May I ask a question? What is the difference between the "Tea Party" and the "Right Wing" of the Republican Party?

  • silverfox

    Posts: 3178

    Aug 26, 2010 2:23 AM GMT
    To me......it seems to be the same thing.

    Thoughts?
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    Aug 26, 2010 2:26 AM GMT
    smegma
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    Aug 26, 2010 2:33 AM GMT
    I agree, 2 sides of the same coin, and working towards the same goals. A guiding force of the Tea Party is Dick Arrmey, a former Republican leader in Congress. Republican Party fingerprints are all over the Teabaggers, but they manipulate them as surrogates, who do their bidding.

    Problem is, that works on the national level, but these unruly children have caused trouble at local levels, when they've opposed Republican Party candidates. Having opened this Pandora's Box to confound Democrats, some of what they've unleashed is biting them, too. Quelle domage.
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    Aug 26, 2010 3:34 AM GMT
    The "Tea Party" is not one group but a loose mixture of several. There is an element that is as you describe it, on the right of the Republican Party. Many others do not support those right wing positions. They favor limited Government, and against excessive taxes, and against growing the deficit.
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    Aug 26, 2010 4:33 AM GMT
    332351.full.gif
  • solak

    Posts: 493

    Aug 26, 2010 5:32 AM GMT
    http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/teaparty.htm
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    Aug 26, 2010 9:04 AM GMT
    How many Democrat canidates have been backed by the Tea Party? How many state Democrat platforms have been developed from the Tea Party's views?

    Perhaps my assumptions are wrong... I haven't heard of anyone or any state platform.
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Aug 26, 2010 9:35 AM GMT
    IAmDestr0n said332351.full.gif


    If it Smells like a right wing nut? ........... It's a right wing nut
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    Aug 26, 2010 9:44 AM GMT
    solak saidhttp://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/teaparty.htm


    This is part of the teabaggers' delusion. The original Boston Tea Party was about "taxation without representation"; the current tea party is about sour grapes that they participated in an election yet their candidates lost the presidency and the majority in the house and senate. So they now have "no representation". Since democracy is only valid if the people *you* vote for win, and of course if your people win, then the other side should just STFU, don't insult the presidency, you're unpatriotic, why do you hate america, etc.

    Given how they're being led to vote against their own interests by massive amounts of money from very rich people (ex. the Koch family) and publicized by Fox News (totally corporatist), it's a frightening situation.
  • captproton

    Posts: 316

    Aug 26, 2010 11:26 AM GMT
    Degrees of stupidity.
  • darkeyedresol...

    Posts: 171

    Aug 26, 2010 11:38 AM GMT
    Tea Party is a lot of disaffected Republican voters who felt the party left them during the Bush era when it comes to increased amounts of spending and entitlement growth. But its not one thing, its rather ambiguous in terms of what its goals are. It seems to be a lot of Ron Paul supporters who were libertarian, anti-war, and fiscally conservative Republicans that really dislike Obama. They are successor to the Periot people from the 90s.

    The Right Wing of the Party usually means Social Conservative Republicans, or anyone who is more conservative than the mainstream of the Party. These people are a part of the party and considered part of the Establishment.
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    Aug 26, 2010 1:27 PM GMT
    LMAO!

    That is funny. icon_lol.gif

    IAmDestr0n said332351.full.gif
  • rioriz

    Posts: 1056

    Aug 26, 2010 4:21 PM GMT
    darkeyedresolve saidTea Party is a lot of disaffected Republican voters who felt the party left them during the Bush era when it comes to increased amounts of spending and entitlement growth. But its not one thing, its rather ambiguous in terms of what its goals are. It seems to be a lot of Ron Paul supporters who were libertarian, anti-war, and fiscally conservative Republicans that really dislike Obama. They are successor to the Periot people from the 90s.

    The Right Wing of the Party usually means Social Conservative Republicans, or anyone who is more conservative than the mainstream of the Party. These people are a part of the party and considered part of the Establishment.


    I think this, intellectually and being serious, is probablly the best answer in this thread.
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    Aug 26, 2010 5:27 PM GMT
    rioriz said
    darkeyedresolve saidTea Party is a lot of disaffected Republican voters who felt the party left them during the Bush era when it comes to increased amounts of spending and entitlement growth. But its not one thing, its rather ambiguous in terms of what its goals are. It seems to be a lot of Ron Paul supporters who were libertarian, anti-war, and fiscally conservative Republicans that really dislike Obama. They are successor to the Periot people from the 90s.

    The Right Wing of the Party usually means Social Conservative Republicans, or anyone who is more conservative than the mainstream of the Party. These people are a part of the party and considered part of the Establishment.


    I think this, intellectually and being serious, is probablly the best answer in this thread.


    I think that it's not borne out by reality, though - they're libertarian in terms of the fantasy that they don't need to pay taxes but not in terms of gays being on equal terms or women controlling their own bodies.
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    Aug 26, 2010 5:50 PM GMT
    darkeyedresolve saidTea Party is a lot of disaffected Republican voters who felt the party left them during the Bush era when it comes to increased amounts of spending and entitlement growth. But its not one thing, its rather ambiguous in terms of what its goals are. It seems to be a lot of Ron Paul supporters who were libertarian, anti-war, and fiscally conservative Republicans that really dislike Obama. They are successor to the Periot people from the 90s.

    The Right Wing of the Party usually means Social Conservative Republicans, or anyone who is more conservative than the mainstream of the Party. These people are a part of the party and considered part of the Establishment.


    This is the best response in here, although "rightwing" can be used both in reference to hardline social conservatism and hardline economic conservatism/libertarianism/classical liberalism -- it depends on the context some times. I will add that the tea party is generally more into social liberty as well economic liberty rather than the conventional idea of rightwing conservatism that advocates for economic liberty but tries to restrict social liberties if they don't align with the religious values being espoused.

    Tea partiers can include all sorts of people with different shades of conservatism and libertarianism though. They mainly unite under wanting lower taxes and less big government entitlements and less spending.

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    Aug 26, 2010 6:59 PM GMT
    IAmDestr0n said332351.full.gif


    Couldn't say it any better.
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    Aug 26, 2010 8:08 PM GMT
    jprichva saidBy a recent CBS poll, the Tea Party overlaps with the right-wing Republicans by 87%.


    The majority of tea partiers voted in a straw poll for Ron Paul, which shows that the majority is in favor of social tolerance and liberty.
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    Aug 26, 2010 8:13 PM GMT
    Not a fucking thing. No Difference.
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    Aug 26, 2010 8:18 PM GMT
    silverfox1 saidTo me......it seems to be the same thing.

    Thoughts?



    The Tea Party is made up of people who are angry about government spending and high taxes. The goal is to vote out all the rinos and democrats and replace them with candidates who support less spending and less taxes. On Tuesday night we sent another big government rino packing, Lisa Murkowski.
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    Aug 26, 2010 8:23 PM GMT
    ariesnvancouver saidNot a fucking thing. No Difference.


    umm, big difference.
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    Aug 26, 2010 8:25 PM GMT
    darkeyedresolve saidTea Party is a lot of disaffected Republican voters who felt the party left them during the Bush era when it comes to increased amounts of spending and entitlement growth. But its not one thing, its rather ambiguous in terms of what its goals are. It seems to be a lot of Ron Paul supporters who were libertarian, anti-war, and fiscally conservative Republicans that really dislike Obama. They are successor to the Periot people from the 90s.

    The Right Wing of the Party usually means Social Conservative Republicans, or anyone who is more conservative than the mainstream of the Party. These people are a part of the party and considered part of the Establishment.



    I am a Tea Party member and everyone who attends the meetings aren't only dissatisfied with Obama and the Dems, but also Bush and the Republicans in Congress who supported big government spending. We just want it to stop. No more spending and less taxes.


    To me Bush was a liberal on fiscal issues. On social issues, Bush was the biggest right wing president we ever had. Social Conservatives were the only group behind him when he left office. You might find a few social conservatives at a tea party meeting, but its fiscal issues that bring them there.
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    Aug 26, 2010 9:56 PM GMT
    CHRISMA said
    darkeyedresolve saidTea Party is a lot of disaffected Republican voters who felt the party left them during the Bush era when it comes to increased amounts of spending and entitlement growth. But its not one thing, its rather ambiguous in terms of what its goals are. It seems to be a lot of Ron Paul supporters who were libertarian, anti-war, and fiscally conservative Republicans that really dislike Obama. They are successor to the Periot people from the 90s.

    The Right Wing of the Party usually means Social Conservative Republicans, or anyone who is more conservative than the mainstream of the Party. These people are a part of the party and considered part of the Establishment.



    I am a Tea Party member and everyone who attends the meetings aren't only dissatisfied with Obama and the Dems, but also Bush and the Republicans in Congress who supported big government spending. We just want it to stop. No more spending and less taxes.


    To me Bush was a liberal on fiscal issues. On social issues, Bush was the biggest right wing president we ever had. Social Conservatives were the only group behind him when he left office. You might find a few social conservatives at a tea party meeting, but its fiscal issues that bring them there.


    And that's the worst combination of all, a fiscal liberal and social conservative. UGH
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    Aug 26, 2010 10:10 PM GMT
    mocktwinkie said
    jprichva saidBy a recent CBS poll, the Tea Party overlaps with the right-wing Republicans by 87%.


    The majority of tea partiers voted in a straw poll for Ron Paul, which shows that the majority is in favor of social tolerance and liberty.


    When I look at candidates to vote for I look at three things, Financial Issues, Foreign Policy Issues, and Social Issues. In that order of importance. I voted for Ron Paul in the GOP Primary in 2008.

    Ron Paul on Financial Issues: Lower Taxes, Less Government, AGREE
    Ron Paul on Foreign Policy: Iraq War Mistake, AGREE
    Ron Paul on Social Issues: Legalize Marijuana, AGREE, Pro Second Amendment, AGREE, Pro Life Abortion, DISAGREE, and I dont think he supports gay marriage, so DISAGREE.

    Ron Paul meets me probably 80% of the way, which is more than I can say for any other candidate that ran. I chose to vote for Libertarian Bob Barr in the General Election, who I agree with about 80% of the time as well.
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    Aug 26, 2010 10:28 PM GMT
    CHRISMA said
    mocktwinkie said
    jprichva saidBy a recent CBS poll, the Tea Party overlaps with the right-wing Republicans by 87%.


    The majority of tea partiers voted in a straw poll for Ron Paul, which shows that the majority is in favor of social tolerance and liberty.


    When I look at candidates to vote for I look at three things, Financial Issues, Foreign Policy Issues, and Social Issues. In that order of importance. I voted for Ron Paul in the GOP Primary in 2008.

    Ron Paul on Financial Issues: Lower Taxes, Less Government, AGREE
    Ron Paul on Foreign Policy: Iraq War Mistake, AGREE
    Ron Paul on Social Issues: Legalize Marijuana, AGREE, Pro Second Amendment, AGREE, Pro Life Abortion, DISAGREE, and I dont think he supports gay marriage, so DISAGREE.

    Ron Paul meets me probably 80% of the way, which is more than I can say for any other candidate that ran. I chose to vote for Libertarian Bob Barr in the General Election, who I agree with about 80% of the time as well.


    Ron Paul believes that there is no constitutional protection for private sexual behavior and believes that the states should be able to criminalize homosexual contact. He introduced federal legislation to prevent the supreme court from hearing any case that would result in a finding of constitutional protections for gay people, reversing Lawrence v
    Kansas which did away with sodomy laws.. He supported DOMA which tossed out the longstanding full faith and credit clause so that states can make their own laws wrt to marriage and other states would honor them, specifically to prevent states from having to recognize same-sex marriages from other states.

    You live in Mass, a liberal state that did away with sodomy laws, but if you lived in Kansas or any number of other states he believes that that the state has the right to jail you for having sex with another man and in fact he introduced legislation to make that happen.

    These are facts. So to gloss over it with "he doesn't support gay marriage" is almost at the level of lie.
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    Aug 26, 2010 10:40 PM GMT
    CHRISMA said
    mocktwinkie said
    jprichva saidBy a recent CBS poll, the Tea Party overlaps with the right-wing Republicans by 87%.


    The majority of tea partiers voted in a straw poll for Ron Paul, which shows that the majority is in favor of social tolerance and liberty.


    ...

    Ron Paul meets me probably 80% of the way, which is more than I can say for any other candidate that ran.


    Ronald Reagan held to the 80% rule - in that you simply aren't ever going to have a candidate (especially for the POTUS) who is 100% ideologically agreeable to the entire party.

    If you can however, produce a candidate that meets 80% of what your party's expectations are, they have a good chance of gaining the widest support.

    As for me - Dr. Ron Paul and Campaign for Liberty guy here.

    Thing is, wherever Liberty is championed - I'm for it.

    Small government, responsible and limited spending, and non-interference in what matters are reserved to the States via the 10th Amendment.

    It makes good sense - large, intrusive, socialist government is counter-intuitive to the American soul, and is counter-productive in nearly every regard, as it collects all the power to a few elites in the government, and their allies who do business with them: regardless of whether that government is run by (R) or (D) politicians.

    That model might work for small countries and/or largely mono-ethnic nations in Europe, but we do still have a tradition of personal liberty in the USA, even if its last embers are being fanned by the Tea Party Movement.

    And I'd say a great many of us who are Tea Party members, or sympathize with them as I do, are fairly socially liberal.