Sunscreen... What SPF?

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    Jul 29, 2010 10:01 PM GMT
    So, I'll be going to the South Carolina shore next week to spend time with my family, and you can bet I'll be laying on the beach all day, every day. I want to get a tan, but I'm not sure what SPF sunscreen to get.... what do you all recommend?

    I'm half Greek, so I tan well, and currently have a good farmer's tan going on from riding icon_biggrin.gif But the rest of my body is pretty pale and I don't want to burn... what do you think?
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    Jul 30, 2010 12:45 AM GMT
    If you are there for a week and going to the beach each day I would recommend SPF 30. There's really not much benefit to SPF higher than that.
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    Jul 30, 2010 1:03 AM GMT
    Anything between 20-30 should be fine. Just remember to apply often. Don't forget your lips.
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    Jul 30, 2010 1:09 AM GMT
    madtown saidIf you are there for a week and going to the beach each day I would recommend SPF 30. There's really not much benefit to SPF higher than that.


    Well, I dunno about that, I read that a SPF 30 is like a SPF 10 when you apply it because no one applies it perfectly, so I'd recommend a 70+, it's not that expensive!! I'd rather spend a few bucks more than become a prune
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    Jul 30, 2010 1:13 AM GMT
    devilish_intentions said
    madtown saidIf you are there for a week and going to the beach each day I would recommend SPF 30. There's really not much benefit to SPF higher than that.


    Well, I dunno about that, I read that a SPF 30 is like a SPF 10 when you apply it because no one applies it perfectly, so I'd recommend a 70+, it's not that expensive!! I'd rather spend a few bucks more than become a prune


    From a New York Times article on the benefits of SPF higher than 30:

    "Studies over the years have shown that sunscreen with an SPF, or sun protection factor, of 30 blocks about 97 percent of ultraviolet rays. A rating of 15 means 93 percent of UV rays are blocked, and anything higher than 30 remains in the 97 or 98 percent range.

    In 1999 the Food and Drug Administration recommended that sunscreens with an SPF higher than 30 be labeled '30+,' mostly to prevent people from developing a false sense of security that might lead them to spend more time in the sun.

    What many people do not realize is that the amount of sunscreen applied plays an enormous role. A study in The British Journal of Dermatology this year found that applying less than two ounces over the entire body at one time can leave people with an SPF rating far lower than what is on the bottle. Some studies have shown that people typically apply just 10 percent of the amount recommended.

    THE BOTTOM LINE

    Above SPF 30, the increased protection is minimal."

    Here's a link to the article: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/07/health/07real.html?_r=1
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    Jul 30, 2010 1:14 AM GMT
    An SPF of 30 would give you about 93% coverage. An SPF of about 70 gives you 98%.
    However, you are correct, most people don't apply enough.
  • calibro

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    Jul 30, 2010 2:02 AM GMT
    depends on how well it filters uv-a and uv-b... just because it's spf 30 doesn't mean they filter both at a good rate.
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    Jul 30, 2010 2:09 AM GMT
    How long can you stay out in the sun without any sunscreen before you start to burn - even slightly? If it is, say 20 minutes, then you'll want an SPF of at least 3 and probably more for each hour you spend outside. Therefore, if you are going to be spending the entire day outside (let's say 12 hours) then you'll want at least SPF 36 to start. Actually, you might want to start with something higher, like SPF 45, since the sunscreen will likely wash off or rub off and most of us aren't great at reapplying it.
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    Jul 30, 2010 2:21 AM GMT
    madtown said
    devilish_intentions said
    madtown saidIf you are there for a week and going to the beach each day I would recommend SPF 30. There's really not much benefit to SPF higher than that.


    Well, I dunno about that, I read that a SPF 30 is like a SPF 10 when you apply it because no one applies it perfectly, so I'd recommend a 70+, it's not that expensive!! I'd rather spend a few bucks more than become a prune


    From a New York Times article on the benefits of SPF higher than 30:

    "Studies over the years have shown that sunscreen with an SPF, or sun protection factor, of 30 blocks about 97 percent of ultraviolet rays. A rating of 15 means 93 percent of UV rays are blocked, and anything higher than 30 remains in the 97 or 98 percent range.

    In 1999 the Food and Drug Administration recommended that sunscreens with an SPF higher than 30 be labeled '30+,' mostly to prevent people from developing a false sense of security that might lead them to spend more time in the sun.

    What many people do not realize is that the amount of sunscreen applied plays an enormous role. A study in The British Journal of Dermatology this year found that applying less than two ounces over the entire body at one time can leave people with an SPF rating far lower than what is on the bottle. Some studies have shown that people typically apply just 10 percent of the amount recommended.

    THE BOTTOM LINE

    Above SPF 30, the increased protection is minimal."

    Here's a link to the article: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/07/health/07real.html?_r=1


    2. Even if it has a high SPF factor it may not actually be giving you that amount of protection. For example, SPF 50+ may only be giving you SPF 20 because you haven't applied enough (i.e. not thickly enough and not covering all parts of your skin) or because you don't re-apply it often enough (every 2 hours) or after swimming.

    Source: http://insanestar.pointblog.co.uk/Are-you-using-sunscreen-correctly-.html
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    Jul 30, 2010 4:15 AM GMT
    Chemical sunscreens only stay active for 2-4 hours. Mineral sunscreens don't lose their activity until they are washed off. That's another thing to consider.

    1) Always, always, always use mineral sunscreens on your face.
    2) SPF 30 is always fine, but 1teaspoon should cover about 1'X1' on your body.
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    Jul 31, 2010 1:47 AM GMT
    madtown saidIf you are there for a week and going to the beach each day I would recommend SPF 30. There's really not much benefit to SPF higher than that.
    The only noticeable advantage of going over SPF 30 is with prolonged exposure, such as working in the sun all day.

    I'm in the sun 5+ hours/day and will not use less than SPF 50, and will not use off brands. I ONLY use the best I can find...price is no objective.
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    Jul 31, 2010 1:56 AM GMT
    Thanks for the advice guys. Well, since I don't burn very easily, I'm planning on going with SPF15 for my body, and SPF30 for my face and the back of my neck, just to be safe. We'll see how it goes. icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jul 31, 2010 1:58 AM GMT
    cold saidI would recommend SPFdon'tlieinthesunallday +


    Hahaha, well, it's just for a week... it's my chance to not be a total ghost all year round. My sister is a lifeguard and is tan as hell, so I know I've got it in my genes to get a decent tan! Lol...
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    Jul 31, 2010 6:09 AM GMT
    cold saidI would recommend SPFdon'tlieinthesunallday +
    I had SPF 50 caked on me and accidentally fell asleep on the beach for four hours...midday...without a cloud in the sky. When I woke, the guys next to me started laughing at me, saying how burned I'm gonna be.

    I barely even turned pink. icon_wink.gif

    Edit: Oh and I was nekkid, with sunblock on my dick too.
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    Jul 31, 2010 6:12 AM GMT
    From the actual amount of light blocked, everything higher than 15 is the same. The only difference is that higher SPFs don't require as much reapplication due to thickness/density of absorption.

    I learned everything I needed to know after a sunburn left me hospitalized at age 7 with 2nd degree burns over 25% of my skin's surface area and almost killed me with blood poisoning.
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    Jul 31, 2010 6:22 AM GMT
    For mineral sunscreen, look for zinc oxide or titanium dioxide in the ingredients list.

    I can't remember the goods and bads of chemical sunscreens, but I did a lot of research about it a few years ago and came to the conclusion that Ombrelle was a good, mid-price sunscreen -- Ombrelle baby even better. La Roche Posay is great too, but more expensive.

    It's better to rely on mineral ingredients too because there is evidence that chemical sunscreen molecules absorb radiation, expand, explode, and release free radicals in themselves.
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    Jul 31, 2010 7:08 AM GMT
    kandsk saidFor mineral sunscreen, look for zinc oxide or titanium dioxide in the ingredients list.

    I can't remember the goods and bads of chemical sunscreens, but I did a lot of research about it a few years ago and came to the conclusion that Ombrelle was a good, mid-price sunscreen -- Ombrelle baby even better. La Roche Posay is great too, but more expensive.

    It's better to rely on mineral ingredients too because there is evidence that chemical sunscreen molecules absorb radiation, expand, explode, and release free radicals in themselves.


    EXACTLY

    There's so many mineral sunscreens out there. Just google it. The thing with mineral sunscreen is that they really don't get higher than SPF15 without the use of chemical sunscreen added. That's not really a problem considering they reflect UVB/UVA rays. Chemical sunscreens absorbs UVB/UVA rays, and this is why they become unreactive after a short time.

    You might look a little pasty and white in pictures, but it's better than having age spots and saggy skin when you're older.