Protein Digestion

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 16, 2008 4:36 AM GMT
    I recently started a new diet plan that includes 180 grams of protein daily. I have managed to fit this much into my daily diet, but I think that my body is having a hard time digesting all of it... my stomach has been working overtime doing something!

    Has anyone had this problem or know a solution?

    THANKS in advance!
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    Feb 16, 2008 3:28 PM GMT
    From my empirical experience (so take it or leave it) and from what I've read on the internets, I think human bodies have a hard time digesting large amounts of protein at once. You'll be better by spreading your protein intake throughout the day as much as possible.
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    Feb 22, 2008 3:49 AM GMT
    It also depends on the type of protein as well. Whey protein concentrate isn't handled by the GI particularly well and can make you gassy. Fun. If you take a protein supplement and it is all concentrate then you could have trouble. But if it is blended with isolate you could be alright.

    If you spread your protein out as javaman suggested, take quality protein supplements, and still have a problem you might consider taking a digestive enzyme supplement.
  • fryblock

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    Feb 22, 2008 3:57 AM GMT
    holy crap thats like 4 times the amount that humans need. excessive protein isn't easily absorb, isn't stored well, and can even leach calcium from your body as it's excreted in urine. i'd be careful.
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    Feb 22, 2008 4:23 AM GMT
    A high protein diet is an EXCELLENT way to build lean muscle mass. Your body uses more calories to digest protein than carbohyrdates or fat. About 25 calories per 100 cals consumed vs. 10 calories per 100 consumed. So a high-protein diet will keep your body burning more fat. Just make sure its lean, high-quality protein...whey, fish, turkey, chicken, dairy (especially yougurt) or lean cuts of beef.

    The best way to consume protein is about 30-40 grams per serving. Is there a type of protein that gives you GI trouble? I have a very sensitive stomach, and I find that upping my fiber intake when I up my protein intake (200 or more grams a day) really helps with digestion. Some oatmeal in the morning, flaxseed with yogurt, and some beans will get a good amount of fiber in you. That might help.
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    Feb 22, 2008 5:31 AM GMT
    fryblock saidholy crap thats like 4 times the amount that humans need. excessive protein isn't easily absorb, isn't stored well, and can even leach calcium from your body as it's excreted in urine. i'd be careful.


    What the human body needs vs what is needed to build muscle are two separate requirements. An average, sedentary American doesn't need his or her body weight in protein, but enough to prevent muscle atrophy..."break even". Most of us here work out, so we push the body's protein requirements (and other macronutrients). When you cause muscle trauma in the gym, your body needs protein to rebuild it. The higher your intake of protein, the more your body will be able to repair and grow muscle tissue. Assuming epedx is lifting and causing muscle trauma on a regular basis, 180 grams of protein is good for muscle hypertrophy. The body won't need to absorb protein, since it is used for tissue repair.
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    Feb 22, 2008 7:53 PM GMT
    I agree with LMSF. I do weight training 3x per week, and if I eat as little as 60-80 grams of protein a day, my energy level crashes as if I have anemia.
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    Feb 22, 2008 9:44 PM GMT
    if that protein source is milk or weigh based then get some lactase from a pharmacist. It helps the body process lactose and can alleviate the symptoms.

    As for protein requirement even if you were to take on the moderate to high reccomendation of 1.5g per kg you would be weighing in at 120kg or 264lbs to need that level of intake.

    Here's a good review of protein requirements and teh avrious factors that impact on preotein synthesis for all that like studies to back things up, altho its not very conclusive http://www.jissn.com/content/3/1/7#IDANMHS


    and for thos ewho have access this is probably one of the main articles that is referred to as a baseline:

    [url]http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3356636?dopt=Abstract&holding=f1000,f1000m,isrctn[/url]
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    Feb 24, 2008 7:49 PM GMT
    Thanks for all the help guys, after reading around from you post I have spaced my protein intake out a little more , 2 smaller protein shakes rather than one larger sized one. Which seems to do the trick. I used to cap of my even workout with a protein shake that had almost 50 grams of protein in it... (NOT THE BEST IDEA icon_smile.gif )

    Amount of protein it is right on par... even though it seems like enough I am 6'5" tall and my lean mass weighs in at 200 lbs. (270 overall...) So 180 grams is right where I should be. And as a reference point for Fryblock, to maintain weight as a person of my stature I need to eat almost 4300 calories daily to keep my body functioning at full force.

    The fiber has also been very helpful, adding a little to the protein shakes really eases the GI tract.