I have a healthy food question..

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 23, 2008 9:38 PM GMT
    Sometimes my schedule does not permit me the time to fix my eggs in the morning or prepare my dinner in the proper time needed before I head to bed.

    Soooooo...the question is this:

    Will baking my chicken, or cooking eggs then storing them in the fridge only to reheat them later, reduce the nutritional value?

    Enlighten meicon_smile.gif
  • Menergy_1

    Posts: 737

    Feb 23, 2008 11:11 PM GMT
    Basically, no.
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Feb 23, 2008 11:36 PM GMT
    How do you feel about hardboiled eggs?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 23, 2008 11:51 PM GMT
    i can do hard boiled eggs. I just prefer scrambled eggs or an omelet in the morningicon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 24, 2008 12:01 AM GMT
    I usually cook up a tone of food on the weekend and then portion it out and wrap it up and pop it into the freezer. It seems fresher tasting when it has been frozen. By the end of the week in the fridge it gets a bit old tasting... I assume if it tastes old then the nutrients are fading as well.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Feb 24, 2008 12:16 AM GMT
    I agree with Navy (aside from politics.lol). I think planning is the best. I'm trying to radically improve the quality of my food. Think and plan.. and don't leave it in there too long. I'd give it 24 hours, then trash it if you haven't eaten it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 24, 2008 12:21 AM GMT
    like my food Kansan, my politics are fresh! icon_lol.gif
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Feb 24, 2008 4:03 AM GMT
    Navy96 saidlike my food Kansan, my politics are fresh! icon_lol.gif


    I'm glad your food is fresh.. the politics is a little twisted... LOLicon_biggrin.gif
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Feb 24, 2008 12:13 PM GMT
    The refrigeration isn't what's going to determine the nutritional value...more it's the way you cooked it in the first place that does
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    Feb 24, 2008 12:39 PM GMT
    I do know that multiple reheatings can kill the nutrients. If you have a pot of chili or soup, only heat what you will be eating at that sitting, not the whole pot.

    Same with freezing. If it's been frozen before, don't freeze it again.
  • MikePhilPerez

    Posts: 4357

    Feb 24, 2008 1:21 PM GMT
    Guys, when you say reheating............How do you reheat, your food icon_question.gif

    I hope it's not the microwave.

    Also, did you know, that the nutrient value of tomatoes, is better when they are not kept in the fridge icon_question.gif

    Mike
  • Menergy_1

    Posts: 737

    Feb 24, 2008 2:05 PM GMT
    MikePhil saidGuys, when you say reheating............How do you reheat, your food icon_question.gif

    I hope it's not the microwave.

    Also, did you know, that the nutrient value of tomatoes, is better when they are not kept in the fridge icon_question.gif

    Mike


    There are many sources of good information on-line about nutrient preservation, healthy/safe storage practices, and fresh veggie/fruit and perishable foods guides to answer a lot of these questions.

    You're right about tomatoes and refrigeration, too - chilling them inhibits or destroys an enzyme contained in fresh tomatoes, affecting their taste and ripening.

    Microwaving has proponents and opponents, too -- some studies say a large amount of nutrients or healthy benefits in broccoli is lost in microwaving; other information says it's so much better to cook/steam in a microwave than in quarts of water which you pour down the drain. (Guess it doesn't matter if you don't like broccoli!)

    Maybe you can elaborate more on why you say "I hope it's not in the microwave."
  • MikePhilPerez

    Posts: 4357

    Feb 24, 2008 3:03 PM GMT
    AbFab1 said[quote][cite]MikePhil said[/cite]
    Microwaving has proponents and opponents, too -- some studies say a large amount of nutrients or healthy benefits in broccoli is lost in microwaving; other information says it's so much better to cook/steam in a microwave than in quarts of water which you pour down the drain. (Guess it doesn't matter if you don't like broccoli!)

    Maybe you can elaborate more on why you say "I hope it's not in the microwave."


    Food from a microwave, has no nutritional value. The microwave destroys everything. I was told this, by a alternative health professional, and when you think about it, it makes since.

    The food also tastes horrible from a microwave.

    Mike
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 24, 2008 4:41 PM GMT
    MikePhil said
    Food from a microwave, has no nutritional value. The microwave destroys everything. I was told this, by a alternative health professional, and when you think about it, it makes since.

    The food also tastes horrible from a microwave.

    Mike


    So last night, I took a thin piece of raw filet of sole and put it right on a plate. I drizzled with EVOO and lemon juice, sprinkled a tad of Old Bay and layered on some thin slices of tomatoes. I placed a bowl over the plate and zapped it in the micro for a one and a half minutes.

    So you're saying I might as well have eaten wadded up wet Kleenex?
  • Menergy_1

    Posts: 737

    Feb 24, 2008 4:53 PM GMT
    MikePhil said[quote]

    Food from a microwave, has no nutritional value. The microwave destroys everything. I was told this, by a alternative health professional, and when you think about it, it makes since.

    The food also tastes horrible from a microwave.

    Mike


    Point No. 1: I have to disagree, but my opinions are based on more "traditional" science/nutrition/dietary information. I understand how an "alternative health professional" might feel the way you've cited. And the food isn't "irradiated," with nuclear radiation or the like. The microwave energy yields a physical heating process.

    Point No. 2: Food you've eaten may taste horrible from a microwave; I've had some excellent foods prepared that way. It really depends on cooking appropriate foods in a microwave and how they're cooked, in my opinion. Certainly, some things should not be cooked this way; other methods yield much better results in lots of ways.
  • MikePhilPerez

    Posts: 4357

    Feb 24, 2008 8:43 PM GMT
    vtorso said[quote][cite]MikePhil said[/cite]
    Food from a microwave, has no nutritional value. The microwave destroys everything. I was told this, by a alternative health professional, and when you think about it, it makes since.

    The food also tastes horrible from a microwave.

    Mike


    So last night, I took a thin piece of raw filet of sole and put it right on a plate. I drizzled with EVOO and lemon juice, sprinkled a tad of Old Bay and layered on some thin slices of tomatoes. I placed a bowl over the plate and zapped it in the micro for a one and a half minutes.

    So you're saying I might as well have eaten wadded up wet Kleenex?[/quote]

    I'm afraid so.

    But look on the bright side, it probably tasted better than the Kleenex icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 24, 2008 8:54 PM GMT
    For one and a half minutes.. I don't think you'll lose every nutrient in the fish. What a kitchen microwave does is send out infrared rays directed into the microwave chamber. What these rays do is cause existing water molecules to vibrate faster, in turn transferring energy to them. This positive increase in energy causes the water molecules to heat up, and the resulting heat causes the rest of the food/plate to heat up as well.

    These infrared red rays do not destroy nutrients per say. What they simply do is energize the hydrogen bonds of molecules. The danger lies in overheating the food, in which case the infrared rays cause the hydrogen bonds to vibrate past their threshold of bonding, and subsequently the bonds break and the nutrient breaks down. Some nutrients are quite sensitive to this and that may be the case you can make.
  • MikePhilPerez

    Posts: 4357

    Feb 24, 2008 9:16 PM GMT
    AbFab1 said[quote][cite]MikePhil said[/cite][quote]

    Food from a microwave, has no nutritional value. The microwave destroys everything. I was told this, by a alternative health professional, and when you think about it, it makes since.

    The food also tastes horrible from a microwave.

    Mike


    Point No. 1: I have to disagree, but my opinions are based on more "traditional" science/nutrition/dietary information. I understand how an "alternative health professional" might feel the way you've cited. And the food isn't "irradiated," with nuclear radiation or the like. The microwave energy yields a physical heating process.

    Point No. 2: Food you've eaten may taste horrible from a microwave; I've had some excellent foods prepared that way. It really depends on cooking appropriate foods in a microwave and how they're cooked, in my opinion. Certainly, some things should not be cooked this way; other methods yield much better results in lots of ways.[/quote]

    I'm no expert, so my opinion is based on what I have been told and what I have read, and common sense, and on the taste of the food. I can tell, what is reheated in a microwave, and what is not, by taste alone. It's just unnatural.

    If you value your health, think twice before using that microwave.

    MICROWAVE COOKING
    is Killing You!

    By Stephanie Relfe B.Sc. (Sydney)


    Microwave cooking is one of the most important causes of ill health. It is certainly one of the most ignored.

    There was a lawsuit in 1991 in Oklahoma. A woman named Norma Levitt had hip surgery, but was killed by a simple blood transfusion when a nurse "warmed the blood for the transfusion in a microwave oven!"

    Logic suggests that if heating is all there is to microwave cooking, then it doesn't matter how something is heated. Blood for transfusions is routinely warmed, but not in microwave ovens. Does it not therefore follow that microwaving cooking does something quite different?

    http://www.relfe.com/microwave.html
  • Menergy_1

    Posts: 737

    Feb 24, 2008 9:41 PM GMT
    One thing that comes to my mind: if someone microwaves human blood, there may well be bursting of corpuscles and perhaps cell wall damage in that blood, and perhaps harm to certain ingredients/composition of blood, for example. I'm not medically trained, so I can only imagine "damaged" blood should not be used in a blood transfusion. That certainly does not lead me to believe that food I've eaten that has been cooked/heated/reheated by halogen/microwaves/or plain old fire is dangerous (except the reports of charred foods perhaps being carcinogenic).

    I'm not disputing your taste buds and experiences with "reheated" foods, and how you view the cooking process or the outcome.

  • MikePhilPerez

    Posts: 4357

    Feb 24, 2008 10:26 PM GMT
    My taste buds never lie. You should take my taste buds as evidence, that microwaved food, is not good for you. If your taste buds say, there is something wrong, then there is. That's why God gave you the sense of taste.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 24, 2008 10:46 PM GMT
    MikePhil saidMICROWAVE COOKING
    is Killing You!

    By Stephanie Relfe B.Sc. (Sydney)


    Just want to point out that that Relfe's academic qualifications are a bachelor's degree. Who the hell has a bachelor's degree and puts B.Sc. after their name?

    As I am Munching Zombie B.A. I am not qualified to go any further.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 25, 2008 12:29 AM GMT
    relokou saidFor one and a half minutes.. I don't think you'll lose every nutrient in the fish. What a kitchen microwave does is send out infrared rays directed into the microwave chamber. What these rays do is cause existing water molecules to vibrate faster, in turn transferring energy to them. This positive increase in energy causes the water molecules to heat up, and the resulting heat causes the rest of the food/plate to heat up as well.

    These infrared red rays do not destroy nutrients per say. What they simply do is energize the hydrogen bonds of molecules. The danger lies in overheating the food, in which case the infrared rays cause the hydrogen bonds to vibrate past their threshold of bonding, and subsequently the bonds break and the nutrient breaks down. Some nutrients are quite sensitive to this and that may be the case you can make.


    Thanks for the explanation. Also good to know I didn't waste my time completely. It still tasted great.

    But in any case, relokou, I'm going to start eating what you're eating. You look great. icon_cool.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 25, 2008 12:34 AM GMT
    AbFab1 saidI'm not medically trained, so I can only imagine "damaged" blood should not be used in a blood transfusion.


    Really. What medical professional would "cook" human blood and then transfuse it into someone. And we are talking about cooking here, not medical procedures. I don't think this blood incident has any relevance to food preparation.
  • Menergy_1

    Posts: 737

    Feb 25, 2008 3:43 AM GMT
    [quote][cite]relokou said What a kitchen microwave does is send out infrared rays directed into the microwave chamber. What these rays do is cause existing water molecules to vibrate faster, in turn transferring energy to them. This positive increase in energy causes the water molecules to heat up, and the resulting heat causes the rest of the food/plate to heat up as well.

    These infrared red rays do not destroy nutrients per say. What they simply do is energize the hydrogen bonds of molecules. The danger lies in overheating the food, in which case the infrared rays cause the hydrogen bonds to vibrate past their threshold of bonding, and subsequently the bonds break and the nutrient breaks down. Some nutrients are quite sensitive to this and that may be the case you can make. [/quote]

    I just want to make a point of clarification about the microwave energy:

    Actually the microwaves are not infrared, but in the range between radio frequency and infrared radiation:

    Microwaves are a form of "electromagnetic" radiation; that is, they are waves of electrical and magnetic energy moving together through space. Electromagnetic radiation ranges from the energetic x-rays to the less energetic radio frequency waves used in broadcasting. Microwaves fall into the radio frequency band of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation. Microwaves should not be confused with x-rays, which are more powerful.

    There are annotated published reports from both sides of the fence - natural foods and alternative standpoints vs. mainstream research. Some "results" seem anecdotal at best, some questions do remain about degrading nutrients on many foods not tested.

    It's up to the individual to make his/her choices and conclusions and act accordingly.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 25, 2008 3:46 AM GMT
    I like to nuke my kitchen sponges in the micro...it kills the odor in them! icon_cool.gif