Moving across the US. Advice?

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    Jul 26, 2010 9:52 PM GMT
    I am from Las Vegas originally but in High School was forced to move to the midwest due to family circumstances. As I have gotten older and am now living on my own with no help from family, I have decided to move out of state and start a life somewhere else. I want to leave the midwest and hopefully find greener pastures - Without snow!

    Just wanted to get some feedback if anyone has picked up their life and moved somewhere out of state, I know I need to worry about job and housing, and so on - But does anyone have any tips as to how I even start the process? Money is limited for now but I plan to have enough saved by next summer for the move.

    Appreciate all positive feedback or helpful tips!
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    Jul 26, 2010 10:31 PM GMT
    Boy_Vegas saidI am from Las Vegas originally but in High School was forced to move to the midwest due to family circumstances. As I have gotten older and am now living on my own with no help from family, I have decided to move out of state and start a life somewhere else. I want to leave the midwest and hopefully find greener pastures - Without snow!

    Just wanted to get some feedback if anyone has picked up their life and moved somewhere out of state, I know I need to worry about job and housing, and so on - But does anyone have any tips as to how I even start the process? Money is limited for now but I plan to have enough saved by next summer for the move.

    Appreciate all positive feedback or helpful tips!


    I did....moving somewhere that you have some contacts that can help you is definitely helpful...Its hard to do everything by yourself when you arrive in a new city. Also,looking for a job BEFORE and living with roomates is always better to save money and meet new people.
    I always come back to Montreal in the end,but I am french-canadian so it's hard for me to move away and always speak english when its not my first language,so I cant really compare.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14391

    Jul 26, 2010 10:36 PM GMT
    You live in a very beautiful state and in a very beautiful city. Yes northern winters can get very long and depressing after awhile but Minnesota like the rest of the north has a beautiful four season climate. So what if you are not close to your immediate family that is no reason to leave Minneapolis. I live in Buffalo and most of my immediate family and some relatives live in the area but I am not close to them so I have a lot of friends and I keep busy. My family's close proximity is not a factor. You should do the exact same thing with your family and get out and enjoy the city that you reside in. Trust me, most sunbelt cities are not all what they are cracked up to be because I lived in one for almost ten years. When I got sick and damned tired of Austin, Texas on 05-01-01, I moved back home to Buffalo. So be thankful where you live because you could end up living in a real hellhole and believe me there are many hellholes in this country and throughout the world.
  • TexasBoeuf

    Posts: 68

    Jul 27, 2010 12:47 AM GMT
    I moved from Texas to San Francisco 4 years ago. I found a job out here before moving so it wasn't so bad, but it was still very stressful. Rent was so much higher, didn't know anyone, just happened to get a roommate and I didn't know him so wasn't sure how we'd get along. It all worked out and I couldn't be happier here.

    I know many people here, including my roommate, who just packed up and moved. He hitched from DC to SF when he was 19. I know many people who packed up and got a job at Starbucks until they could get a better job or apartment in SF...just got something to pay the bills.

    Plan it out, use Craigslist, and get a move on. You can always move back or somewhere else if you don't like it.
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    Jul 27, 2010 1:34 AM GMT
    I moved by myself from Kentucky to New York. My only advice is probably the most important because.. you can find a job.. and you can find a place to live.. but being SO far from friends and family, with no friends, no one to go see.. it get's lonely. And it takes serious time to build up friendships to the point where you can emotionally lean on someone and not seem like a total loser. It took me about 2 years to get -really- established here, and I still don't have friends like I did back home.

    So my advice is... that to pick up and move your life.. is hard. Really hard. And not everybody can handle it. When you have those moments where you want to say fuck it, pack the car and take off (and you will have those moments).. try to remember the significance of what you're doing, and what it means to you to be successful at it, and then stay, or go. But be committed.

    Good luck. icon_smile.gif
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    Jul 27, 2010 2:32 AM GMT
    Hey, I just moved from Buffalo, New York (where RoadBikeBob and the awesomelicious KentukyTuss live) to Portland, Oregon.

    Things are tough right now in cities. The economy is awful in almost all of them with high unemployment and lots of competition for what few jobs are available. Managers are going to look at your resume and throw it in the shredder if you don't live in town. So here is how I did it:

    Do a butt load of research. Find out who are the big employers in town what they do, what they stand for, and what the culture is like. HR can smell a generic cover letter a mile away and presenting one with a local address, a local phone number, and a cover letter that is as much about you as it is about them will move you up the pile a bit.

    Have enough money to live for six months. You are not going to find a job the first day you are there. You will need money to live on for a while. And, should you get a job after a month, you have five month's worth of savings to throw a fabulous party with. Woot!

    Find out where to live. One of your biggest costs will be rent. Finding a safe neighborhood where you can live, preferably with roommates, will keep that down.

    While you are not working, work harder than you ever have. You will need to send out a dozen custom applications a day. Custom letter head. Custom resume. That means a lot of research, reading, and writing.

    Good luck. If you decide to move to Portland and need a couch to sleep on I promise not to ruffie you.
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Jul 27, 2010 2:46 AM GMT
    I really second finding a job first, then moving. In this economy, it's not easy to just assume that the job will fall into place.
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    Jul 27, 2010 3:30 AM GMT
    KentuckyTuss saidI moved by myself from Kentucky to New York. My only advice is probably the most important because.. you can find a job.. and you can find a place to live.. but being SO far from friends and family, with no friends, no one to go see.. it get's lonely. And it takes serious time to build up friendships to the point where you can emotionally lean on someone and not seem like a total loser. It took me about 2 years to get -really- established here, and I still don't have friends like I did back home.

    So my advice is... that to pick up and move your life.. is hard. Really hard. And not everybody can handle it. When you have those moments where you want to say fuck it, pack the car and take off (and you will have those moments).. try to remember the significance of what you're doing, and what it means to you to be successful at it, and then stay, or go. But be committed.

    Good luck. icon_smile.gif

    I definately agree with this. I moved from Michigan to Phoenix and it was very rough. I was lucky enough to be able to transfer with my job, so that was not a problem. I sold my house and here I came. I knew a couple of people who lived here, but they moved a couple of months after I got here. I knew no one and it was really tough making new friends. I now have some friends, but it has been really tough being away from my family. I did not really see them much, but I was able to always see them when I needed to.
    I also agree with the others who said to find a job first. It is tough to find a job anywhere these days. So I would say go there and find a job first as it will be hard to find one without a local address and phone number. I have been thinking about moving again and have sent resumes via job boards. I have been getting some phone interviews, but not much else. You will need a good cover letter to explain your move and experience and you will need to go there to interview in person. If you do not find a job first, have about 8 months worth of expenses in savings.

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    Jul 27, 2010 3:46 AM GMT
    Boy_Vegas saidI am from Las Vegas originally but in High School was forced to move to the midwest due to family circumstances. As I have gotten older and am now living on my own with no help from family, I have decided to move out of state and start a life somewhere else. I want to leave the midwest and hopefully find greener pastures - Without snow!

    Just wanted to get some feedback if anyone has picked up their life and moved somewhere out of state, I know I need to worry about job and housing, and so on - But does anyone have any tips as to how I even start the process? Money is limited for now but I plan to have enough saved by next summer for the move.

    Appreciate all positive feedback or helpful tips!


    At 22, just leaving for the sake of leaving may not be the most prudent. At 22, that may not mean much to you.

    Ideally, you'll have a plan for success and a soft landing.

    Folks are MUCH different in The South than in The Twin Cities.

    Right now, you should concentrate on your hire-ablility, be it through education, or on-the-job experience. Moving to another city and working at a low paying service job away from family and friends could be a long road, and one that you should be able to avoid.

    You need to choose a destination based upon how it fits with your skill set, and personal tastes. No person here can do that for you.

    Some places, such as Dallas / Fort Worth have robust economies, but, are trashy and a grind to live in with bad air, stupid and rude people, and so on.

    Either coast will cost you nearly 2 to 3 times as much to live as where you are, and you won't make that much more money unless you're highly skilled in a particular discipline. I.e., your money will go further right where you are.

    If you move to a big city you should be prepared for costs for things like rent and insurance to EXPLODE, especially if you go to either coast.

    I understand that you may well have some-place-else-itis, but, you'd do well to plan, and make provisions for a soft landing.

    Without skills, or a gimme job, you'll be stuck competing in the market wherever you head for a menial job. In The South and The West, in major areas those menial jobs will mean competing with a labor market that works on the cheap and often doesn't speak English.
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    Jul 27, 2010 3:51 AM GMT
    I'm an adventure-seeker.
    Once I got my commercial pilot license, I dropped college, cashed in my 401K, and moved to the city I'd dreamed of living ever since I was an early teen: Miami.

    It was a bitch to find work, but once I did I've been happy here ever since.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 27, 2010 3:55 AM GMT
    Yep. Sometimes, you live dangerously.
  • cacti

    Posts: 273

    Jul 27, 2010 4:12 AM GMT
    A lot of great advice already, but I'll share my experience as I was in your shoes almost exactly a year ago, and this is how it has panned out so far:


    Grew up and lived in southern Indiana until I was 27- had a pretty decent job that was in the field I wanted to be in. But it was pretty much dead-end at that point, and if I wanted to go on to do bigger/better things, I was going to have to spread my wings. The final push was my long distance relationship with a boy in Seattle.

    So last July, after quitting my job, I picked up and drove across the country with everything I could fit in my (tiny) car. My boyfriend was the only person I knew in Seattle, and I moved in with him as soon as I got there. Found a low paying job after a few weeks.

    After a year, I am now first getting my first real(kindof) job, but it's still not really what I want to be doing. But for me, the Pacific Northwest(and esp. Seattle) trumps any financial difficulty I have had so far. I still feel I made the right decision, but I think it only worked out for me because I had someone close to have things set up for me.. to lean on. Regardless of where you're moving and what your skillset/education are, it's still a really rough time to uproot yourself and look for work. I don't want to discourage you(in fact QUITE the opposite) but you definitely need to make sure you have back up plans.

    And as others have said: I strongly recommend that you go somewhere with friends you have great trust in. icon_wink.gif
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    Jul 27, 2010 5:11 PM GMT
    roadbikeRob saidYou live in a very beautiful state and in a very beautiful city. Yes northern winters can get very long and depressing after awhile but Minnesota like the rest of the north has a beautiful four season climate. So what if you are not close to your immediate family that is no reason to leave Minneapolis. I live in Buffalo and most of my immediate family and some relatives live in the area but I am not close to them so I have a lot of friends and I keep busy. My family's close proximity is not a factor. You should do the exact same thing with your family and get out and enjoy the city that you reside in. Trust me, most sunbelt cities are not all what they are cracked up to be because I lived in one for almost ten years. When I got sick and damned tired of Austin, Texas on 05-01-01, I moved back home to Buffalo. So be thankful where you live because you could end up living in a real hellhole and believe me there are many hellholes in this country and throughout the world.


    I thank you for your advice, but there are many reasons I have decided to leave. Even if I just had one reason, I think one is more than enough. I understand no place will be perfect and every place has its share of crappy weather, but the move is about the adventure of living life somewhere new, not staying in a comfort zone because I'm too afraid to experience life. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jul 27, 2010 5:13 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidI'm an adventure-seeker.
    Once I got my commercial pilot license, I dropped college, cashed in my 401K, and moved to the city I'd dreamed of living ever since I was an early teen: Miami.

    It was a bitch to find work, but once I did I've been happy here ever since.


    I love that! You are my moving hero. icon_eek.gif