Future hiring will mainly benefit the high-skilled

  • metta

    Posts: 39107

    Sep 06, 2010 9:02 AM GMT
    Future hiring will mainly benefit the high-skilled

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100905/ap_on_bi_ge/us_employment_future_jobs
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    Sep 06, 2010 4:28 PM GMT
    Be nice to know what they define as "high-skilled"! Apparently having an MBA, management experience with a Fortune 50 company, experience in a start-up and running one's own business does not seem to fit the definition if my job search is any indication!
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    Sep 06, 2010 5:05 PM GMT
    Going for my Bachelors in Computer Engineering and maybe Graduate school in the same field so that sounds good to me icon_biggrin.gif
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    Sep 06, 2010 5:56 PM GMT
    That's funny. I saw a news blurb on Yahoo the other day saying that skilled blue collar jobs will be in demand. So I'm in a dilemma here.. Should I go back to school for my business MBA? Or should I go back to school to learn welding? icon_lol.gificon_rolleyes.gif
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    Sep 06, 2010 6:37 PM GMT
    It failed to mention the fact that most of those business owners probably never even went to college. Instead, they just have good business and networking skills. That's what it takes to succeed financially. Technical skills only keep you dependent on others for income.

    BTW, I'm still learning business skills...maybe eventually I'll be financially stable without having to rely on a regular job. icon_lol.gif
  • neosyllogy

    Posts: 1714

    Sep 06, 2010 7:41 PM GMT
    Shortnsexystud saidBe nice to know what they define as "high-skilled"! Apparently having an MBA, management experience with a Fortune 50 company, experience in a start-up and running one's own business does not seem to fit the definition if my job search is any indication!


    He did say future hiring. So maybe you just have to wait it out.
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    Sep 06, 2010 8:08 PM GMT
    neosyllogy said
    Shortnsexystud saidBe nice to know what they define as "high-skilled"! Apparently having an MBA, management experience with a Fortune 50 company, experience in a start-up and running one's own business does not seem to fit the definition if my job search is any indication!


    He did say future hiring. So maybe you just have to wait it out.


    I think what they are saying is related to skills as opposed to service.
    One thing that brought the economy down was a lack of manufacturing and innovation (i.e science and engineers) and an expansion of service related occupations that simply required charm and hard work. (i.e. mortgage loan originators)
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    Sep 06, 2010 9:09 PM GMT
    I think I picked an amazing career based on this articleicon_smile.gif
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    Sep 08, 2010 3:49 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidTechnical skills only keep you dependent on others for income.


    Any job that generates traditional income (money) keeps you dependent on others. I could run my own web design business from a secluded area out in the mountains, living off the grid, but I'd still be dependent on clients for income. Same as any other job. If you decided to generate your own electricity, food, potable water, etc, then you would be highly less dependent on others, but you wouldn't exactly need an 'income' at that point. So to take out the bias in your statement away from the technically skilled, to earn an income, you are dependent on others.