Tabouleh

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 05, 2010 11:40 AM GMT
    Who here has had tabouleh and do you have your own recipe for it? I've just started making it and its one of the few foods I could eat everyday and not get tired of. icon_cool.gif


    For those wondering what it is:
    "Tabbouleh (Arabic: تبولة‎; also tabouleh or tab(b)ouli) is a Middle Eastern salad of bulgur, finely chopped parsley and mint, tomato and spring onion, seasoned with lemon juice and olive oil" ~ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tabbouleh

    TABOULEH_4b068b08b4d1a.jpgimg>

    Carbs and Fiber in Tabouleh

    Food Item: Tabouleh
    Food Quantity: 1 tbsp
    Carbs: 6g
    Dietary Fiber: 1g
    Net Carbs: 5g
    Tabouleh and Carbs

    Grains and oats (like Tabouleh), have a high carb count but a lower "net carb" or "digestible carb" content. They contain several vitamins and minerals. Grains and oats are often a good source of dietary fiber, which has a number of health benefits. For example, fiber helps protect against digestive disorders and disease. Healthy low carb diet plans typically recommend grains and oats in later phases of the eating plan, when you are permitted more carbs - although whole grain varieties are preferred.

    For more details about carbs in grains and oats, see below.
    Tabouleh and Glycemic Index

    Oats and grains which are higher in insoluble fiber content (mainly cellulose) are digested more slowly, and are thus lower on the glycemic index, which helps to maintain more stable blood glucose levels and healthier glucose metabolism. Eating more fiber helps to reduce the effect of high glycemic index foods by lowering the glycemic value of meals.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 05, 2010 5:09 PM GMT
    It should be noted that Middle Eastern Tabbouli differs vastly from North African. Also, my secret is to add a seedless cucumber (preferably a Lebanese cucumber found at seasonal veggie vendors). It will change your world.
  • ATLANTIS7

    Posts: 1213

    Sep 05, 2010 6:15 PM GMT
    Love it !!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 05, 2010 8:23 PM GMT
    Pinny saidIt should be noted that Middle Eastern Tabbouli differs vastly from North African. Also, my secret is to add a seedless cucumber (preferably a Lebanese cucumber found at seasonal veggie vendors). It will change your world.


    I'm going to have to try that next time i make it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 06, 2010 3:50 PM GMT
    I LOVE tabouleh!

    *drools embarrassingly*

    -Doug
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 06, 2010 4:21 PM GMT
    I love tabouleh too... used to get it in my favorite Syrian restaurant in Cyprus.
    icon_sad.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 06, 2010 4:24 PM GMT
    I also love tabouleh, and agree that adding a bit of seedless cucumber and sea salt makes it truly heavenly.

    However, like a sauce made chiefly with cilantro, a salad made chiefly with parsley is not to everyone's taste. it is definitely piquant.

    I love it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 06, 2010 9:54 PM GMT
    One tablespoon serving???? I can eat a bowl of the stuff!!!! icon_lol.gif

    Tabouleh is also healthy for all the reasons associated with eating parsley and mint. These "herbs" are jam packed full of nutrients and are green green green!!
    Selenium is a big plus from all the parsley.

    The "recipe" is basic. And, I tend to work by "eye" on salads such as this.
    Here are some of my own thoughts on guidelines:
    This is a dish that (in my opinion) is best with "less" number of ingredients than more. In other words, I don't go adding a bunch of extra stuff that is not really part of the basics.
    The exception is that to the olive oil, I may add just a touch of tahini to it as a warm and nutty background hint, but don't over do it.
    I may cook the bulgar in vegetable broth, and will add a touch of sea salt while cooking. I do not salt the salad itself.
    Generally, I go a bit more overboard on the proportion of parsley to the rest of the ingredients, but still maintaining the "look" of a balanced recipe.
    Generally, I go real easy on the onion (but that's my personal taste. I like to speak "sweetly".)
    Adjust lemon, and amount of fresh mint to a balanced taste.