Excellent article for the fact-denying people (right and left)

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    Aug 16, 2010 12:26 AM GMT
    http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,2010175,00.html

    atunedin_0823.jpg

    Unfortunately it doesn't have the full article where it tells us why people hold onto their misbeliefs STRONGER after you show them the facts to the contrary. It's called "premature cognitive closure." Get a copy of TIME today.
  • commoncoll

    Posts: 1222

    Aug 16, 2010 12:53 AM GMT
    Is this the new advertisement campaign for Time?
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    Aug 16, 2010 12:57 AM GMT
    Not really, since I usually just leaf through it. But this guy's article was really worth the price of my subscription (a couple hundred frequent flyer miles).icon_lol.gif
  • calibro

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    Aug 16, 2010 1:25 AM GMT
    why don't you just sign up and post it for the rest of us?
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    Aug 16, 2010 1:34 AM GMT
    Um, there's the little thing called copyright...
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    Aug 16, 2010 1:36 AM GMT
    Or here's a thought: if it is based on research then perhaps you could locate the journal article?
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    Aug 16, 2010 1:58 AM GMT
    It's more opinion, but it does quote a book and some "studies." It's really applicable to this particular forum though.

    OK, I give up, here's a scan of the article:
    mythoffact.gif

  • commoncoll

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    Aug 16, 2010 2:01 AM GMT
    Thanks.
    I particularly like the last paragraph and the last paragraph in the middle column.
    I must admit that I had never heard of "premature cognitive closure" as a term before.
    It's all about affirmation like the paragraph around the picture says.
  • commoncoll

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    Aug 16, 2010 2:08 AM GMT
    Please describe the cartoon.
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    Aug 16, 2010 2:14 AM GMT
    It's the same one in the opening post, but if I were to describe it, he's trying to say that WMDs were "thought" into existence, Arabs might be denying that Arabs committed 911, and Obama is Islamic. I have no clue why FEMA and that woman were included, somebody enlighten me please.
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    Aug 16, 2010 2:16 AM GMT
    commoncoll said
    I must admit that I had never heard of "premature cognitive closure" as a term before.


    [url]http://books.google.com/books?id=WJQJYn-OuBUC&pg=PA187&lpg=PA187&dq=premature+cognitive+closure&source=bl&ots=U4BoAUaJS4&sig=e2-oZaJTcd3WuEdhoTQdlTGvsFo&hl=en&ei=Up9oTN_OHMT38AbZoJS6BA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=2&ved=0CBwQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=premature%20cognitive%20closure&f=false[/url]
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    Aug 16, 2010 3:09 AM GMT
    q1w2e3 saidIt's the same one in the opening post, but if I were to describe it, he's trying to say that WMDs were "thought" into existence, Arabs might be denying that Arabs committed 911, and Obama is Islamic. I have no clue why FEMA and that woman were included, somebody enlighten me please.


    The woman is Palin and she is basically saying 'shhhh' don't talk about 9-11 being an inside job though I see a christian cross with her finger and her teeth. The Fema sign is on a prison guard tower.
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    Aug 16, 2010 5:03 PM GMT
    How come this topic isn't getting more replies? This topic perfectly explains the issues with American culture and politics!

    Why wont more people take an interest in mental sciences icon_sad.gif
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    Aug 16, 2010 5:13 PM GMT
    DoomsDayAlpaca saidHow come this topic isn't getting more replies? This topic perfectly explains the issues with American culture and politics!

    Why wont more people take an interest in mental sciences icon_sad.gif

    Because it makes our heads hurt?

    But I laugh at fancy terms like "premature cognitive closure" that the experts love to invent, so they can publish a paper. In my day we would have referred to the folk observation that first impressions are often the strongest, and the hardest to change.
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    Aug 16, 2010 5:34 PM GMT
    PCC is easier to put in a paper than "pigheadness."

    Actually Malcolm Gladwell wrote a book about this phenomenon called Blink--that's a good term too.
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    Aug 16, 2010 5:36 PM GMT
    I'm neither "right" nor "left". Does this article only address those who see the world in black and white?
  • commoncoll

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    Aug 16, 2010 5:38 PM GMT
    q1w2e3 saidPCC is easier to put in a paper than "pigheadness."

    Actually Malcolm Gladwell wrote a book about this phenomenon called Blink--that's a good term too.

    Yes. That was an awesome book.
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    Aug 16, 2010 5:47 PM GMT
    "Rumors and conspiracy theories are oddly comforting. They simplify a complex world - one that experts consistently get wrong."

    q1w2e3...Pardon me, but by furthering the idea of "left or right" you've fallen into the same trap. It's an irresponsibly simplistic notion. And one that unfortunately is now pervasive in journalism and public discourse, thanks to the dumbed-down "you're with us or you're against us" culture of the Bush administration. It's also why in this day and age our culture cannot get it's head around Obama defending the right for American Muslims to build a Mosque in lower Manhattan yet reserve personal judgement on the matter.

    But it sure does make for lots of fighting and entertainment on the cable news channels. That equals ratings, which means ad revenue.

    Try not to feed the beast.
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    Aug 16, 2010 5:49 PM GMT
    Someone should send SB an email about premature cognitive closure.
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    Aug 16, 2010 6:06 PM GMT
    This is not really a tangent.

    I had a graduate student who just received her MS. Her research area was in Geosciences Education....and her primary focus was following a group of students, elementary, non-majors university students and majors in meteorology, and the way they learn. All were enrolled in a meteorology class of one sort or another, and they were asked questions before they took the class.

    All were asked a set of questions about major weather elements and how they perceived the reasons for those elements (for example "clouds" or "tornadoes").

    As you can imagine, all had different ideas about those elements and how they formed or why they occurred, and most had wrong, preconceived "popular fiction" notions of what they were and why they occurred.

    Several months after the conclusion of the class, each set of students were asked the same questions. Despite being taught the "correct" definitions and reasons for each of the phenomena, all sets of students returned to their original preconceived notions to a greater or lesser extent. The "lesser" extent group, as you would imagine, were the meteorology majors, who did retain most of the correct interpretation.

    But for most, the "wrong" answer that was comfortable to them, is what they returned to. They were unable to articulate the right answer, even after being presented with the facts and the science (depending upon the level).

    We realize that part of the issue maybe the way the material is presented (in other words, it was the teaching that was at issue). But I found it very interesting that people wanted to persist with the "wrong" answer even after being told they were wrong.

    Take southbeach, for example..... icon_biggrin.gif Oh, sorry. I digress.
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    Aug 16, 2010 6:34 PM GMT
    If you're neither right or left (or just slightly off-center like me), then you probably don't need this article to remind you that it's the truth that matters, not opinions (which can color your reading of the facts but not grossly distort them).
    I hear Blink might be turned into a movie with Leonardo DiCaprio.icon_smile.gif
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    Aug 16, 2010 6:48 PM GMT
    q1w2e3 saidIf you're neither right or left (or just slightly off-center like me), then you probably don't need this article to remind you that it's the truth that matters, not opinions (which can color your reading of the facts but not grossly distort them).
    I hear Blink might be turned into a movie with Leonardo DiCaprio.icon_smile.gif


    Gotcha. I may have falsely attributed you with an attitude in order to make a general point about something I am clearly frustrated with. My bad.
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    Aug 16, 2010 7:05 PM GMT
    I think this article about a homeless man perfectly sums up the idea of what we are talking about.

    A woman helped him out and let him use her card, and all he bought were necessities, not drugs or alcohol (which the NYpost cant believe), and once the story broke he has been getting all kinds of offers.

    Sounds like a good story with a happy ending and even sort of inspiring right?

    Read the comments....

    http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/manhattan/bum_gold_rush_for_creditable_guy_RKxa3sp9rkXSriISOvArON