DISCLAIMER: Sorry if I use big words for the next 9 weeks.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 24, 2010 9:09 AM GMT
    I'm studying for the GREs (lol again) for the next 9 weeks. A good method in learning new (and seldom used) vocabulary words is to use them in a sentence that is relevant to you in every day speech.

    I will practice by using many GRE vocabulary when discoursing, arguing, flaming, or just verbally meandering in these threads.

    In the case someone ridicules me with something along the lines of, "oooooh you're trying to impress me with big words...such a big boy because you use big words," ...no, I'm not a big boy. I'm PRACTICING to become a big boy so that I can receive a big grade on the GRE, go to a big school, get a big PhD, and then in return have big money and buy big hookers with big dicks and asses.

    In the meantime, should some grandiloquent neophyte berate me for practicing vocabulary words that I have indoctrinated myself with through rigorous studying, I'll simply post a link to this thread so that:

    1. I don't have to explain myself again
    2. They can read how predictable they are
    3. They can feel bad about being predictable and most likely throw up a slew of defense mechanisms (probably ad hominem attacks)
    4. I can feel smug

    [edit] Feel free to add to this thread by using complicated words, even if the sentence is completely irrelevant to this topic, as Bunjamon generously did.
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Aug 24, 2010 9:49 AM GMT
    Good luck! The better your PhD, the more pulchritudinous the hookers. icon_wink.gif
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    Aug 24, 2010 9:50 AM GMT
    Bunjamon saidGood luck! The better your PhD, the more pulchritudinous the hookers. icon_wink.gif


    You've used a GRE word. And I know what it means! I'm so happy right now. icon_biggrin.gif
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Aug 24, 2010 9:53 AM GMT
    Whatever I can do to help you out. icon_cool.gif
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    Aug 24, 2010 10:05 AM GMT
    I am especially fond of calipigious men. Anyway, are we to be exposed to these diurnal circumlocutions for long? If so I will have to defenestrate you or even deport you!
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    Aug 24, 2010 10:08 AM GMT
    Thank you my French chauvinist. I learned "defenestrate." icon_cool.gif


    Lostboy said...or even deport you!

    Where would I be deported back to? Back to Seattle where I lived? Back to Los Angeles where my mom lived? Back to Los Angeles (again) where my grandma lived? Back to (I'm not kidding here) West Hollywood where my great grandma lived?


    Lostboy saidAnyway, are we to be exposed to these diurnal circumlocutions for long?

    You have the option to read these at night, not during the day. And I already said (in the title of the thread) 9 weeks. I don't know how to be any more candid than that.

    Diurnal more so means existing during the day. If you mean to say "routine" a good word for that is: perfunctory.
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    Aug 24, 2010 10:12 AM GMT
    When i was going my phd we had an email to all grad students informing us that the Dean´s cat, Mrs Tiggy, had been found several times in the Turner Room and that if we found her we were to defenestrate her with vim and alacrity. I wish I had saved it, but won´t ever forget it icon_smile.gif

    I needed to ignore your 9 weeks in order to ask the question, you boob. May the winter rime freeze your wibbly bits.

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    Aug 24, 2010 10:13 AM GMT
    Lostboy saidWhen i was going my phd we had an email to all grad students informing us that the Dean´s cat, Mrs Tiggy, had been found several times in the Turner Room and that if we found here we were to defenestrate her with vim and alacrity. I wish I had saved it, but won´t ever forget it icon_smile.gif



    HAHAHAHAHAH that's hilarious!
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    Aug 24, 2010 10:15 AM GMT
    actually it was the dean´s note which suggested the phrase "defenestrate - or deport" to me. It is brilliant.
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    Aug 24, 2010 10:15 AM GMT
    Lostboy said
    I needed to ignore your 9 weeks in order to ask the question, you boob. May the winter rime freeze your wibbly bits.


    You'll keep posting. And Winter doesn't exist in Los Angeles. No no. It will be fucking 80 degrees until November, and still 65 degrees until January when it goes back up to 70 degrees. This is Fahrenheit fyi.

    You know, I enjoy your loquaciousness. icon_cool.gif
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    Aug 24, 2010 10:23 AM GMT
    the locution "defenestrate - or deport" plays with the etymology of the words...

    deport is actually from the latin meaning "carry or bear away", but those aware of the links between latin fenestre and french "fenêtre" might think also of "porte" and "de-porte" the cat in a way analagous to its defenestration.

    My supervisor was fond of such multilingual puns, often making them in Classical Greek, Latin, Hebrew, Aramaic and Syriac.

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    Aug 24, 2010 10:57 AM GMT
    So this is your verbal panacea? Good idea...just as long as your approach to this is not perfunctory.

    ...fuck this I give up...I am bereft of sleep and fucking tired from staring at pharmacological drugs and about ready to eviscerate the next professor that says I have to learn more (this shit exasperates the hell out of me)

    Best of luck with your exam prep!
    Standardized tests are borderline worthlessicon_exclaim.gif

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    Aug 24, 2010 11:00 AM GMT
    this, btw, explains why when proofing work by american PhD students you would find words that were not being used quite correctly and looked like they had been learnt from a list.

    They had. What is it meant to prove?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Aug 24, 2010 11:09 AM GMT
    For an english major I find this exceedingly boring, anyone have a word to describe that?
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    Aug 24, 2010 11:22 AM GMT
    JB82 said

    Diurnal more so means existing during the day.


    It also means something on a 24 hour cycle, such as the diurnal component of the ocean tides.
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    Aug 24, 2010 11:27 AM GMT
    and it means daily. And there was nothing wrong with "would" icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Aug 24, 2010 11:42 AM GMT
    jprichva saidThere is, however, a correct spelling of "callipygian".

    And my understanding is that it means Rubens-esque.


    haha... I had a feeling that the english form was different from the Spanish, but couldn´t quite find it. Callypygian does sound better. It does describe beautiful buttocks though. I shall change my post

    edit. No I won´t. Both forms are possible in english according to the interweb Miriam-Webster.
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    Aug 24, 2010 12:20 PM GMT
    Lostboy saidI....are we to be exposed to these diurnal circumlocutions for long?


    Good on ya! At least you get to use those words..I used 'diurnal' recently in a meeting and someone whispered "why is he talking about urinals?"icon_rolleyes.gif

    Never use a large word when a diminutive one will do.icon_wink.gif
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    Aug 24, 2010 12:21 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle said
    Lostboy saidthis, btw, explains why when proofing work by american PhD students you would find words that were not being used quite correctly and looked like they had been learnt fr


    Funny, I already see the conditional word "would" used incorrectly in the sentence above. Get together there, lost. icon_razz.gif


    That was correct sir, sorry.. this is not a conditional "would".... it is the "would" of habit, used in sentences like:

    "At the age of eight, I would always go to the pond where i would feed the ducks and collect tadpoles in jars, after which I would feed them to maturity in my room. I would, of course, release them as soon as they were full-grown."

    See? Not a single conditional... best brush up on some english grammar there sir
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    Aug 24, 2010 12:22 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI was told by a British language teacher that would was only to be used as a conditional. Such as if I were to choose I would choose him.

    I was heavily scolded not to use would in that sense. I actually learned to appreciate this later. The word "would" has become so generic.


    And in British english, one doesnt use the subjunctive "I were" ... so your teacher would have properly said "if I was to choose him"
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    Aug 24, 2010 12:23 PM GMT
    OK, a grammar fight YAY this thread is no longer boring
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    Aug 24, 2010 12:27 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI was told by a British language teacher that would was only to be used as a conditional. Such as if I were to choose I would choose him.

    I was heavily scolded not to use would in that sense. I actually learned to appreciate this later. The word "would" has become so generic.


    The incorrect use of the word "would" in American english is seen in the following:

    "If I would choose, I would choose him"

    This is the use of would on either side of the conditional sentence, strictly speaking, it should only be used on the end of your sentence, namely the conditional clause... the first part should be a simple past tense as such:

    "If I went home early, I would arrive early"

    And in American english, the subjunctive is often used instead of the simple past:

    "If I were you, I would say it differently"

    And in British, simple past again:

    "If I was you, I would say it differently"

    So in fact your sentence would be: "If I chose, I would choose him" but nobody ever says that.... so the grammar is pointless lol
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    Aug 24, 2010 12:31 PM GMT
    What's a GRE?

  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Aug 24, 2010 12:34 PM GMT
    i have a gre word bank from when i took it if you want it.
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    Aug 24, 2010 12:37 PM GMT
    this ENTIRE thread is turning me on beyond the capacity for words!

    oh talk academic to me, you big, hard brains you!

    talk me harder!

    HARDER!

    icon_twisted.gif