Shoulder Pain

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    Aug 22, 2010 8:35 AM GMT
    True "Realjock" topic here.

    I have a nasty pain right up in my armpit, towards the back, where the lats meet the tricep. It's at its worst when I wake up (and for some reason, unfortunately, I invariably end up sleeping on that side).

    The past couple of weeks I went a bit overboard with my pecs/delts and have had mild "upper cross syndrome" with badly rounded shoulders, a numb chest and a very stiff neck for a few days. It's given me headaches and a general feeling of lethargy - not good.

    I did loads of rowing/rotator cuff exercises yesterday which seemed to work towards fixing the problem (I have a collar bone again, thankfully, suggesting my shoulders are rotating back) and the stiff neck/headaches I had are dwindling.

    Yet the armpit pain remains. Any suggestions as to how I can fix it ... preferably fast?
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    Aug 22, 2010 2:31 PM GMT
    Massage.
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    Aug 22, 2010 2:49 PM GMT
    stretch the pecs. Most shoulder issues are because the pecs are tight, pulling the shoulders forward.

    Find a good massage therapist that is comfortable working on your pec minor, subscapularis and all of the 4 rotator cuff muscles. It can be deep, intense (uncomfortable) work while on the table, but can really provide relief...
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    Aug 22, 2010 3:19 PM GMT
    iv suffered from Chronic Subscapular Pain syndrome since 97. I under go monthly massages from someone that specializes in myofascial release. It helps allot
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    Aug 22, 2010 4:51 PM GMT
    josephga saidiv suffered from Chronic Subscapular Pain syndrome since 97. I under go monthly massages from someone that specializes in myofascial release. It helps allot




    I agree it seems to be a problem with your subscapularis muscle, I suggest you go visit a sports injury chiropractic or physiotherapist who specializes Active Release Technique which works amazingly to relieve muscular issues. Goodluck bud
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    Aug 22, 2010 7:54 PM GMT
    Get it looked at. In general guys do not take flexibility anywhere near seriously enough and the result is pain as you get into your 30s and 40s. For me a monthly sports massage is not a luxury. If I don´t do it I get hurt. Find a good sports therapist, get their opinion and then (1) stretch properly and (2) get massage. We have no problem paying for servicing on our cars, but on our bodies we think it extravagant.
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    Aug 22, 2010 8:01 PM GMT
    Thanks all for the responses. It would seem massage is my only option here? I'm assuming ibuprofen ain't gonna cut it?

    It's actually calmed down a lot, in tandem with feeling the tightness in my back from all the "rowing" I did yesterday. I did try some yoga yesterday, too, to stretch, which I haven't done for too long ... but the "down dog" (sorry, don't know the correct name) position seemed to exacerbate the pain.

    Guess I'll find out when I wake up tomorrow if it's properly gone or not (mornings have been worst).

    Thanks again.
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    Aug 22, 2010 8:14 PM GMT
    Get it looked at. Really. Don´t mess with your shoulders. Find a GOOD sports physio or sports therapist and get a proper opinion and plan of action. You will really, really regret not spending a little money and time on prevention if you blow your shoulder. Believe me.

    And yes, muscle balance is the TOP priority. I don´t care how big you are, if you are not balanced you don´t look good and are not in good shape.

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    Aug 22, 2010 8:15 PM GMT
    Sorry to be a pain - don't know much about these things - this place is local to me - just Googled - is an osteopath the same thing and do they look ok?

    http://www.london-osteopath-massage.co.uk/about-us
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    Aug 22, 2010 8:18 PM GMT
    I´d go to a good physio/sports therapist over anything "alternative" for now. You want someone who is going to look at the muscular balance and your range of movement etc rather than someone who you know in advance is going to tell you it´s about your bones. It might be, but you want someone who allows for other answers too. Give me a postcode that works for you (in email if you prefer) and I´ll have a look for you

    edit:

    I ended up suggesting this

    http://www.sixphysio.com/

    No idea if they are good, but that´s the sort of thing you should look for.






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    Aug 22, 2010 8:44 PM GMT
    Another thing that might be worth getting looked at... if you have ever been in a car accident or received some other similar trauma to your head and neck (whiplash) is the possibility of a pinched nerve in your lower cervical or (very rarely) upper thoracic spine.

    A pinched nerve there can cause a radiculopathy (radiating pain) through your shoulders, and in the deeper muscle tissue under your lats, and into the interior of your arm.

    Most cases, an MRI will confirm this, and in my case, my doctor recommended a conservative therapy of stretching and certain neck exercises to help pull the disc back into place (or at least, off the nerve).
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    Aug 22, 2010 8:54 PM GMT
    there are all sorts of possibilities: the lats could be tight which would also explain the arm pits, there could be something funny going on with the fascia, the obvious default answer is that the front body is pulling the back out due to imbalance etc etc... bla bla bla. But we can´t see the shoulder and therefore can´t diagnose it.
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    Aug 22, 2010 9:16 PM GMT
    That's one reason I became a massage therapist. I fell at work injuring the right shoulder. Didn't work for over a year, drawing workers comp, in pain everyday. Was sent to over 30 doctors in that years time with nothing helping other than offering me muscle relaxers and a home tens unit. Then someone suggested massage. After a few treatments it was feeling little better. I realized I wanted to offer this to others. I still suffer from daily pain and aware that it's always there. But its more of a 3 on a pain scale compared to 10 that I felt for years