DO ANIMALS HAVE FEELINGS?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 02, 2010 5:11 PM GMT
    Well, of course they do. I wanted to share this AMAZING story I heard on a radiolab podcast that talks about what a whale did after it was rescued. The podcast, entitled "Animal Minds," talks about much more, but if you don't have time, this one segment from it is very moving.

    The whale story runs from 4:50-14:10.

    http://www.radiolab.org/2010/jan/11/

    My attempt to embed as well:


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    Sep 02, 2010 10:02 PM GMT
    My Doberman is good friends with a Greyhound who lives a few blocks away. The Greyhound had to get a leg amputated a few weeks ago because of cancer. Yesterday was the first time her owner took her on longer walks. She pulled her owner to my house, and she stood outside the front door and cried. My dog saw her through the window, and he started crying. We got them together, and they both whimpered for several minutes.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Sep 02, 2010 10:14 PM GMT
    2ir2d8y.jpg
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Sep 03, 2010 1:16 AM GMT
    Webster666 said2ir2d8y.jpg


    awwwwwww
  • BardBear

    Posts: 533

    Sep 03, 2010 1:21 AM GMT
    Animals are a very varied lot, but recent research on animals has proven that, yes, many are emotional creatures. The one I remember was that dogs were sympathetic to their owners. When their owners would yawn--they would yawn. But not in a mimic way--but it meant that they had seen the action feel similar by understanding.

    So in the dog department? I'm thinking yes. Very much so. My dog is a rebunctious corgi--but we live near several seniors and when she sees them, she runs--but doesn't jump, sometimes lying on the pavement before them.

    Elephants create graveyards and then cry and mourn.

    I can go on and on. I think the bigger, more appropriate question? Why do humans not seem to use the emotions they have?

    Peace,
    Bardy.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 03, 2010 1:21 AM GMT
    They do. Specially dogs:

    Hunger
    boredom
    loneliness
    jealousy
    apathy
    empathy
    etc
  • DrewT

    Posts: 1327

    Sep 03, 2010 1:24 AM GMT
    BardBear saidI can go on and on. I think the bigger, more appropriate question? Why do humans not seem to use the emotions they have?


    Because Western culture tells us emotions are 'bad' and not fully up to par with 'reason' and 'logic.' It is not reasonable to mourn, it doesn't do any good. It's not reasonable to help others unless you get something out of it.

    I think we are robbing ourself of our emotional heritage, and it is truly sad.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Sep 03, 2010 1:24 AM GMT
    BardBear saidAnimals are a very varied lot, but recent research on animals has proven that, yes, many are emotional creatures. The one I remember was that dogs were sympathetic to their owners. When their owners would yawn--they would yawn. But not in a mimic way--but it meant that they had seen the action feel similar by understanding.

    So in the dog department? I'm thinking yes. Very much so. My dog is a rebunctious corgi--but we live near several seniors and when she sees them, she runs--but doesn't jump, sometimes lying on the pavement before them.

    Elephants create graveyards and then cry and mourn.

    I can go on and on. I think the bigger, more appropriate question? Why do humans not seem to use the emotions they have?

    Peace,
    Bardy.


    Elephants don't create graveyards... sorry... its just a legend that has been popularized by media and films..

    But yes.. I do believe some animals can have some sort of limited emotion
  • metta

    Posts: 39107

    Sep 03, 2010 1:25 AM GMT