Can I get rid of cottage cheese abs?

  • sunsignleo

    Posts: 8

    Feb 01, 2007 11:22 PM GMT
    I am by no means fat, but I would sometimes describe myself as "skinny-fat". I definitely have put on a bit of extra body fat, but am eager to clean up my act and get back in fantastic shape, as I was a handful of years ago. My concern is about the "cottage-cheese" effect my midsection has ultimately come to resemble. Like I said, it's not ridiculously bad, but I'd rather not have any. As I drop the body fat, is my skin destined to remain fleshy, soft and dimply??? Obviously, good ole cardio and exercise will work to tone my midsection and glutes, but(t) is there anything else additionally I can do to increase the elasticity of my skin???? (especially on my glutes and abs). Please, any advice would be much appreciated.
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    Feb 01, 2007 11:58 PM GMT
    i'm not a medical professional, they may have other answers for you, but here's what i know from my own research...

    zinc, iron, vitamin E, fish oil, and lots of carotene laden (orange) fruits and veggies to help your body make vitamin D. you'll need some sun to help with the vitamin D thing, so if you're living in a place with winter, you're allowed to visit a tanning booth every so often, but only RARELY, and never long enough to burn you or make you look tan.

    and drink lots and lots of water (don't worry about retaining water weight, you're not dieting for a bodybuilding contest). plus if you drink a decent amount of water regularly, your body is actually less likely to retain it.

    all these things contribute to the health and elasticity of your skin.
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    Feb 07, 2007 4:06 PM GMT
    I've got a bit of an issue like this as well. It's frustrating that it's just one part of the body that seems to be affected. Anyway, from everything I've read, it just takes time. I've talked with people in the 40s who have had their skin tighten up so age isn't necessarily a factor. Definitely eat healthy, take care of your skin and keep working at keeping your body fat low. That's pretty much the answer I get. For what it's worth, I think my own skin has tightened up considerably over the last year. In total, it's been almost 3 years since I lost all my fat weight. For some of us, it's just a longer process I guess. Blah!
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19119

    Feb 12, 2007 4:50 PM GMT
    Hanging leg lifts work really well for this. Hang from a high bar (preferably using those arm stirrups if your gym has them) Then, before you bend your knees, move your feet about a foot or so in front of you, then begin with knee bend upwards and downwards, keeping your feet about a foot and a half in front vs, going straight up and down. Start with 3 sets of 20, then work up to 3 sets of 30, then three sets of 40. Important: at the end of each set, be sure that you hang straight up and down giving your abs a good stretch for about 10 seconds because the "stretch" is just important as the "crunch" when it comes to getting rid of that "cottage cheese" effect. Also, after the stretch, if you can whip off an extra 10 lifts, then stretch again for another 10 seconds, it will increase the effectiveness of the exercise. Once you can do 3 sets of 40 comfortably, try holding a small 5-to-10 pound weight between your feet (ankle weights are great for this too) while doing the exercise, as this dramatically increases the effectiveness of the exercise, as well as strengthens to ads. The "stretch"is also important because it keeps your abs flat and prevents you from getting that barrel stomach as your abs develop.

    Another great exercise for the "stretch" is the ab roller. Get on your hands and knees with your hands on the roller and push outward until your abdomen touches the ground, then up again. Be sure to really feel that ab stretch because the "stretch" is what tightens the skin eventually and gets rid of the cottage cheese effect as your abs strenghten and define.

    Trust me, it works! But, be patient, and remember that using the right form with each rep is much more important than the # of reps or amount of weight you use.

    You can e-mail me at: CuriousJockAZ@aol.com if you have any questions
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    Feb 16, 2007 8:19 PM GMT
    Hydration is the simple answer.

    Up your water intake and it will rid yuo of the retained water that is laying there in that cavity created by burnt out fat cells.

    Quite simply 2 litres is basic hydration, up it to metabolise fat and up it some more if you wanna see that 6 pack.

    If yuo arent geneticaly blessed with one from birth no matter what you eat then you are gonna be battling it.

    Between 4 to 5 litres is ideal but to get really cut then consider up to 7

    Sounds a lot but as with all training yuo soon adjust to it and no you aint peiing all the while, your body adjusts after 2 weeks and you just do more when you go.
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    Feb 16, 2007 10:22 PM GMT
    I'd be interested in seeing research references for that hydration thing. The medical journals have concluded that it's at best a myth and at worst quite dangerous. Hyperhydration can cause dangerously low sodium levels,and people have died from it. Current recommendations are simply to drink when you're thirsty. Some athletes, and people doing hard work in the sun, may need to take pains to rehydrate at the same rate that they're perspiring, but most people don't have that problem.
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    Feb 17, 2007 1:37 PM GMT
    No mindagarden the only thing that the medical journals have stated and the press has repeatedly misreported are that if you were to sit down and glug that all in one go.

    There are absolutely no bad reviews about sensibly consuming water throughout the day. The only issue on sodium is when people have drunk in excess of 2 1/2 litres in one very shor period and from a point of relative dehydration.

    As for studies well the whole osmis thing is basic biology and its impact on organ function is too
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    Feb 17, 2007 1:38 PM GMT
    whoops sorry for the bad typing doing two things at once!
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    Feb 17, 2007 3:28 PM GMT
    First off I want to say that your really cute,


    What I think you can do to get fast abs, i would try swimming. twice a week with gym 3 times aweek in no time you should get those abs!

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    Feb 17, 2007 11:47 PM GMT
    Actually bfg1, what I asked about was any proof that drinking excess water reduces body fat. The only related studies that I've found merely concluded that drinking a glass of water, or watery food (soup) during a meal increased satiation, so people ate less.

    Eur. J. Clin. Nutr. 47:815-819
    Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 67:1170-1177

    The two-liters-a-day thing is in fact an urban legend that appears to have originated, ironically, from misreporting of an NRC study by the popular press. It now appears to have achieved the status of religious dogma. Seven liters a day would certainly be harmful to many people, especially if they are also dieting.

    But let's start a new thread and not hijack this one.
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    Feb 18, 2007 12:59 PM GMT
    7 litres a day is not harming you will find no studies to back that up whatsoever Ive been through that argument a million times. But as you say lets not detract.

    The whole pokiothermic effect of water gets alot of abuse and to be honest wether its ice cold or not the difference it makes is small in comparison to other aspects of daily life. Hence I didnt start that whole discussion as there are too many other factors at play that create a claorific burn when digesting large amounts of water.

    As for the 2 litres not its not an urban myth for want of a better word its a rule of thumb based on the studies as each individual is different as is there environment.

    What makes me laugh in the fitness world is as long as something fits in with peoples readily accepted ideaologys they are quite happy to take stuff as verbatum. BUT as soon as you suggest something new its always "where's the study".

    Personaly I would rather go on what people have achieved and how it has benefited them and on the understanding of what is basic human biology. ie osmosis is the process of movement between cells due to differing pressures and concentrations of fluid. If those cells you are trying to deplete ie if the cells are dehydrated ie container greater concentration of slats et al then transference will not occur, or will do so at a restricted rate.

    Some things you learn the basics of so long ago its not necesary to retain the who wrote what merely the knowledge it contains, such as how to drive a car you just simply do it as you know it works and that is the way to do it.

    How you implemented it and how it helped you achieve your goal is far more beneficial in my book. More importantly what it did for you and can yuo isolate it to that factor.

  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Apr 08, 2007 11:55 AM GMT
    Yup...this is a common problem that a lot of guys suffer from...
    This "skinny-fat" as you call it is a guy who's basically in-shape worksout some but still has usually a ring around the middle they can't get rid of
    Usually this is lifestyle based and needs a little alteration in the way we view eating...working out and generally looking at the world
    First thing is diet...
    gotta deep six the fast foods...the processed stuff
    sorry...the alcohol has to be minimized drastically...it's a killer when it comes to losing those few extra pounds
    get yourself on a good wholebody weight training workout that is heavy on the core set of muscles...legs-back and abs
    cardio is good but do not rely on it
    it won't get you where you wanna be
    Good luck my man ...
    given the pic you posted>>>you do this you're gonna be irresistable...lol
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    Apr 08, 2007 7:29 PM GMT
    This isn't so much more advice but just a response. You're adorable NOW. Why worry about it? :-)

    Troy

    P.S. When did we all start to obsess about our bodies (I'm including myself here - not accusing others). Was it when Marky Mark starting appearing on billboards? It seems to have gotten worse the past five years. All the straight young pups I see that are 18 are all totally ripped now. Sheesh.

    Maybe I should start another forum thread but I'm sure this has been discussed to death here before.

  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Apr 14, 2007 7:17 AM GMT
    Sun u look great. I think the secret is not weighing yourself but keeping track of your body fat %. Keep up the core training and ab workout. I also agree stongly with keeping well hydrated throughout the day. Alot is genetic if it is like coliflower dimples or cellulite, It won't be easy, but don't let it get u down. It can be done my neighbor is fair skinned and lost man boobs and the tire--He is now a triathelete. Good Luck to you!! I am 5'11 175 30w I used to have a 33 waist but never had loose or dimpled skin- I thank my parents for Italian genetics, however it is hard for me to bulk up. Everyone has something they would like to change. Ciao
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    Apr 14, 2007 11:44 PM GMT
    Chronic Stress can influence the spare tire problem. Cortisol is produced in the abdominal area. Excess of cafine can cause cortisol levels to rise.

    Drink Green tea to replace coffee if you do. Your water intake is important, if you don't drink enough water your body will retain all the water in can from everything else you eat or drink at a cellular level. Sometimes too it is genetics.

    Do the best you can with what you got. You really look great.
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    Jun 18, 2007 2:58 PM GMT
    I'm a little late to the thread but GEEZ do I know this problem. It was one of the first things I told my trainer: "I want to lose the skinny fat!"

    A couple of things I'm curious about and wonder if anyone has thoughts on are:

    a) does working the obliques and lats help? My thinking is that, although it might be 'cheating', shouldn't this help to 'pull' the love handles up. Am I smoking something here?

    b) caffeine and cortisol?! Please say it's not true. I'm not sure I could live without coffee!
  • TonyD

    Posts: 168

    Nov 29, 2007 7:01 AM GMT
    A good qualitifed esthetician can help you improve your skin quality and help that part of the equation.

    Of course, good diet, water and all of that will help...however, genetic propensity and AGE dictate much of this...A good esthetician (skin specialist) can help reverse and/or minimize this problem. Contact me through this site if you want more specific info.

    A
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    Nov 30, 2007 3:06 AM GMT
    Rub Prep H on your mid section. It'll tighten it up for you.
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    Mar 01, 2008 8:31 PM GMT
    I agree with a lot of what's been said here about specific exercises and especially the water aspects. Research has shown that a person can safely drink as much as 10 liters of water per day. All the shit saying less is urban legand and misinterpretation. Also water can help by increasing metabolism to rid the last of the remaining subcutaneous fat to skin connections.

    In 2003, Boschmann et al. published a study demonstrating that drinking 500 mL of cold water (22 degrees Celsius) increased metabolism by 30% compared to baseline, while drinking water at 37 degrees Celsius produced a smaller increase in metabolism.

    Boschmann, et al. (2003). ”Water-Induced Thermogenesis.” Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 88 (12).

    Hopefully this adds a little sense to the water debate.


    Good luck with your efforts bro.
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    Mar 01, 2008 9:58 PM GMT
    One other possible suggestion for you, you might try a couple supplements known as Lutein, and Zeaxanthin. There have been impressive scientific results showing that 10mg oral lutein supplement increased skin hydration by 38% and skin elasticity by 8%. The placebo controlled study found even better results with both oral and topical use of the Lutein/Zeaxanthin provided even better results, increasing skin hydration by 60% and skin elasticity by 20 percent.

    So you know, lutein, is a naturally occurring nutrient found in dark green leafy vegetables like spinach, kale and collard greens, as well as broccoli, egg yolks, and corn. Lutein is found in many areas of the body including in tissues in the eye, blood, skin, brain and breast. Lutein is NOT produced by the body and so it must be ingested daily through food or supplements.
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    Mar 28, 2008 8:53 AM GMT
    mindgarden saidI'd be interested in seeing research references for that hydration thing. The medical journals have concluded that it's at best a myth and at worst quite dangerous. Hyperhydration can cause dangerously low sodium levels,and people have died from it. Current recommendations are simply to drink when you're thirsty. Some athletes, and people doing hard work in the sun, may need to take pains to rehydrate at the same rate that they're perspiring, but most people don't have that problem.


    I've actually heard that if you're thirsty, you're already dehydrated.

    But this has never really made sense to me....

    What I've been told is that you should drink water until your pee is clear. If your pee is clear and you're peeing often, then you're hydrated.

    But yes, it's definitely important to keep your electrolyte balance up. Make sure you're getting potassium and sodium!
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    Mar 28, 2008 9:34 PM GMT
    mindgarden saidActually bfg1, what I asked about was any proof that drinking excess water reduces body fat. The only related studies that I've found merely concluded that drinking a glass of water, or watery food (soup) during a meal increased satiation, so people ate less.

    Eur. J. Clin. Nutr. 47:815-819
    Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 67:1170-1177

    The two-liters-a-day thing is in fact an urban legend that appears to have originated, ironically, from misreporting of an NRC study by the popular press. It now appears to have achieved the status of religious dogma. Seven liters a day would certainly be harmful to many people, especially if they are also dieting.

    But let's start a new thread and not hijack this one.


    I forgot all about this thread and have just sent yuo the key study on private mail but for others to read:

    http://jcem.endojournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/88/12/6015

    A good place to start learning more about it is:

    http://www.drdarden.com/readTopic.do?id=383704
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 28, 2008 9:43 PM GMT
    Aaron_Matthew said[quote][cite]mindgarden said[/cite]I'd be interested in seeing research references for that hydration thing. The medical journals have concluded that it's at best a myth and at worst quite dangerous. Hyperhydration can cause dangerously low sodium levels,and people have died from it. Current recommendations are simply to drink when you're thirsty. Some athletes, and people doing hard work in the sun, may need to take pains to rehydrate at the same rate that they're perspiring, but most people don't have that problem.


    I've actually heard that if you're thirsty, you're already dehydrated.

    But this has never really made sense to me....

    [quote]

    to answer your question re thirst response

    As hydration decreases electrolyte concentrations increase this effects the osmotic pressure of cells the body responds with its natural survival instinct to tell you that it is time to top up before it impacts on other body functions. So yes thirst is indeed the indicator that your are already dehydrated

  • Squarejaw

    Posts: 1035

    Mar 28, 2008 10:29 PM GMT
    Thanks so much for the link, bfg! I'm one of those guys who looks for the studies. It's not enough to see what people with good results are doing, because you still need to isolate effective tactics from the ineffective.

    Anyway, the abstract you cite says that drinking 2 liters of water a day will burn 400kJ, or about 95 calories. That doesn't seem like much, but over a year that adds up to 9.6 pounds.

    The scientists used water at 72 degrees Fahrenheit. Who drinks that? The water in my fridge is 36 degrees. And my ice water is even colder. I'd like to see the metabolic effects of that.
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    Mar 28, 2008 10:35 PM GMT
    there are studies out there to back up the colder water but the ones I have seen arent backed by stacks of peer review but the same principles apply

    4 litres ice cold a day in effect burns up 1400 calories a week. But when you show people the equation they neglect to take into account all th eother bodily processes ie the activity involved in moving water from mouth to toilet. I know it sounds crazy but it all impacts on the figure.

    I shall do some hunting, I did have all the links before but lessons learnt to back up all my files I lost years of work and research when it literaly blew up!!!! Not to mention needing a new carpet! icon_redface.gif