Track and Field Workout and Diet?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 12, 2010 12:35 AM GMT
    Hey there! I'm doing track for the first time. My coach gave me a summer workout routine but I don't understand what some of the moves are. I'm suppose to be focusing on cardio, strength training, and core workouts. What is an ideal time one should focus on a track workout per day? Should I be doing more of one thing then the other or divide the time equally? Also, I heard a good track diet consists of loading on carbs but only before a competition or workout. I'm also ADDICTED to coffee ( I have it once or twice a day). Should I reduce my caffeine intake if Im doing track?

    Thanks and bare in mind I am a beginner.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 12, 2010 12:57 AM GMT
    It really depends on what you are going to run/planning on running. I have done track collegiately for the past few years and have been pretty successful at it. If you would go into detail on what you are going to run/ jump then i'll be able to give you some info. You can also shoot me a message and i'll see what your coach laid out for you.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 12, 2010 1:23 AM GMT
    I'm sprinting.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 12, 2010 1:38 AM GMT
    If i were u i would start with training using explosive movement, like jump squats with calve raise to end it, box jumps, strength shoes help too with explosive workout, doing 10-40 yard dashes, the progress with it, Your diet would probably be highly based on protein, and low carb with healthy fats like flax seed, olive oil, diet would eggs, oatmeal, lean steak once or twice a week, chicken 3 times a week, tuna 2times a week....Also stretch to maintain flexibility, if u need more info am sure some of the guys on here can add more to this or u can always google it... Good luck man!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 12, 2010 1:39 AM GMT
    Carb diet is for long distance runner, sprinter definitly don't need it.
    You need a normal balanced diet.

    I think your coach gave you routine to build up your core during holydays, before to start the real work.
    Everyday is too much, train 4 to 5 time a week.

    Do your cardio on a very low rythme, and not too much. Ideally, 20 minutes before each workout, and that's it. you need the cardio to strenghten your heart, but too much cardio will reduce your sprint abilities.

    Coffe two or tree times a day won't hurt you at all, just avoid coffe in late evening, as it will make you go to bed later, and you will need to sleep a lot to benefit from your training.

    Best time for training is around 4/5pm, is you wake up around 8am.

    If you feel 5 time a week is not enough, there is one, and only one thing that you can do as much as you want : abs and stretching. you will need huge amount of them to handle speed run training without injuries.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 12, 2010 1:43 AM GMT
    Agamemnon saidIf i were u i would start with training using explosive movement, like jump squats with calve raise to end it, box jumps, strength shoes help too with explosive workout, doing 10-40 yard dashes, the progress with it, Your diet would probably be highly based on protein, and low carb with healthy fats like flax seed, olive oil, diet would eggs, oatmeal, lean steak once or twice a week, chicken 3 times a week, tuna 2times a week....Also stretch to maintain flexibility, if u need more info am sure some of the guys on here can add more to this or u can always google it... Good luck man!


    I think he should avoid protein rich diet. There is no need for it in his case, and there is risk of cramps and tendinitis. No high carb, no high protein, no high fat ;-) just the regular healthy balanced diet, with may be more fruit and veggies.
  • allamathlete

    Posts: 81

    Aug 12, 2010 2:16 AM GMT
    Welcome to the T&F family! I was a sprinter/jumper from the time i was 7 all the way up through college, then did some post collegiately until I was about 26 and have been coaching college track (sprints/jumps/mulits/hurdles) since about 99. Ive coached HS, JUCO, DIII, & DI and have been pretty successful at it with All Americans at every level. as far as the moves i would assume you are talking drills or some sort of mobility warmup. its hard to say without seeing the workouts, so if you can show me i can be of more help. I would say since you are new to the sport it may be a good idea to start doing your workouts around the time you will have practices with the team. that way you can condition your body to do large loads of similar work around the same time... it helps with efficiency during workouts and, especially with sprinting, makes the nervous system more prepared. as far as the amount of time most track workouts will take around 1.5 to 2 hrs from warm up to cool down and stretching. as far as doing more of one thing than another, if your coach is any good they will have laid out how much of each area you should be doing (unless they have strict conference guidelines on what they can/cant do out of season) but i would say since you are starting new your focus should be 1. conditioning (cardio), 2. strength training 3. core. but again that depends on whats in the workouts.

    as far as the diet goes i tend to be in the minority here, but i don't do a lot with what you should and shouldn't eat. It worked for me, I was multiple times All American and won a National title... i tend to do more encouraging well rounded diet. the carbo loading is something i try to reserve more for pre-competition 24 hrs prior. with the short sprints and jumps you don't really need to carbo load but it doesn't hurt. let me know if you have more questions, i am always willing to help when it comes to promoting the sports i love.
    JW
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 12, 2010 3:10 AM GMT
    the "one one one"

    if you do it right it's wretched.

    1-1-1 & 1-1-2-1 & 1-2-2-1 & 1-2-1-1 & 1-1-1

    1 100m
    2 200m
    - 1:10 second break
    & 2:45 break


    or just do max'd 300's with a 6 minute break till you puke


    track workouts for sprinters arnt sposto be fun, you vomit, cramp and hate life


    just man up and do em right and fast
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 12, 2010 3:50 AM GMT
    I don't care if I puke or have a heart attack (I have heart problems) I don't know anything you just said.

    Like I said I am a beginner.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 12, 2010 4:22 PM GMT
    Well before you start doing the more difficult sprint drills/repeats or ladders you need to get your body in some kind of condition. Meaning a mix of long runs/ quick sprints. In other words repeat 90 second runs on certain days and quick 20sec x10rep 100yd runs while reducing it slowly, for now. It also doesn't hurt to o on a three mile run or so once a week.

    As far as lifting goes you want to focus on your pecs, triceps, and of course legs in general. So this would include deep squats, squat jumps, weighted lunges, calf presses, bench press, and tricep lift ups, i think thats what they're called. For explosiveness, which all sprinters need, you will need to do power cleans, and when doing squats come up as quick as possible rather than struggling with heavy weight, this goes for all lifting try and do it explosively that way you develop your fast twitch muscles. Frankly, by the time you're done with conditioning your coach is going to take over and give you the correct sprint exercises, however in order to get exact sprint drills you need to decide if your doing the 400 and 200, or 200 and 100. The intensity/lengths are completely different for the 400 and 100. Anyway, i'm sure this comes off extremely convoluted, but good luck in your track endeavors.