Running hurts...

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 13, 2008 5:24 AM GMT
    So I've finally decided that it's going to take a combination of further reduced calorie intake and some actual running (not just the usual walking/jogging i usually do to lose my last bit of flab)..the problem is that after day two I feel incredible discomfort in my shins. Is there a muscle of something on the front of your leg? I don't know, but has anyone ever experienced that? Is there something I can do?
  • auryn

    Posts: 2061

    Feb 13, 2008 4:44 PM GMT
    sounds like you have shin splints (in short, micro tears in the connective tissue between your tibia and the muscles that attach to it) that need tending to.
    (this site is going to force me to bring my anatomy book to work.)

    also, what type of terrain are you running on pavement, paths, treadmills, or some other? How are your shoes? Are they made for cross training or running? the answer to these questions may help any trainers address your needs better.
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    Feb 13, 2008 4:57 PM GMT
    I'm running on pavement on a rolling hill like terrain..I wear nike shox..
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    Feb 13, 2008 5:09 PM GMT
    Make sure you're changing your shoes on a regular basis and try insoles, I have issues with Shin Splints as well however I have to alternate running every other week to give them a rest...
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    Feb 13, 2008 5:11 PM GMT
    I used to get shin splints pretty bad when I was marathon training the first time. I also wore NIKE shox. I switched to Asics shoes and have had much better luck. I also have to mix it up and run on the treadmill and stair machine in addition to outdoor running. Adding pilates or Yoga helps to stretch and strengthen the smaller connective fibers. Make sure you are stretching before and after you run. If it continues to hurt, do something else for a while. I ignored my symptoms and ended up having to wear an inflatable boot surrounded by plastic.
    You will also have to build your quads so that there is muscle balance between the front of the leg and the back.
    It's a lot of extra work for some people but few things have the ability to transform your body that quickly.
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    Feb 13, 2008 5:14 PM GMT
    Be warey of shin splints. You are likely not running properly. I had terrible shin splints and ended up having stress fractures that took months to heal. If possible I would join a running clinic. I did one a few months back and it completely changed the way I run for the better and prevented injury.

    I don't know how you run, but my problem was leading with my heel and not bending my knee enough to absorb the shock. You should land with the middle of your foor, knee at a slight bend. Running is really a shifting of balance and speed is technically determined by your lean. Most of the work is perfromed by your hamstring.

    When you strike on mid foot your next step is to pull your knee up and replacing with your other leg.Work on keeping light on your feet and mastering this exchange of balance through drills. also make sure you rest properly and do not push your self when injured. Stretching is vital, but worry less aboput loose muscles before a run as much as limber flexible joints.

    writing this is difficult, it is much easier shown in person. But look for a clinic. they will help you out.
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    Feb 13, 2008 5:22 PM GMT
    Thank ya'll for all the info. icon_smile.gif
  • Kevin82

    Posts: 273

    Feb 13, 2008 5:32 PM GMT
    Anterior Tibialis pain plus ice massage equals relief. Your ant tib could be weak due to tight gastrocs or should I save calf muscles. Stretch those guys and do some dorsi flexion excercises once the pain has been minimalized. That should balance you out and listen to the guys above too.
  • helium

    Posts: 378

    Feb 13, 2008 8:01 PM GMT
    Another tip when you're running on concrete is to try and run on the grass. That will not only absorb some of the shock to your feet from the concrete but it will help build some strength in your legs.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 13, 2008 8:14 PM GMT
    You may be doing too much too soon. It also might help to go to a running specialty store and get fitted with the proper shoes.
  • USMCjock

    Posts: 89

    Feb 15, 2008 5:38 AM GMT
    A fellow Marine asked me about my boring looking New Balance shoes. I told him they were $100, and he was shocked, because for $100 you could get some cool Nikes. NB is made in America, and is simply the best (for me), most comfortable running shoe. They are like running on air they are so shock- absorbing. I run 90% on pavement, and have never had painful shins. (6 miles/day, 3x week minuimum)
    Get the best shoes you can afford, and base it on FUNCTION, not style.
  • UStriathlete

    Posts: 320

    Feb 15, 2008 6:22 AM GMT
    www.chirunning.com get the book/dvd or do the clinic.

    relax your lower leg/ankles. short mid foot strike, NO heel strike. lift your heel and keep knees low. that's a start.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 15, 2008 3:48 PM GMT
    I run on a treadmill and I went to a speciality store to buy my running shoes. Shoes are very important in order to avoid problems. At this store ("The Running Room") they actually watched how I walked and ran, then suggested a pair of Nike shoes to wear. They also suggested I replace them after about 500 miles which for me is around 6 months. I never have problems and I run 3 to 3.5 miles almost every day.

    I do not run outside which I think also helps me in avoiding shin splints and sore knees. Running on pavement is very hard on the body. If I run outside I prefer a conservation area with gravel or dirt trails.
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    Feb 16, 2008 1:13 PM GMT
    ... and do not forget that your cardiovascular system adapts faster than your muscles, ligaments and joints.

    That means even if you feel like running some miles more would not be a challenge at all, be reasonable and give your "bones" time to adapt as well. Increase your running pensum gradually.

    You want to be able to run for at least the next 40 years, don't you? ;-)
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    Feb 17, 2008 1:04 AM GMT
    PLEASE...Help me out with some definitions and differences, symptoms and cures...
    "shin splints", "muscle strain", "cramps in the calf", "fallen arches"....and how do you know when a pair of shoes needs to be replaced, if they don't smell bad or "look bad"? Do inserts help? Are there any that are more recommended, and what can, or should, they do for you? Thanks.
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    Feb 17, 2008 10:38 AM GMT
    Sporty_g saidPLEASE...Help me out with some definitions and differences, symptoms and cures...
    "shin splints", "muscle strain", "cramps in the calf", "fallen arches"....


    I tend to a certain laziness in some points: ;-)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shin_splint
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strain_%28injury%29

    Cramps, in the world of sports, can be a consequence of either physical defective positions or a simple lack of magnesium. (I am not paying attention to poisoning or illnesses, that affect the central nervous system, now.)

    Sporty_g saidand how do you know when a pair of shoes needs to be replaced, if they don't smell bad or "look bad"?


    There is a rule of thumb saying every 1000 km it is time for a new pair. Well... and when your pair's broken, ruined, destroyed. ;-)

    Sporty_g saidDo inserts help?


    Nope. Inserts are made for stabilizing your feet. Whereas shoes are primarily made for cushioning effects.

    Sporty_g saidAre there any that are more recommended, and what can, or should, they do for you? Thanks.


    Shoes should fit your running style.
    Go find a good "running-store". They should be able to advise you on that question; in a better way than Internet can. :-)

    Sincerely
    BJ_C
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 17, 2008 11:19 PM GMT
    BJ_C....Thanks for the info... personal experinces?
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    Feb 18, 2008 12:01 AM GMT
    Throw away those Nike Shox first of all...ouch! Someone suggested a clinic - good idea. Someone suggested you might be doing too much too fast - also wise. Good shoes are a must. Talking to your physician first is also a must. Did I mention good, foot and gait appropriate shoes?
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    Feb 18, 2008 12:27 AM GMT
    As with other posts here, I agree that good shoes are an absolute must--buy shoes from a reputable athletic/running store. Talk to other runners and salespeople about the merits of different shoes. Avoid concrete surfaces if at all possible and use stretching and strength exercises for the lower leg. Ice and rest if shin splints become intolerable. Try cross training such as weight lifting and cycling for strength. Usually, finding the correct shoes for your running form and body build correct the problem. A rule of thumb is that running shoes should be replaced after 300-500+ miles. Good luck!
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    Feb 18, 2008 9:50 AM GMT
    Sporty_g saidBJ_C....Thanks for the info... personal experinces?


    You are very welcome.
    Personal experiences? Too many. ;-)