Muscle Fatigue

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    Feb 19, 2008 1:22 PM GMT
    I couldn't find the original thread on fatigue...

    Anyway,

    Do I NEED to feel fatigue (as in mucle aches) AFTER working out?

    For example, I may work out until my muscles are burning. But after a couple of hours, everything feels fine again. (Like this morning's set)

    However, I when I was starting out, I used to have muscle aches almost after every session. Just a week ago, for example, I started a set of all chest exercises. Two days afterwards, my pectorals were still sore. Should I aim for something like that? Especially with me still on the bulking up process?
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    Feb 19, 2008 5:50 PM GMT
    That is actually a good question...haven't seen it on the forums yet.
    The burning sensation in your muscles when working out is due to lactic acid build up. Its not entirely bad, however, it can cause you to have to stop your set before you have actually hit the muscle itself as hard as you can. Make sure you drink plenty of water throughout the day and while you are working out. Also stretch before and after exercise.
    It is important to understand how and why lactic acid accumulates in the muscles. When glucose is burned for fuel during exercise, it is broken down to a chemical called pyruvate. If you are working at a low enough intensity, sufficient oxygen will be available to easily convert pyruvate to carbon dioxide and water, which are removed by the lungs. When you are working at a very high intensity, however, there is not enough oxygen to convert all the pyruvate to carbon dioxide and water. The result is that some of the pyruvate is converted to lactic acid, which builds up in the muscles and overflows into the bloodstream. Lactic acid causes the "burning" sensation felt in muscles during high intensity exercise and also prevents muscles from working their best.
    The combination of good nutrition, hydration, and appropriate training practices will allow you to compete at a high intensity without allowing lactic acid to limit your performance.
    Also...it is okay to feel a little sore about 24 to 36 hours after working out. It usually does not begin to show up immediately after exercising. There is, however, a major difference between feeling a little sore and hurting to the point where you can hardly move (over training). I used to over train a lot and never understood why i never saw results. Feeling a little sore just indicates that you have broken your muscle down just enough to "shock" it into needing to repair itself just a little stronger than before to withstand the stress that you previously exposed it to. Over training breaks the muscle down so much that all of the energy that would be used to build the muscle is now being spent just repairing it back to the point that it was at before so you gain no ground.

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    Feb 19, 2008 8:47 PM GMT
    Derrick explains it beautifully - I'd only add one thing:

    Soreness that shows up some hours after a workout and decreases over time is probably just fine. Soreness that shows up some hours after a workout and continues to INCREASE for the next day or so indicates overtraining - it's called "DOMS" - "Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness".
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    Feb 19, 2008 9:48 PM GMT
    Yep, on both.

    DOMS, is generally micro-tears in the extreme. Some of that is good, I believe, in that it invokes an adaptive response, but, being so sore as to be dysfunctional is probably not always a good thing and I concur that it will ultimately lead to over-training.

    I rarely get either any more. Maybe, I'm just to old and decrepit, but, I'd venture a guess, that after 3.3 decades of lifting, my body is so highly adapted that the thresholds, and my ability to recover, are well beyond a regular person. I have to work very hard to get a burn anymore, and I rarely get DOMS like I did 2 decades ago. I suspect that I'm so vascular at this point, and that all the mechanisms have adapted to the point I can handle amazing load.

    I do stiff-legged, knees locked deadlifts at 315 for 8 reps, and people gawk at me, but, it's well within my ability. I don't take any strength "supplements" either.

    My trainers recently changed my routines all around, so, now, I'm almost circuit training. I approach a "burn" more now, but, still don't get them. My heart gets going with 8 sets of hack squats, and 45 second pauses. It's brutal. The concept is that the trainers want to keep me full and vascular, at aren't so concern about my ability to have brute strength as much as volumization and vascularization.

    Vascularization:

    9730_176046.jpg
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    Feb 20, 2008 11:52 AM GMT
    Derrick780Over training breaks the muscle down so much that all of the energy that would be used to build the muscle is now being spent just repairing it back to the point that it was at before so you gain no ground.


    PSBigJoeySoreness that shows up some hours after a workout and continues to INCREASE for the next day or so indicates overtraining - it's called "DOMS" - "Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness".


    chuckystud
    DOMS, is generally micro-tears in the extreme. Some of that is good, I believe, in that it invokes an adaptive response, but, being so sore as to be dysfunctional is probably not always a good thing and I concur that it will ultimately lead to over-training.


    Thanks a lot for the replies guys. Also to bfg1 who answered in private. I do know about lactic acid buildups, being a former Biology major. hehe Didn't know about it's impact on muscle growth though.

    BTW, chucky, is it overtraining or just the 'normal' muscle burn that causes vascularization?

    Take note, I'm not into bodybuilding. icon_razz.gif Just bulking up, and vascularization isn't really what I'm aiming for.