Community Gardening: Do you have it, if so does it work?

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    Sep 12, 2010 1:41 AM GMT
    I am doing a project here in the community, where i would like to have community gardening in my area. However, most in my city do not like or do not know how to do it. Does your city or wherever you live have a community garden, or do you garden? How would you promote it? Any tips?
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    Sep 12, 2010 6:24 AM GMT
    I have always been a avid gardener & plant lover. I was also a member of a community garden in San Francisco for four years; served on the coard for two of those. Generally, what you need to start with is a small lot, trackt of land, or some loving soul with a little city property, with which to actually grow things.
    After you have that, community member who will assist is imperitive, as well as deciding what you want to grow vs what you can grow in your climate.
    -There is so much that can be said for this topic, but researching on the net is a great resourse for community gardeners at all stages! Look up:

    Guerrillagardening.org & Communitygarden.org
    that should give you a great jumping off point!
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    Sep 12, 2010 7:16 AM GMT
    I'm an avid gardener, with a large vegetable garden and multiple perennial flower beds around the yard. Great way to work away stress, not to mention put a lot of good food away for the winter.

    As far as community gardens here in Fairbanks go, there are two large parcels that accommodate a large community of gardeners. One program is run through the borough Parks and Recreation dept. They are quite active and have a long waiting list for parcels.

    There are also several subscription farms in the local area, where you join, pay a certain amount and receive a box of veggies each week all through the growing season.

    One farm in particular sponsors educational workshops and community get-togethers to spread the word. They also offer farm/co-op internships. You can check them out at http://www.calypsofarm.org for some information on their operation. They are an incredible group of people.

    I wish you luck. People have forgotten where their food comes from.icon_eek.gif
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    Sep 12, 2010 7:20 AM GMT
    Another idea would be to work with any youth groups, either through local schools or community service organizations that would get teens involved in the process of growing food for themselves, their schools, or even for donation to local food banks or senior centers.
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    Sep 12, 2010 3:56 PM GMT
    @lostcreek99 The good thing is that it is at the Jr college where i will be promoting it at first. The thing is that El Paso, like Phoenix is a desert like place and well hardly anything grows due to the hardships of the desert, hot, dry, cold climate and little rain :-s however, what i want to do is to get people to be educated on how to and why it is important to garden. So therefore, it would be a small start and well with help of students it will be easier.
    @eccentricstud how did you promote it in San Francisco? or was it already up and running?
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    Sep 12, 2010 4:13 PM GMT
    I'm sure there would be either a local USDA extension office or a local group of master gardeners that you would talk to for assistance on what/how to grow in your area.

    A lot of my family lives in West Texas and deal with the hot/cold extreme heat and dry conditions using row covers, shade cloth and other techniques. The real hard part is controlling pests without resorting to napalm and DDT.
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    Sep 12, 2010 4:21 PM GMT
    @lostcreek99 actually it is more of local individual gardners here in EP
  • metta

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    Sep 12, 2010 4:31 PM GMT
    I have not done it but I have neighbors that do it and absolutely love it.


    CSA - Community Supported Agriculture Group.


    http://www.localharvest.org

    http://find.mapmuse.com/interest/csa

    http://www.nal.usda.gov/afsic/pubs/csa/csa.shtml

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Community-supported_agriculture

    Getting Started:
    http://www.lifestylermag.com/features/getting-started-with-community-supported-agriculture
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    Sep 12, 2010 4:40 PM GMT
    There was a story in the NYT this morning about how there are so many stalled developments in cities around the country that there are big lots sitting vacant for years at a time.

    Seems like some of those developers ought to be receptive to groups that would offer to green-up those lots while they're waiting for financing or whatever. Good PR and might get the local pols off their back a bit.
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    Sep 12, 2010 4:46 PM GMT
    Nice, well some of those lots are government owned. Here specially since we have a base in the middle of the city :-s
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    Sep 12, 2010 7:28 PM GMT
    I haven't managed completing a community garden (yet) but know lots of people that have done them in Los Angeles and I'm doing similar greening projects in South L.A. (one of the poorest areas in Los Angeles).

    In my experience, it's been easier to do community gardens on land that is owned by the local government, meaning the city or the county, because if you choose a site that is owned by a private entity sometimes they wanna make $$ off of you ... but it all depends, because dealing with the city sometimes takes some time if your local govt. body is too bureaucratic ... but sometimes you can speed things along if you apply grassroots pressure like if you're organized and have people behind you (the community) ... specially if you do community-organizing type activities to generate support for the garden the process becomes much more rewarding and once everyone is on board it's a REALLY cool experience.

    Grimaldi01 saidNice, well some of those lots are government owned. Here specially since we have a base in the middle of the city :-s
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    Sep 14, 2010 6:18 PM GMT
    Govt meaning U.S. gov't :s
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    Sep 15, 2010 3:57 AM GMT
    federally owned? oh wow yeah that definitely makes it more complicated ...

    Grimaldi01 saidGovt meaning U.S. gov't :s
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    Sep 17, 2010 11:17 PM GMT
    @reg825 yes most of the land is owned by the military, anyways, today we began and we planted some simple veggies. I am going to add the mycorrhizae on monday or tuesday to help them grow. The plot of land was really really bad. Had to put a lot of organic compost and organic fertilizer and loads of water hopefully it grows icon_smile.gif Most importantly i am psyched about adding and working with the mycorrhizae icon_smile.gif I got covered in mud and well all the stuff we put in, not drenched in it but i have some spots of mud lol i love working in the garden. Plus i was awesome with the pic! I have some photos i'll upload later on icon_smile.gif send blessings plz!
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    Sep 17, 2010 11:52 PM GMT
    I only know about this from Will & Grace... Remember when Grace broke the gnome?
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    Sep 17, 2010 11:57 PM GMT
    hahaha yes and they were all freaked out about it lol
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    Sep 18, 2010 12:06 AM GMT
    A friend of mine I worked with at city council created a sponsorship program between urban agriculture and community garden groups where by the city leased city-owned vacant lots to neighborhood organizations. It is really a win-win for everyone. There is one less blighted and neglected lot in the neighborhood from which members can enjoy a mini park or produce and the city has one less lot to maintain.