studied Ancient Greek. But which type do you want? The Greek I studied was Homeric Greek...I think that's the most popular one.

    As for Aphrodite, I think it was Άφροδίτη. If I remember correctly, the breathing on the A, has to be curving to the left for it to be an 'A' sound. If the breathing curves to the right it would be wrong as it would be pronounced Haphrodite. The breathing is not an accent!

    Why don't you want her name in Modern Greek? Sorry I couldn't be much help; I could try and find a picture of her name so you know what the breathing looks like as it's not like apostrophe...

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    Jul 18, 2010 2:35 PM GMT
    See the inscription on the Nestor cup - one of the oldest surviving Greek inscriptions. The word Aphrodite is the last word (bottom left) - they wrote right to left:

    Nestorcup.jpg

    NC.inscr.rest.jpg

    and is transcribed as ΑΦΡΟΔΙΤΕΣ. You may want to ask someone knowledgeable of Greek for the correct case of the word. Nominative is probably just ΑΦΡΟΔΙΤΕ.
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    Jul 18, 2010 2:36 PM GMT
    Here ya go, this is Aphrodite's name spelt in Ancient Greek. I think that's what you wanted icon_confused.gif If you want to know anything about the mythology crap then don't ask me as I never cared about that stuff...I was only ever good at translations icon_razz.gif

    image053.jpg
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    Jul 18, 2010 2:40 PM GMT
    viveutvivas saidSee the inscription on the Nestor cup - one of the oldest surviving Greek inscriptions. The word Aphrodite is the last word (bottom left) - they wrote right to left:

    Nestorcup.jpg

    NC.inscr.rest.jpg

    and is transcribed as ΑΦΡΟΔΙΤΕΣ. You may want to ask someone knowledgeable of Greek for the correct case of the word.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nestor%27s_Cup


    Hmm, I'm not knowledgeable about Ancient Greek anymore but from all the Greek I learnt it was never spelt like that. It might be a more ancient version icon_confused.gif

    About the case, the name for your tattoo would definitely need to be in the nominative case. The one I gave is in the nominative case (but in Homeric Greek) I think.

    I think you should it in lower case cos it looks cooler lol icon_razz.gif
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    Jul 18, 2010 2:42 PM GMT
    Review this: http://www.behindthename.com/nmc/gre-anci.php

    Then call your local university and ask to talk to someone specializing in Ancient Greek (probably someone in History department or a prof in Theatre, sometimes they know Ancient Greek because of the tragedies).
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    Jul 18, 2010 2:45 PM GMT
    Well my question was actually serious. I would be curious to know the inspiration behind using the word Aphrodite as opposed to Hermes, Zephyr, Ganymede, etc.

    Lostboy said
    UrsaMajor saidWhy?


    More original than "Mom", less scary than "death"
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    Jul 18, 2010 2:47 PM GMT
    Fascinating idea. As others have mentioned the name in greek is Άφροδίτη. And I can confirm it because I am Greek from Greece. Ancient Greek letters and Modern Greek letters are the same in this particular word. Note that in caps we dont put an accent on the ι. Ancient Greek to Modern Greek didnt change all that much other than that the accents became more simplified and condensed to just one than 5 that was earlier.

    Caps: ΆΦΡΟΔΙΤΗ
    Lowercase: Άφροδίτη
    Pronunciation: aa-fro-thee-tee ....
    ("aa" like apple; "fro" like from; "th" like in The, that, this etc; "tee" as in t-shirt)

    hope that helps // cheers
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    Jul 18, 2010 2:51 PM GMT
    readr saidFascinating idea. As others have mentioned the name in greek is Άφροδίτη. And I can confirm it because I am Greek from Greece. Ancient Greek letters and Modern Greek letters are the same in this particular word. Note that in caps we dont put an accent on the ι. Ancient Greek to Modern Greek didnt change all that much other than that the accents became more simplified and condensed to just one than 5 that was earlier.

    Caps: ΆΦΡΟΔΙΤΗ
    Lowercase: Άφροδίτη
    Pronunciation: aa-fro-thee-tee ....
    ("aa" like apple; "fro" like from; "th" like in The, that, this etc; "tee" as in t-shirt)

    hope that helps // cheers


    Yay the mystery is solved!

    Greek is awesome.
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    Jul 18, 2010 3:17 PM GMT
    brycetippe saidThis is a long shot, but does anyone know Ancient Greek?
    I'm a mythology nerd and have always had a huge affinity with Greek mythology.
    Well I've decided I wanted to get "Aphrodite" in Ancient Greek as a tattoo.
    But the problem as I've searched the net and can't find it.
    HELP? icon_biggrin.gif

    Ignore these people. If you want it in really ancient Greek go for Linear B. ... icon_rolleyes.gif

    good book:
    http://tinyurl.com/3yn6cc9
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    Jul 18, 2010 3:20 PM GMT
    readr saidFascinating idea. As others have mentioned the name in greek is Άφροδίτη. And I can confirm it because I am Greek from Greece. Ancient Greek letters and Modern Greek letters are the same in this particular word. Note that in caps we dont put an accent on the ι. Ancient Greek to Modern Greek didnt change all that much other than that the accents became more simplified and condensed to just one than 5 that was earlier.

    Caps: ΆΦΡΟΔΙΤΗ
    Lowercase: Άφροδίτη
    Pronunciation: aa-fro-thee-tee ....
    ("aa" like apple; "fro" like from; "th" like in The, that, this etc; "tee" as in t-shirt)

    hope that helps // cheers


    Thanks. You remind me of a good friend of mine. We were buddies in college. I recall one thing he said at the time that has stuck with me, "whomever translated the New Testament from Greek obviously did not know Greek."

    He was a language major. I recall him studying Hebrew and Aramaic during the time he made the above comment.

    These days I think he has a professorship in Athens.
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    Jul 18, 2010 3:25 PM GMT
    twomack said I recall one thing he said at the time that has stuck with me, "whomever translated the New Testament from Greek obviously did not know Greek."

    if he said "whomever," he didn't know English.