Asian Stereotypes

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    Aug 03, 2010 1:29 AM GMT
    Each of us pay a price when we face the obstacles of stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination. Many of us have parents and other ancestors who have faced and overcome extreme stereotypes. We then can be more able to overcome similar and greater challenges. We can gather valuable experience and share across generations, so that all might be inspired to stand accomplish more as in any endeavor in life.
    In your opinion...
    1. What are the Asian stereotypes, and how have they changed in the last decade?
    2. What stereotypes have Asians perpetuated or shatter?
    3. If you are Asian, what did you experience when you pushed the boundaries of perceptions?
    4. How did a stereotype impact your career or personal relationships?
    5. How do you think Asian stereotypes will change in the next decade?
    6. If you were part of a public relations firm hired to change the perception of Asian Americans, what would be the three top messages that you would communicate?

    Thanks for any input and insight that anyone can provide.
    Aloha and Be Well!
    Alan

    UPDATE 8/2/2010 1805HST: For clarification...
    1. I deliberately did not specify a particular national origin because there may be different stereotypes for different nationalities.
    2. Try to answer the questions from your own experience and point of view. You don't even have to be Asian to have a point of view.
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    Aug 03, 2010 3:40 AM GMT
    1. What are the Asian stereotypes, and how have they changed in the last decade?
    2. What stereotypes have Asians perpetuated or shatter?
    3. If you are Asian, what did you experience when you pushed the boundaries of perceptions?
    4. How did a stereotype impact your career or personal relationships?
    5. How do you think Asian stereotypes will change in the next decade?
    6. If you were part of a public relations firm hired to change the perception of Asian Americans, what would be the three top messages that you would communicate?

    I'm 1/4 SouthKorean but I look Latino I'll still answer the questions

    1. Asian women are docile and submissive while men are effeminate and undesirable (these are the stereotypes I don't think that)
    2. I think Asian actors have perpetuated the stereotype of Asians all knowing karate/martial arts and speaking English with an accent even if they were born here (I'm referring to how Asian characters are portrayed in the media). For example, Eva Longoria said she didn't like stereotypes that she souldn't play a maid cuz she's Latina, I agree with her wholeheartedly.
    3.I might be part Asian but people don't judge me as an Asian cuz I don't look Asian.
    4. Fortunately, it hasn't, well maybe positively cuz gay guys tell me, you're Latino, so hot, love Latin bois haha so that's not something negative.
    5. I don't know, there has to be more diversity on TV, movies, etc. Asians are the most underrepresented group.
    6. That they're like everyone else, they're not all nerds, Asian men can be masculine like any other race.
  • Buddha

    Posts: 1767

    Aug 03, 2010 3:54 AM GMT
    GAMRican saidEach of us pay a price when we face the obstacles of stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination. Many of us have parents and other ancestors who have faced and overcome extreme stereotypes. We then can be more able to overcome similar and greater challenges. We can gather valuable experience and share across generations, so that all might be inspired to stand accomplish more as in any endeavor in life.
    In your opinion...
    1. What are the Asian stereotypes, and how have they changed in the last decade?
    2. What stereotypes have Asians perpetuated or shatter?
    3. If you are Asian, what did you experience when you pushed the boundaries of perceptions?
    4. How did a stereotype impact your career or personal relationships?
    5. How do you think Asian stereotypes will change in the next decade?
    6. If you were part of a public relations firm hired to change the perception of Asian Americans, what would be the three top messages that you would communicate?

    Thanks for any input and insight that anyone can provide.
    Aloha and Be Well!
    Alan


    Hard to say. Unfortunately, I can not think of a single stereotype that goes for all Asians; which would be, Russians, Chinese, Japanese, Indians, Malaysian, Arabic and many many more groups of people.Will you be more specific of what type of Asian you are asking about or is one just, as in many cases, should people just automatically think of East Asia?
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    Aug 03, 2010 4:13 AM GMT
    buddha_the_god said
    Hard to say. Unfortunately, I can not think of a single stereotype that goes for all Asians; which would be, Russians, Chinese, Japanese, Indians, Malaysian, Arabic and many many more groups of people.Will you be more specific of what type of Asian you are asking about or is one just, as in many cases, should people just automatically think of East Asia?


    Hey BTG!

    Thanks for your question in regards to "generalzation". It's a good point that not all Asians are the same.
    I added some clarification in the OP. Hope you might share your thoughts, feelings, experiences, and foresight.
    Also, I was also assuming that I was going to get a predominantly "North American" response. So, your insight as (I'm assuming) a European would be quite valuable to hear.
    Aloha and Be Well!
    Alan
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Aug 03, 2010 4:14 AM GMT
  • shoelessj

    Posts: 511

    Aug 03, 2010 4:18 AM GMT
    bad drivers? good students?

    or so i've heard.
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    Aug 03, 2010 4:24 AM GMT
    calibro said...(video)...


    This was a great video. What I saw were people doing impressions of people. And, some of the impressions were better than others.

    Also, I noticed that whoever was on screen, I tried to picture a caucasian, hispanic, african, or other kind of "head" on the shoulders...and I could.

    The dress, the mannerisms, the language was generally what I would expect to see with young people in a modern English speaking country.

    Thanks! You've helped me to see more distinction in Diversity!
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    Aug 03, 2010 4:25 AM GMT
    shoelessj saidbad drivers? good students?

    or so i've heard.


    Wow! Yes! Those are impressions that I have, especially living here in Honolulu. The drivers are TOO courteous. You get to a four way stop, and nobody wants to go first. I never thought of the "driving" dimension to Asian stereotypes. Thanks!
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    Aug 03, 2010 4:26 AM GMT
    Interesting topic. I'm best friends with the former director of the Austin Asian American Film Fest and have worked on the festival for the last 3 years. Last year we shot trailers for the festival playing on the stereotypes of the Asian community. Sort of a subversive use of those images to make a point. They may still be up on the site at Http:/www.aaaff.org
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    Aug 03, 2010 4:51 AM GMT
    RudeMech saidInteresting topic. I'm best friends with the former director of the Austin Asian American Film Fest and have worked on the festival for the last 3 years. Last year we shot trailers for the festival playing on the stereotypes of the Asian community. Sort of a subversive use of those images to make a point. They may still be up on the site at Http:/www.aaaff.org


    Email for you. Thanks for the link!
    Here's the "Teaser Trailer". It's great!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X8-nmQc-EgE
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    Aug 03, 2010 5:30 AM GMT
    Asian stereotypes? Hmmmm....
    1) We're all effeminate bottoms
    2) We're submissive
    3) We're underendowed

    There, I said it, I called out the pink elephant.
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    Aug 03, 2010 5:32 AM GMT
    GAMRican said
    In your opinion...
    1. What are the Asian stereotypes, and how have they changed in the last decade?
    2. What stereotypes have Asians perpetuated or shatter?
    3. If you are Asian, what did you experience when you pushed the boundaries of perceptions?
    4. How did a stereotype impact your career or personal relationships?
    5. How do you think Asian stereotypes will change in the next decade?
    6. If you were part of a public relations firm hired to change the perception of Asian Americans, what would be the three top messages that you would communicate?


    (Note: I'm generally defining "Asians" as those being Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Indian and the island states in the Pacific Ocean before reaching Australia. I'm also looking at this from a Vancouver, BC, Canada point of view where there is a rather large "Asian" demographic.)

    1. Asians stereotypically talk exceptionally loud (conversing with each other) while in public, have "poor" driving skills, and have exceptionally high expectations for their children. Also, young women (predominantly Chinese, Japanese, and Korean) have a "cutesy, school-girl" charm about them. I can't help you with the second question though. Not old enough to have seen any change.

    2. Asians typically perpetuate the "high expectations for their children" stereotype out of necessity because of the huge population back in their home countries and the highly competitive job market for high-paying careers. In general, that attitude is brought over when they emigrate.

    3. Regardless of what ethnic you are, anytime you push the boundaries of perceptions, you'll see a general sense of amazement (because you've "surprised" them by your ability) which can also be interpreted as confusion because of the disruption of "norms".

    4. Because I live in a city with a lot of immigrants, people sometimes assume that because I'm Asian I'm unable to comprehend and orate in English.

    5. I would hope that Asian stereotypes may not be as striking as they are currently perceived, but stereotypes tend to persist for a while. I'm not holding my breath for any big measurable change.

    6. At the end of the day, the main message is that Asian people are like everyone else; we cover the entire spectrum of "normal" including both extremes. Stereotypes, while often "justified" because of experience, can be rather demeaning.
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    Aug 03, 2010 5:33 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidHym...stereotypes regarding Asians. My experience has been:

    1. Years ago I used to work at a hospital and dealt with a lot of female Asian nurses. They came off as cold and not very friendly, an insularity about them was very obvious.

    2. I've known a few Korean Americans since first grade. They always seemed quite nice. I always found Korean women to be attractive, their pale milky skin with beautiful black hair and dark brown eyes.

    3. They tend to be quitter than most other groups. In contrast, Spaniards and a lot of Latinos are obnoxiously loud. I would rather sit next to a table of Asian people than next to group of annoying Spanish/Latin people. And I am half Spanish/Mexican so for you Latinos; don't feel insulted. You know it's true. icon_cool.gif

    4. In all the major cities I have ever visited I have never seen a homeless Asian person. They are mainly white or black, especially in Chicago.

    5. They seem to be committed to family and support each other more than any other ethnic group, from my observation.

    6. They generally seem to exude a sense serenity than most other people. However, just the other day, an Asian guy insulted my receding hairline, called me ass hat and repeatedly implied that I was stupid. I have never seen an Asian react this way, but I suspect he is also Latino. You know how hot headed those Latinos can get (see #3 above). But, given the day and time of his comments (around midnight on a Friday night) I can only suspect that some sort of substance like alcohol or "?" was somehow involved in radically altering this man's otherwise docile, upbeat and friendly disposition.


    HAHAHA Good thing you're half Spanish/Mexican cuz my blood was starting to boil lol
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    Aug 03, 2010 5:36 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said...
    6. They generally seem to exude a sense serenity than most other people. However, just the other day, an Asian guy insulted my receding hairline, called me ass hat and repeatedly implied that I was stupid. I have never seen an Asian react this way, but I suspect he is also Latino. You know how hot headed those Latinos can get (see #3 above). But, given the day and time of his comments (around midnight on a Friday night) I can only suspect that some sort of substance like alcohol or "?" was somehow involved in radically altering this man's otherwise docile, upbeat and friendly disposition.


    LOL! icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif

    Touche, MMTM! But no substances, just plain orneriness. I'm already as wacky as a shit house loon, I can't describe how crazed I might be on substances. icon_biggrin.gif.

    Thanks, MMTM, for your input. Your perceptions are of value to me. I appreciate your sharing them. Thanks for being the "bigger man" and putting aside my insults to you and sharing the "good stuff" on this thread. Mahalo! icon_biggrin.gif

    A little more information for all on why I'm asking these odd questions.

    I have the opportunity to share insight on the questions that I asked above, during a panel discussion at the National Association of Asian American Professionals convention in San Francisco next month. I have already answered these questions from my own perspective in a fairly long narrative. I'm now attempting to glean insight from a variety of virtual online communities, and in real life communities before the discussion.

    Thank you to all who have answered so far. You have contributed to an effort to help thousands of people to better understand diversity so that we might leverage the best, and minimize the worst (like I was towards MMTM the other night).

    Perceptions, whether from experience, hearsay, or just ignorance, are as good as real. And, learning how we are perceived, how we perceive, can help us all to understand each other. icon_lol.gif

    Aloha and Be Well!
    Alan
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    Aug 03, 2010 6:13 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    devilish_intentions said

    HAHAHA Good thing you're half Spanish/Mexican cuz my blood was starting to boil lol


    Down, Tiger! Down! icon_cool.gif

    Years ago when I lived in Spain I was studying for an exam and was staying in Salamanca. It is a huge college community due the prestigious university located in this town. Ugh..every night until about 4am they were hanging out on the streets driving me insane yelling and carrying on like it was a party every night.


    LOL what are you talking about? we Latinos are not loud nor hot-headed, we don't yell either pffffft LOL icon_razz.gif
  • beaujangle

    Posts: 1701

    Aug 03, 2010 6:43 AM GMT
    Here in Australia, the stereotype image of an Asian persists. If you watch Australian programmes, it appears as though the nation is 100% white. On tv, you rarely or almost never see an Asian actor in Australian programmes, news or commercials. However, on Beauty & the Geek (Aussie version), you see not one but at least 2 Asian geeks. Yes, I feel insulted.
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    Aug 03, 2010 6:48 AM GMT
    Thanks, for posting this thread very interesting.

    1. What are the Asian stereotypes, and how have they changed in the last decade?

    I worked in the sciences area for 15 years and always interacting in different facets with different Asians from different countries, so of course the stereotype that all Asians in the scientific area excel and are good at it. This is true in some cases: dedication, hardworking, insightful, but not always true. Sometimes, you also hear the dissatisfaction of their career, because their parents forced them to enter the sciences because of money, position within their family (first born), etc. It is definitely sad since some feel trap by their own culture with no individual say to change so they keep the status quo in view of disappointing to the family, their responsibility is a no,no.


    For the 2nd generation, Asian American is quiet different in a sense…they are more independent, more outspoken sometimes, but still there is a war of duality in cultures in retaining the old and the new American culture.

    2. What stereotypes have Asians perpetuated or shatter?

    From having worked closely with the culture, there is always a ‘sense’ that their analysis, position is always correct; or leading to the correct conclusion, when challenged they feel offended because is hard to differentiate between what is being presented the work itself, rather…. the individual presenting the presentation…their biggest asset turnouts to be their biggest nemesis…the inability to differentiate between the role and the person in essence is taking very personal, which many times destroys their main point that they are trying to convey.

    3. If you are Asian, what did you experience when you pushed the boundaries of perceptions?

    Not Asian

    4. How did a stereotype impact your career or personal relationships?

    Being of mixed herritage (Latin/British)…and growing up in different countries, I was raised with the idea of integration of ideas and working together. This is not the case when working with this culture. It is a very homogeneous culture, outsiders are still seen as foreigners, the word integration is not conducive in their nature. Actions have always spoken louder than words.

    5. How do you think Asian stereotypes will change in the next decade?

    I think they will continue as they are…you still have a strong family bond of the old and the new culture trying to dominate one another.
  • kew1

    Posts: 1595

    Aug 03, 2010 6:56 AM GMT
    According to the tour guide of a holiday I went on once, he found the Japanese accident prone. He was worried because we were going quad-biking.
    There were 2 accidents as a couple of the Japanese women drove into trees.
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    Aug 03, 2010 7:00 AM GMT
    GigoloAssassin saidAsian stereotypes? Hmmmm....
    1) We're all effeminate bottoms
    2) We're submissive
    3) We're underendowed

    There, I said it, I called out the pink elephant.


    Those are most certainly some stereotypes I have observed.

    From the standpoint of your age, what differences do you see in other generations? How do you see it unfolding for your generation?
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    Aug 03, 2010 7:02 AM GMT
    kew1 saidAccording to the tour guide of a holiday I went on once, he found the Japanese accident prone. He was worried because we were going quad-biking.
    There were 2 accidents as a couple of the Japanese women drove into trees.


    Do you think it is because they weren't paying attention? Or, that they had never ridden a bike? Or, some other factor? What do you think might be the root cause?
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    Aug 03, 2010 7:04 AM GMT
    There are caucasians, blacks, and latinos. Then there are asians, the forgotten race. Everyone knows they're there, but people don't pay as much attention to them as the others. In the US, I think that society still has a difficult becoming accustomed to seeing an Asian in a role of authority or celebrity or fame or notoriety or success, akin to their white, black or latino counterparts. Their tendencies are more low-key and quiet confidence. I do believe the trend is starting to change, but it will still be many decades before Asians will be "on par" with the others with regard to public image.

    With regards to looks alone, "pure" Asians typically aren't the Asians perceived as the "hot" or "beautiful" ones. Many of the Asians with that type of visibility are of mixed race, whether they admit on their biographical profiles or not. I'm sure many may argue that point, but that is my personal experience with the matter.
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    Aug 03, 2010 7:13 AM GMT
    I am full Japanese, but I had a very different experience growing up than most asians mainly because I am 4th generation. Here in Seattle, the Japanese American population is pretty tightly knit, mainly because a section of Seattle was pretty much considered the asian ghetto. Thus creating a small community where people relied on each other. All my close Japanese friends I have known my whole life, and our parents, and grandparents are friends of one another.

    Me and my close Japanese American friends definitely break the stereotype.
    1. Average students, parents didn't force us to be straight A students, just wanted us to do our best.
    2. None of us play the piano or chess
    3. Sad fact, we only speak english, our parents don't know Japanese, and our grandparents never use it/forgot it.
    4. I have never gotten in a driving accident, just a speeding ticket.

    I think that there are people out there who break the asian stereotype out of rebellion. I have known asians with strict parents who end up rebelling against them and becoming what some would consider wild. This would probably have to do with the pressure to be like everyone else. Every kid wants to fit in, no matter what ethnicity.

    One thing to look at is the racism/stereotyping that goes on within the asian community to each other.

    I work with international kids, and one thing that I noticed is that the kids from spain respected everyone, but the respect was not mutual. I noticed that a few asian kids did not want to room with another type of asian race. ex. A korean student did not want a taiwanese room mate. Another one was that a taiwanese student talked dirt about the spanish students all the time.

    This racism/stereotyping also happens among asians living in america.
    1. My grandma doesn't particularly like koreans, but she loves korean drama on tv
    2. I've heard jokes about the Chinese being cheap
    3. People say Koreans are cocky
    4. I will hear family talk about men who act old fashion Japanese, therefore being stubborn and king of the house

    As far as relationships, when talking to guys I have gotten a lot of "I am not into asians" Sure I am mostly attracted to non-asians, but that does not cut them out completely for me.

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    Aug 03, 2010 7:23 AM GMT
    Here is my own "answer" to question #1: What are the Asian stereotypes, and how have they changed in the last decade?

    The stereotypes that I have discovered that some people have about “Asians” (specifically Chinese) include: smart; industrious; chintzy; awkward; mean; emotionless; “humble” (ala being silent, and tolerant of abuse and insult); the “coolee hat”; eating rice; lives at home with multiple generations of family and without privacy; has a pushy mother who wants the son to marry and have children; is geeky; when upset, reverts to native language, and talks fast and loud; is not handsome or beautiful according to Western standards; has buck teeth; must know “karate”; has a rickshaw; eats “chop suey”; eats with “chop sticks”; decorates house with red lanterns, yin & yang symbols, and statues of buddah; eats dogs and cats; if they’re in business it must be a restaurant or a laundry (and by the way, “No tickie, no laundry”); we all look the same.

    My perspective is that Asians of all nationalities and ethnicities are gaining greater acceptance in all aspects of society in the United States. My perspective is limited to the United States because I have not lived abroad.

    I do sense that there is both more openness and wariness of the People’s Republic of China as that nation continues to develop. Perhaps I am more sensitive to how this one particular nation is viewed due to my Chinese heritage.

    I also sense that (generally) Americans are making a greater effort to be more culturally aware of our global community member nation states, as well as those ethnicities that do not have a homeland.

    What are your thoughts?

    Aloha and Be Well!
    Alan
  • beaujangle

    Posts: 1701

    Aug 03, 2010 7:44 AM GMT
    This docu is really good; looking from the perspective of Asians in Australia





  • metta

    Posts: 39165

    Aug 03, 2010 7:45 AM GMT
    I'm half asian. And I'm going to be naughty here. A stereotype has never meant that every person that is in that group follows this. It just means that there is a common trend that can often times be seen.

    This is terrible to say but when driving in predominantly Asian areas, you have to drive more carefully because first generation Asians do tend to drive differently. Many seem to get scared easily and driving in LA, that is not a good thing. They tend to get in more accidents even though they tend to drive really slow. Just ask the insurance agents in these areas. And they tend to drive more luxury cars than average. Old asian women in a big Mercedes tend to be the most dangerous.... ;)

    Education is a priority in most asian families. One of my neighbor/friends works in the San Marino school district, which is continuously rated as the best school district in the State of California. Because they are rated so highly and they have an excellent ESL program, they have a large asian population. Some of the students have parents that actually pay cash for multi-million dollar homes, hire a maid and buy the kid a luxury car so that they can go to this school district while the parents stay in their home country. My friend likes to joke that all Asians have money. Parents tend to put a lot of pressure on their children to do well. It is not something that people like to talk about, but it is not uncommon for children to commit suicide under the immense pressure to succeed.

    Find a predominantly Asian school district and most likely you will find it to be a good school district.

    Thankfully, my parents only asked that I do my best. They did not expect me to follow the line of doctors. In fact, my father used to tell me that being a doctor has changed so much. He believed that he should always dedicate a minimum of half an hour with each patient. With the way insurance works today, that makes it very difficult. Being a doctor did not used to mean buying several multi-million dollar homes and living in excess. The priority used to be doing what was best for the patient. And I find it weird that my half-brother puts that kind of pressure on his own children. After recently visiting my family in Hawaii I think I understand better why my Dad decided to stay in California. They are wonderful people but the family does put a lot of unnecessary pressure. When I visited them, I was pretty clear that I did not live that way. I put enough pressure on myself to meet my own goals. I did not need them to put pressure on what they thought my goals should be.

    In regards to manners, some are extremely well manured and there are some that have disgusting habits, such as spitting and I have heard of disgusting ways to blow their nose.