Diabetes.... Who's at risk? And how do you know you have it?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 08, 2010 12:50 AM GMT
    Diabetes....

    Do to how many people are in shape on this site...I very rarely, if ever hear diabetes spoken about on here....

    But I here it spoken of all the time in the 'hetro' orientated sites.

    Seems like everytime I turn around...some middle aged guy is getting, or already has diabetes...so I would like to do a little research on my own and see what it is...

    I mean I know what it is...but I've always been curious how one recognizes when they get it?

    Here are some things I found out real quick..

    1. Diabetes is a metabolism disorder

    Most of what we eat is broken down into glucose, which is a form of sugar in the blood and a principle sorce of fuel for the body.

    blood-glucose1.jpg

    Glucose cannont enter the cells without insulin, which is a hormone produced by the pancreus
    8883.jpg

    Also, I don't know how accurate these figures are but..

    Aprox 17.9 m have diabetes
    Aprox 5.7 m are undiagnosed...
    Aprox 57 million people have 'pre-diabetes'....

    And I guess that last one is what has got me curious....cause it seems most never know they have it until they go to the doctor and the doctor tells them...now suddenly they can't live or get by without insulin injections...

    Well, what would of happened had they never gone to the doctor?

    And that's why in the next post...I want to write more about diabetic symptoms...learning to recognize when or if one has it...

    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/info/diabetes/


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    Aug 08, 2010 1:19 AM GMT
    Some possible diabetic symptoms...

    1.Going to the bathroom often...

    toilet.jpg

    If insulin is not effective in yur blood, meaning to much or to little, the kidneys cannot filter glucose back into blood,So the kindneys take water from the blood in order to dilute glucose, in which turn fills up the bladder...

    image9.png

    2. High thrist (as result of 1.)

    3. Weight gain...(again, you will eat more to compensate for low or no glucose)

    4. Mass weight loss...you body will need to find another sorce of energy...and will start using other tissue in your body...

    5. Increased fatigue...because the glucose is not being processed properly...you will not get the energy you need...and so will feel tired and listless all or most of the time...without any real cause or exertion of energy..

    6. Blurred vision...

    Blur+vision.jpg

    Again...due to lack of glucose in the blood (energy sorce) your body will begin to tear away at the lense in your eyes...almost like 'eating yourself'...in order to keep energy levels up...

    7. Injuries not healing up in a timely manner or not at all..

    8. Itchy skin...can sometimes be a symptom...

    9. Unusually red or swollen gums...loose teeth...

    10. With males over 50, sexual dysfunction can sometimes be a symptom...

    11. Tingling or numbing sensation in hands or feet...

    Anyhow...the above are some possible symptoms of pre diabetes...one or two alone...maybe not...but if 3 or more persist...than having a urine test could determine if it is or isn't diabetes...
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    Aug 08, 2010 1:53 AM GMT
    Diabetes...

    A few more things I learned....

    1. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness amongst 20-74 year olds...

    2. 60% of limb amputations are from the diabetic community...

    3. Fat free foods, actually make your insulin levels very unstable...not recomended at all...
    http://chinese-school.netfirms.com/diabetes-prevention.html

    4. Fill a one gallon jug with water, twice a day, and drink all of it...icon_eek.gif

    355.jpg

    hmm...I don't know if that's opinion or medical fact...I left an above link to the site that mentioned that...boy...that's a lot of water...

    But now that I think of it...most of us probablly drink that much liquid drinks in the course of a day anyhow...only not water...but soda, coffee, milk, energy drinks ect ect...

    softdrinks.jpg

    Actually I gave up the consumption of mass soft drinks quite a few months ago...and not only that...I heard sodas are responsible for or help contribute to osteoporosis..

    osteo.jpg

    I guess the citric acid and or other chemicals in soda, eat away at your bones and joinst, makeing them soft...brittle and vunerble to fractures or dislocations...

    Anyhow...enough on that for now...
    Feel free to do more research on your own...many people start getting diabetes in their late 20's 30's and 40's....

    Just writing about all this makes me want to go excercise right now...later...

    019%20Beaded%20Jump%20Rope-2T.jpg...ahh yes, I remember these plastic ladened jump ropes from school...school districts use to love to order this kind...

    Their pretty good actually though...
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    Aug 12, 2010 3:25 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidPeople with advanced diabetes can go blind or lose limbs because the sugars floating in their body have no way of being digested and assimilated. So the sugars basically eat away at tissues such as appendages (legs) and the lenses of the eyes. This is why some people become visually impaired or lose their eyesight. But this is rare since people usually experience other symptoms and are diagnosed and if they are willing - they make changes to halt the degenerative effects of diabetes. Most people who reach this stage already know that they have diabetes but refuse to take good care of themselves and sadly continue to eat poorly.

    The phosphorus in soda followed by a diet low in calcium (let's face it - most people who are addicted to sodas are not all that concerned about their calcium intake) creates an environment in the body where phosphates in the blood are high which will pull calcium from the bones. This leads to the weakening of bones which can lead to osteoporotic conditions. The citric acid is not a problem in this case.

    Thanks for you post, Starlite. It was informative. My father had advanced diabetes along with Muscular Dystrophy. Two dreadful conditions eating away at his muscles! He did not follow his diet and was often found to be snacking on something sugary sweet. He passed away at 54, such a young age.


    yep....diabetic polyneuropathy (PNS), diabetic retinopathy (retinas), nephropathy (kidneys).
    diabetic-peripheral-neuropathy-294x300.j

    check it out...this happened to a patient who developed diabetic polyneuropathy. This patient eventually lost sensation in his/her limbs and probably stepped on things that caused an initial scar. Since he/she could not feel it, it went unoticed and developed into a much more significant problem.

    Retinopathy can occur in essentially every patient who develops full blown Diabetes (Type I or Type II) Mellitus. It is thought that it takes around 10 years from the time of diagnosis to the time of retinopathy progression..

    Word of caution about Type I: YOU CAN LIVE A HEALTHY LIFESTYLE and still develop this. 2 Factors determine its development: 1. Genetic Predisposition (develop an autoimmune reaction), 2. Infection

    Jay Cutler (former Broncos QB...now Bears QB) did not realize he had Type I DM until 2008.

    If Type 1 runs in your family be sure to keep in contact with your doc.

    cya!
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Aug 12, 2010 3:32 AM GMT
    Thanks Starlight. Diabetes is certainly widespread, travels in families and can be horrible and fatal. Some people have it and dont' even realize.
    I wrote a client a nice life insurance policy a couple of years ago... about 30 years old, no adverse health history... then REJECTION! Come to find out he had diabetes (now under control).. and he is insured now.. but it could have been much worse. Glad he applied for the insurance.

    My father's family has a history of diabetes, mainly on the female side.. but my Dad was diagnosed as a borderline diabetic about 10 years ago. I always am being checked... but nothing at all.

    Have you been checked?

    icon_neutral.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 12, 2010 3:45 AM GMT
    HndsmKansan saidThanks Starlight. Diabetes is certainly widespread, travels in families and can be horrible and fatal. Some people have it and dont' even realize.
    I wrote a client a nice life insurance policy a couple of years ago... about 30 years old, no adverse health history... then REJECTION! Come to find out he had diabetes (now under control).. and he is insured now.. but it could have been much worse. Glad he applied for the insurance.

    My father's family has a history of diabetes, mainly on the female side.. but my Dad was diagnosed as a borderline diabetic about 10 years ago. I always am being checked... but nothing at all.

    Have you been checked?

    icon_neutral.gif


    Your father is borderline for Type II?
    If so, you staying healthy will keep you from developing it.

    best of luck
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    Aug 12, 2010 3:52 AM GMT
    Type 1 diabetes is an auto-immune disease.

    Type 2 diabetes is a disease of obesity and is generally very preventable.

    Both are suspected to be related to high intake of refined sugar, but, with two different body responses. Discovery Magazine has published some works on some of the bleeding edge research on diabetes.

    Type 2 diabetes is PREVENTABLE with as little as TWO intense exercise sessions per week.

    By 2020, the CDC, and USDA, say that fully 1/3 of ALL U.S. citizens will be type 2 diabetes.

    We face a health care pandemic due to obesity and obesity related disease.

    Folks have to begin to take responsibility for their personal health. If you don't believe me, visit your local Wally World Mega Mart.
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    Aug 12, 2010 4:04 AM GMT
    All of you amaze me...

    Why?
    Cause of your collective knowledge on this stuff...

    It's like you know more than doctors tell you when you go visit...

    Doctors never tell you this stuff...they just seem to stick stuff down your throat and in your ears...lay you down on the table and tickle you...and then say

    'Put your close back on, you can leave now' icon_eek.gif

    exam%20table%20umf.jpg

    I quietly learn from you guys, what to do, and what not to do...when it comes to health...

    Diabetes just seems to be something that so many males from 25-55 seem to be getting lately...and it seems so preventable...

    I appreciate you guys, and what you know, and all the 'invisible' readers who learn from it, appreciate it also...
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    Aug 12, 2010 4:04 AM GMT
    I shouldnt have read this.
    My hypochondriac tendencies are kicking in. ugh.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 12, 2010 4:08 AM GMT
    chuckystud saidType 1 diabetes is an auto-immune disease.

    Type 2 diabetes is a disease of obesity and is generally very preventable.

    Both are suspected to be related to high intake of refined sugar, but, with two different body responses. Discovery Magazine has published some works on some of the bleeding edge research on diabetes.

    Type 2 diabetes is PREVENTABLE with as little as TWO intense exercise sessions per week.

    By 2020, the CDC, and USDA, say that fully 1/3 of ALL U.S. citizens will be type 2 diabetes.

    We face a health care pandemic due to obesity and obesity related disease.

    Folks have to begin to take responsibility for their personal health. If you don't believe me, visit your local Wally World Mega Mart.


    Actually type II DM is related to high sugar intake...but not type I. It is thought that it is an autoimmune disease that manifests after a bout with the "right type" of infection to cause the self-destruction of beta cells in your pancreas by one's T-cells.

    Yep...exercise definitely helps prevent DM II. It also helps progession towards DM II. So, for instance if what Hndsmkansan's father developed was impaired glucose tolerance (borderline diabetes...i.e. takes more and more insulin to clear the same amt of glucose from his body) and began an regimented exercise program, like Chucky mentioned, then his IGT could definitely dissipate (of course an improved diet would have to accompany the increase in physical exertion). Our muscles have the ability to take up glucose without any stimulation from insulin...kinda cool!icon_biggrin.gif

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    Aug 12, 2010 4:13 AM GMT
    This is my 25th year as a type 1 diabetic. Sudden weight loss, frequent urination, and fatigue were the symptoms that told me I had developed the disorder. My blood sugars were very high then, but not to the extent of some of the horror stories you hear of 1000 or 1200. This is because a few years before my brother had developed the disease and so I recognized the symptoms earlier than some. My grandmother was also a type 1 diabetic since long before I was born and died a couple years ago- at the age of 90. Being a diabetic for so long, I have seen the changes that have made it a much easier disease to live with. At one time it was attempting to have your meals on the same set schedule everyday, taking the same amount of insulin before every meal, and trying to have the same portion sizes at every meal. Taking newer insulins in conjunction with each other such as Lantus or Humulog or an insulin pump now allows more freedom with when you want to eat and how much you want to eat. These better medicines and being able to live more like other people (eating when you are hungry or when your schedule permits) can bring better success in controlling blood sugar than in the past.

    One major issue that still exists and has gotten worse for diabetics is the financial cost of this disease. It is an extremely expensive disease. Insulin, syringes or insulin pens or pumps and catheters, blood testing kits and test strips quickly add up. In these times it has forced some people to revert back to the less expensive insulins like NPH. While an artificial pancreas transplant is a hope for the future, it is still a long ways off. One of the things that could be done now to greatly benefit diabetics would be allowing companies to market generic forms of insulin. The FDA has still not approved any generic insulin. The cost of the disease is often the biggest stress factor for a diabetic. Even with insurance, I still pay a lot of money out of pocket.
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    Aug 12, 2010 6:28 PM GMT
    orthojock said
    chuckystud saidType 1 diabetes is an auto-immune disease.

    Type 2 diabetes is a disease of obesity and is generally very preventable.

    Both are suspected to be related to high intake of refined sugar, but, with two different body responses. Discovery Magazine has published some works on some of the bleeding edge research on diabetes.

    Type 2 diabetes is PREVENTABLE with as little as TWO intense exercise sessions per week.

    By 2020, the CDC, and USDA, say that fully 1/3 of ALL U.S. citizens will be type 2 diabetes.

    We face a health care pandemic due to obesity and obesity related disease.

    Folks have to begin to take responsibility for their personal health. If you don't believe me, visit your local Wally World Mega Mart.


    Actually type II DM is related to high sugar intake...but not type I. It is thought that it is an autoimmune disease that manifests after a bout with the "right type" of infection to cause the self-destruction of beta cells in your pancreas by one's T-cells.

    Yep...exercise definitely helps prevent DM II. It also helps progession towards DM II. So, for instance if what Hndsmkansan's father developed was impaired glucose tolerance (borderline diabetes...i.e. takes more and more insulin to clear the same amt of glucose from his body) and began an regimented exercise program, like Chucky mentioned, then his IGT could definitely dissipate (of course an improved diet would have to accompany the increase in physical exertion). Our muscles have the ability to take up glucose without any stimulation from insulin...kinda cool!icon_biggrin.gif



    I'm afraid you're not up to speed on the very latest research.

    The latest research shows that type 1 is likely triggered by a poor childhood diet, and either the immune system responds (you get type Type 1), or it doesn't (you go on to get Type 2).

    You'll want to avail yourself of the latest research on the topic.

    The latest research shows a STRONG correlation to diet and exercise with both Type 1, and Type 2.

    You'll want to read the stuff I referred you to.

    It's been known for quite a while now that Type 2 in nearly 100% preventable.

    And, yes, diabetes, is very expensive. In the U.S. sick folks are exploited.

    Humalog insulin in Canada (over the counter): $48.25. Humalog insulin in the U.S. (prescription required): $109.55. Here in the U.S., the GOP and drugs companies have bent over those who have disease, raping and pillaging their last dollars. Now, they've made it ILLEGAL to import that cheaper version of the SAME EXACT COMPOUND from Canada. (That's the GOP and big Pharm money hard at work.) That should be criminal but folks believe the FUD coming from the GOP, and Big Pharm. It's wrong, and, it really should be criminal. It's breaking the backs of sick folks, and it's killing our small businesses and our economy.
  • LJay

    Posts: 11612

    Aug 15, 2010 1:17 AM GMT

    Diabetes is a really tricky disease, but you certainly have the basics down. Don't forget that constant hunger is one of them. If you think you have symptoms, go to the doctor or have it checked when you are there for something else. In the meantime eat simply, hydrate thoroughly, keep up the fiber, avoid refined sugar when you can and exercise. Nothing wrong with doing that stuff anyway.

    It is good to remember that your doctor is working for YOU. If you want to know things, ask questions. Not a bad idea to write them down ahead of time. You have the right to know.
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    Aug 15, 2010 4:22 PM GMT
    I don't know the facts about Diabetes but, I do know a lot of people that are diabetic and in advanced stages they also seem to present the disease called Gout where their foot usually swells up. The diet that both diseases require is also very similar. No red meat, low colesterol (sp?), no sodas. I'm not sure really what Gout is but the pain is apparently so excrutiating it will make a grown man cry.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Aug 16, 2010 8:01 AM GMT
    chuckystud said
    orthojock said
    chuckystud saidType 1 diabetes is an auto-immune disease.

    Type 2 diabetes is a disease of obesity and is generally very preventable.

    Both are suspected to be related to high intake of refined sugar, but, with two different body responses. Discovery Magazine has published some works on some of the bleeding edge research on diabetes.

    Type 2 diabetes is PREVENTABLE with as little as TWO intense exercise sessions per week.

    By 2020, the CDC, and USDA, say that fully 1/3 of ALL U.S. citizens will be type 2 diabetes.

    We face a health care pandemic due to obesity and obesity related disease.

    Folks have to begin to take responsibility for their personal health. If you don't believe me, visit your local Wally World Mega Mart.


    Actually type II DM is related to high sugar intake...but not type I. It is thought that it is an autoimmune disease that manifests after a bout with the "right type" of infection to cause the self-destruction of beta cells in your pancreas by one's T-cells.

    Yep...exercise definitely helps prevent DM II. It also helps progession towards DM II. So, for instance if what Hndsmkansan's father developed was impaired glucose tolerance (borderline diabetes...i.e. takes more and more insulin to clear the same amt of glucose from his body) and began an regimented exercise program, like Chucky mentioned, then his IGT could definitely dissipate (of course an improved diet would have to accompany the increase in physical exertion). Our muscles have the ability to take up glucose without any stimulation from insulin...kinda cool!icon_biggrin.gif



    I'm afraid you're not up to speed on the very latest research.

    The latest research shows that type 1 is likely triggered by a poor childhood diet, and either the immune system responds (you get type Type 1), or it doesn't (you go on to get Type 2).

    You'll want to avail yourself of the latest research on the topic.

    The latest research shows a STRONG correlation to diet and exercise with both Type 1, and Type 2.

    You'll want to read the stuff I referred you to.

    It's been known for quite a while now that Type 2 in nearly 100% preventable.

    And, yes, diabetes, is very expensive. In the U.S. sick folks are exploited.

    Humalog insulin in Canada (over the counter): $48.25. Humalog insulin in the U.S. (prescription required): $109.55. Here in the U.S., the GOP and drugs companies have bent over those who have disease, raping and pillaging their last dollars. Now, they've made it ILLEGAL to import that cheaper version of the SAME EXACT COMPOUND from Canada. (That's the GOP and big Pharm money hard at work.) That should be criminal but folks believe the FUD coming from the GOP, and Big Pharm. It's wrong, and, it really should be criminal. It's breaking the backs of sick folks, and it's killing our small businesses and our economy.


    because his roomate flex has diabetes and they shoot roids he feels he is an authority on bothicon_lol.gif
    If you have symptoms see a real Dr. not a real jock or in his case a fat roid gut one.
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    Aug 16, 2010 9:11 AM GMT
    Diabetes runs rampant on boths sides of my family, mostly type one on my dad's and mixed one and two on my mom's. When I was 9 I got checked for juvenile diabetes since my cousin Annie was diagnosed as insulin dependant and she was just a year older than me. Anyway the doctor told me I was prediabetic, I have never even been chubby nor have I ever been a fan of sweets. It is just the way my body works, thus I have been on a diet since pre-puberty :/

    Diabetes is serious for anyone gay or straight, male or female. Which is why it is important to have regular doctor visits. icon_smile.gif

    Not sure if this helps or if it even adds anything significan to the thread, but I gave it a shot.
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    Sep 01, 2010 8:27 PM GMT
    Hi guys,

    I just wanted to touch on some things clinically about diabetes as there seems to be adequate info posted from the literature. When you go in for your annual, yes you should get checked out annually at any age, make sure your primary care physician takes a blood test. It should cover your liver function, thyroid function, kidney, and blood sugar. They will measure your blood glucose within this test and if suspicious they'll conduct further tests. One being your A1C level, if they don't and you're feeling suspicious ask that they conduct this test. It takes a simple prick on the finger and gives an average of your blood sugar over the past 3 months. Usually the general symptoms of diabetes are polydipsia, polyphagia and polyuria meaning increased eating, increased peeing, and increased thirst. You will experience these symptoms first and they will prompt you to go see somebody. However if you have these symptoms it by no means indicates that you have diabetes, the gold standard is simple blood sugar tests. I'm sure this has been posted already but type I diabetes tends to have more of a genetic correlation (i.e. it tends to skip generations) if you have grandparents that have type I, get checked. Type II is greatly correlated with diet and tends to occur much later in life. Type II is brought on by peripheral cells not reacting adequately to your insulin and it's shown that eating a healthy diet prevents this from occurring.

    In sum, get an annual physical including a blood test...yes even in your 20's, eat correctly and exercise throughout your life, and listen to your body, if you feel something is off go see your primary care physician. Hope this helps.
  • ZacktheMan

    Posts: 340

    Sep 02, 2010 12:24 AM GMT
    Many praises and thanks to Starlite for starting this thread, it is an important subject

    Type 1 diabetes is a chronic (lifelong) disease that occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin to properly control blood sugar levels.

    Type 1 requires insulin shots for life. If glucose (sugar) is high in a Type 1 Diabetic, he shoots insulin into his bloodstream,

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic (lifelong) disease marked by high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. In Type 2 Diabetes, the body's cells become resistive to the insulin being produced by the Pancreas. Reversing insulin resistance by re-sensitizing cells to insulin is the key to preventing diabetes. The right foods and nutritional supplements, as well as exercise, help to restore the communication between insulin and the body's cells.

    Here are some of the drugs used to control Type 2 Diabetes.

    Some of the most common types of medication are listed below. They are taken by mouth or injection.

    * Biguanides (Metformin) tell the liver to produce less glucose and help muscle and fat cells and the liver absorb more glucose from the bloodstream. This lowers blood sugar levels.
    * Sulfonylureas (like glimepiride, glyburide, and tolazamide) trigger the pancreas to make more insulin. They are taken by mouth.
    * Thiazolidinediones (such as rosiglitazone) help muscle and fat cells and the liver absorb more blood sugar when insulin is present. Rosiglitazone may increase the risk of heart problems. Talk to your doctor.
    * Injectible medications (including exenatide and pramlintide) can lower blood sugar.
    * Meglitinides (including repaglinide and nateglinide) trigger the pancreas to make more insulin in response to the level of glucose in the blood.
    * Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (such as acarbose) decrease the absorption of carbohydrates from the digestive tract to lower after-meal glucose levels.

    Insulin is only prescribed for type 2 Diabetes if the drugs fail to bring our Glucose to their proper levels.

    My doctor subscribed Metformin and glyburide for me. I highlighted them in the chart above to show what they do for me.

    My experience with my Type 2 Diabetes.

    I discovered I had Type 2 Diabetes 10 years ago. It happened one year after I stopped playing Softball and Winter league Bowling. I had diabetes and did not know it. Less exercise and weight gain led to my Diabetes type 2. One symptom of my Diabetes type 2 was an increase in appetite. I went from 250 lbs to 300 lbs over the next year. At this point, I became constantly thirsty, but soda and sweet drinks I normally drink I could not drink, I bought a couple of these type drinks and threw them away after one sip. My body actually craved for water only, the colder, the better.

    Besides the constant thirst, I was also urinating a lot. These are two more symptoms that one may have from Diabetes Type 2. When I told my niece, a Registered Nurse, she gave me a glucose test and my sugars were well over 400 mg/dl. This was the 1st time I knew I had diabetes, 2 years after I actually had diabetes.

    My sister took me to an excellent Doctor, MD of Diabetes, Metabolism, and Endocrinology. He talked to me about it in great detail, and had me watch a movie all about diabetes and its' treatments, exercise and diet. I was given the medicines and meter to track and regulate my glucose levels. About a year later my weight was down to 218 LBS, and I no longer needed any medicines, my body was once again properly regulating my sugar levels.

    I thought I was cured and slowly drifted back to my old habits of a sweet tooth, eating too much, and not exercising enough. My weight went up to 245 LBS and I was back on glyburide and Metformin. So I decided to make permanent lifestyle changes in my diet and exercise routines. Now I am down to 200 LBS and this significantly reduced the amount of glyburide and Metformin I need to take. I'm hoping to lose enough weight to fit in those $ 500 suits I bought at Wallach's 28 years ago.

    I cut out a lot of carbohydrates from my diet. A bagel is worse for a Diabetic than a Dunkin' Donut, because carbohydrates are turned into glucose by our body. Now I choose much healthier foods to eat, and mostly drink low or no sugar drinks, and never eat or drink anything with High Fructose Corn Syrup in it, but I will have wine with some meals, and an occasional beer.