OMG, Tuna!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 27, 2010 5:50 AM GMT
    Hello folks! I have been taking diet/eating advise seriously from my trainer and a gym-provided dietitian. All of the individuals [and even folks on this site] state that their last meal is LOTS of veggies and Tuna.

    I know its cheap to come by and comes in many forms (Canned, Pouch, Steaks [all in which i have tried]), but I am about sick of tuna; it is hard to eat 'healthy' when your stomach turns at the sight/smell of something.

    My ultimate question is as follows: are there any other 'lean proteins' that i can eat with my final meal (salad) besides tuna? Does it have to be tuna? Does it have to be a meat? I usually add 4 hard boiled egg whites and one whole hard boiled egg to the salad anyway.

    ANY advice would be greatly appreciated! Thank you all in advance.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 27, 2010 6:47 AM GMT
    There are a wide variety of proteins, both natural and isolated.
    In addition to those you mentioned, there is also whey, soy, rice, and legume proteins as well.
    A balanced diet containing a variety of proteins (ideally from natural sources) is what I eat.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 27, 2010 7:01 AM GMT
    GAMRican saidThere are a wide variety of proteins, both natural and isolated.
    In addition to those you mentioned, there is also whey, soy, rice, and legume proteins as well.
    A balanced diet containing a variety of proteins (ideally from natural sources) is what I eat.


    Hmmm, I never considered a legume a protein. However, I eat plenty beans. As far a whey, I drink whey protein shakes prior and after my weight lifting days and just one hour prior to my cardio/core days.

    My diet has been pretty balanced. I am also loosing weight from it, however, everyone that i seem to ask nutrition advice to seems to point me to the "last meal" option of Salad/Veggies and Tuna. I am SO sick of tuna, lol.

    Is it advisable, or would you suggest just sticking with (additional) egg whites? Do i HAVE to eat tuna, or for that matter, a lean protein, if i am eating egg whites as well?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 27, 2010 12:29 PM GMT
    tofu!

    tofu has little to no flavor, so if you have the cooking skills you can pretty much make it into anything!

    the last 6 months or so my boyfriend and i have been substituting tofu for a normal mean/protein for dinner once or twice a week! you'd be surprised all the stuff you can do with it!
  • shirty

    Posts: 290

    Aug 27, 2010 12:33 PM GMT
    Why not try another type of fish? There are so many - you are sure to find one you like.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 27, 2010 12:49 PM GMT
    What's wrong with chicken or turkey?

    Or, if you don't want meat, what about beans/pulses - lentils for example!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 27, 2010 5:24 PM GMT
    Pork: The Other White Meat
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 27, 2010 5:34 PM GMT
    shirty saidWhy not try another type of fish? There are so many - you are sure to find one you like.

    I always like salmon, and I'll even eat it from a can, or cooked just about anyway except blackened, can do it as a salad, too. And it's got the good omega-3 fatty acids, although some are lost if it's smoked.

    Makes a quick and easy snack for me, a fish I can eat at room temperature, no prep needed. And I still often have it like I did over 50 years ago as a kid, an odd practice my grandmother had, of serving canned salmon in a bit of white vinegar.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 27, 2010 5:46 PM GMT
    Thank you for the suggestions and options everyone! I eat and like everything, except coconut (eww). I have never been taught anything about nutrition and proper eating habits also, have never been physically active until about 5 years ago.

    All that is drilled into my head, now, is "lean proteins:" Skinless chicken, fish (especially tuna or salmon) and lean (95-97%) beef, however, i slowed my beef intake. Chicken is so versatile, however, I do not know a lot of uses for fish. I guess thats why i am getting tired of it.

    I come from a "Southern-Fried" family where everything is either twice baked, fried or boiled in oil; the word "diet" was not part of anyones vocabulary. My diet/food intake has change dramatically now, thanks to my Ex-Marine personal trainer, gym provided nutritionist and determination.

    I really like this site! There are a lot of good folks here.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 27, 2010 5:46 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    shirty saidWhy not try another type of fish? There are so many - you are sure to find one you like.

    I always like salmon, and I'll even eat it from a can, or cooked just about anyway except blackened, can do it as a salad, too. And it's got the good omega-3 fatty acids, although some are lost if it's smoked.

    Makes a quick and easy snack for me, a fish I can eat at room temperature, no prep needed. And I still often have it like I did over 50 years ago as a kid, an odd practice my grandmother had, of serving canned salmon in a bit of white vinegar.


    Canned salmon in white vinegar.... for some reason that sounds extremely healthy as well as extremely disgusting icon_razz.gif

    For who's in BC or close by, you might have heard about the record salmon numbers in the Fraser River, so make sure to stock your freezer with salmon now that there's plenty and the prices are dropping like a pair of old underpants.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 27, 2010 5:48 PM GMT
    NickFit saidWhat's wrong with chicken or turkey?

    Those are among my own favorites. One of the latest ways we have it lately is the rotisserie chickens that a lot of the larger supermarkets are selling now. A whole cooked chicken for like $5 to $6, a great bargain, and it's already COOKED & warm, which gets MY attention.

    And you often have flavor choices, with things like lemon, or barbeque. You take it home and it's ready to eat, a super-easy way to have a few friends over for a meal. You microwave some veggies, maybe have a carb like rice or potato, extremely simple. And it beats KFC by a mile in my view for a healthy chicken meal.

    Afterwards, you carve up the leftover, and put the slices in zip-lock bags or Tupperware to refrigerate. I prefer bags because there's usually less air inside, and disposable. Then you've got lean finger snacks for a couple of days, can make sandwiches, too, or soups, salads, etc. And all for around $6, with no hassle of cooking it yourself in the oven.

    I never paid attention to those chickens rotating in those glass rotisseries in the supermarkets, until a BF introduced me to the idea. Now I do it all the time.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 27, 2010 5:50 PM GMT
    Built_J saidPork: The Other White Meat


    I just found some Pork Tenderloins on sale at the market! I'm going to have a great dinner tonight!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 27, 2010 5:54 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said

    I never paid attention to those chickens rotating in those glass rotisseries in the supermarkets, until a BF introduced me to the idea. Now I do it all the time.


    Yes, the rotisserie chickens are a life & time saver!

    My mother gave me a home rotisserie for Christmas and I use it at least once a month. I normally receive free whole chickens from my high school (which is also a working farm) and those birds never go to waste.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 27, 2010 6:08 PM GMT
    GBRelentless said
    Art_Deco said

    I never paid attention to those chickens rotating in those glass rotisseries in the supermarkets, until a BF introduced me to the idea. Now I do it all the time.

    Yes, the rotisserie chickens are a life & time saver!

    My mother gave me a home rotisserie for Christmas and I use it at least once a month. I normally receive free whole chickens from my high school (which is also a working farm) and those birds never go to waste.

    Ah, then you already know, good. My own family had a large home rotisserie in the 1950s & 60s, used for chicken, turkey, ham, roast beef, lamb. Our smaller condo kitchen doesn't have the room for that now.

    And besides, I find the supermarkets do them so consistently well here, at such a good price, the convenience alone would justify buying them pre-cooked. But starting with a free HS chicken has got that beat!

    So what do your trainer & dietician think of rotisserie chicken for your protein? Better than breaded and fried chicken, I must assume.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 27, 2010 6:25 PM GMT
    Art_Deco said
    GBRelentless said
    Art_Deco said

    I never paid attention to those chickens rotating in those glass rotisseries in the supermarkets, until a BF introduced me to the idea. Now I do it all the time.

    Yes, the rotisserie chickens are a life & time saver!

    My mother gave me a home rotisserie for Christmas and I use it at least once a month. I normally receive free whole chickens from my high school (which is also a working farm) and those birds never go to waste.

    Ah, then you already know, good. My own family had a large home rotisserie in the 1950s & 60s, used for chicken, turkey, ham, roast beef, lamb. Our smaller condo kitchen doesn't have the room for that now.

    And besides, I find the supermarkets do them so consistently well here, at such a good price, the convenience alone would justify buying them pre-cooked. But starting with a free HS chicken has got that beat!

    So what do your trainer & dietician think of rotisserie chicken for your protein? Better than breaded and fried chicken, I must assume.


    They love the idea of rotisserie chicken. It's actually better, to me, than baked chicken because the fat drips off of the chicken onto the catch tray at the base of the machine.

    I typically eat a lot of chicken, however, Ive been told to monitor my intake because it is high in sodium (who knew?)