Time to learn to drive - simulator lessons effective?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 28, 2010 10:10 PM GMT
    Ok, since im 24 i figure its well overdue that i start to learn to drive. I havent learnt to drive before because of living in a city, being a student and low on cash put it at the bottom of my priorities. So now many things in my life are back in control i feel its about time i sorted this out. Now, Ive looked at lessons in my area an most lessons are around £25 ($3icon_cool.gif an hour, but my dad suggested simulator lessons that they do near me, where effectively you sit in a simulator (big surprise) and its supposed to be a good way of learning the early stages, plus its only £14 ($21) per hour.

    SO my question is whether anyone has done this before, and is it effective at speeding up the learning process?

    Ta
  • DrewT

    Posts: 1327

    Aug 29, 2010 1:46 AM GMT
    I'd go with the real thing. I learned to drive in about 2 hours or so. I learned to drive well through a lot of practice. icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 29, 2010 1:54 AM GMT
    I practically learned to fly using a flight sim. Considering the realism it has, it wouldn't surprise me if a driving sim would be just as effective.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 29, 2010 2:16 AM GMT
    . . . if you live anywhere near the countryside, you could learn a lot about driving at no cost by driving out there . . . I learned to drive on country roads, especially gravel roads, and the experience has proven to be invaluable . . . for example, if you can drive on gravel, you will be ok on snow/ice . . . there is not really a good alternative to actual driving experience . . .
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 29, 2010 4:32 AM GMT
    noren said . . . if you live anywhere near the countryside, you could learn a lot about driving at no cost by driving out there . . . I learned to drive on country roads, especially gravel roads, and the experience has proven to be invaluable . . . for example, if you can drive on gravel, you will be ok on snow/ice . . . there is not really a good alternative to actual driving experience . . .


    I agree, we did this as well, or on the ranch as kids would "drive" trucks or machinery. One of my first real lessons was on loose gravel, prepares you for a lot of adverse driving conditions.

    Why simulate when you can actually go do it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 29, 2010 4:58 AM GMT
    yeah dude, get a friend and go to a pk lot or out in the country where theres noone around... thats zero an hour and with a friend instead of some random
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Aug 29, 2010 5:06 AM GMT
    I have lived in cities most of my life as well, I know "how" to drive, it's the whole parking thing & practical stuff I have no experience in. I've never bothered to get my license for some of the same reasons you stated and have been practising myself. I like the simulator idea as well, but doubt there is anything similar near me.., Good luck mate
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Aug 29, 2010 6:44 AM GMT
    track_boi saidyeah dude, get a friend and go to a pk lot or out in the country where theres noone around... thats zero an hour and with a friend instead of some random


    I grew up on a dead-end road, and I learned to drive when I was 13 or 14. The basics you learn quickly, but becoming a good driver requires experience on the road.

    Are the lessons required, like they are in other European countries? If you have to do lessons or the simulator, go with the cheaper one. You aren't really going to learn anything more than stop, go, turn right, turn left in there. The rest will come on the wide open road!
  • trevchaser

    Posts: 237

    Sep 01, 2010 5:09 AM GMT
    Learning to drive is a life long practice. I've been driving for 15 years and still find little things that add to my experience over the years.

    I believe if you take driving lessons from a company who teaches, you would have no problem picking it up. All you need to learn is how to handle a vehicle and the rest of it is going to come from real life experiences. As your experience increases, you will learn how to predict what other drivers will do so you can take action.

    After you have been driving to a point where you feel confident with a vehicle in your hands, I'd suggest advance driver training. This is where the fun starts and more of your fears become answered. You learn how to control evasive maneuvers should you ever need to make them and learn how a vehicle reacts to every movement of your input.

    Don't worry too much! Just drive and get out there. Don't let your fears stop you from doing what others have proved works. Smile, relax, and have fun! icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 01, 2010 8:07 AM GMT
    I only finally got my license this year, after not bothering for a while, then taking some lessons, then having a big break from it.

    I do think the only way to learn is to get out there and practice. Book some lessons with an instructor and then practice as much as you can with a friend/family member.

    Learning to drive is really stressful and although a simulator might be good at picking up the basics, it can't adequately replicate what it's like being on the road with other drivers around. You should pick up the basics from your lessons and then you just continue to polish them until you're ready to fly solo!

    Good luck!