Women (in the media) in a men's locker room??

  • Razzmaniac

    Posts: 240

    Sep 14, 2010 12:16 PM GMT
    Most of us here play sports and know that hormones and things rage after athletic activity. WHY is it allowed for women to interview players in the mens locker room?? I am not defending the NY Jets action or at all going to defend ther Mexican reporter, but we are still animals by nature and it's a MEN'S locker room. Why can't they I interview in a waiting room or hallway?? You would never see a male reporter in a womens locker room.
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    Sep 14, 2010 12:38 PM GMT
    Razzmaniac saidWhy can't they I interview in a waiting room or hallway??

    The interview CAN be in an area outside the locker room, if the team chooses, or if an individual player wants his interview conducted elsewhere. In fact, some teams have designated rooms expressly for this purpose.

    The original US court decisions that allowed women into sports locker rooms applied to cases where male reporters were also allowed inside. The courts decided that barring women reporters but not men was discriminatory, and harmful to their careers.

    If the team doesn't want women inside, then NO reporters are supposed to be allowed inside the locker room. Interviews are simply conducted outside for all reporters. A female reporter does not have automatic entry rights on her own -- her access is determined by whether male reporters are also not barred from going inside.

    In actual practice most US teams do allow reporters into the locker room, and so women with valid press credentials must be included if they wish. Most professional players seem cool with that.

    I don't know the custom in other countries, but I suspect many would allow women inside, since few are as prudish as the US. I remember when living in Germany I attended a field & track meet, and the ground-level clubhouse locker room was right next to the outdoor track. The door was left open, and spectators of both genders got a clear view of the athletes walking around totally naked inside.

    And after one of the races a runner stripped off his tank top and shorts, standing in the infield in nothing but a micro-bikini while he cooled off. Living in the US we don't realize how sexually repressed & puritanical we appear to the rest of the world.
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    Sep 14, 2010 1:50 PM GMT
    Lots of opinions on this, but frankly I wouldn't care. Just hope she's cool with seeing my cock and balls because I'm certainly not going to cover up for her.



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    Sep 14, 2010 3:03 PM GMT
    because both genders are equal but one gender is more equal than the other.

    you can put up photography of naked women on deviantart or the like and it's 'art' but if you put up a photo of a naked man it's deleted immediately and termed 'pornography'

    our culture sees women as sex objects and men as ugly pigs, so it makes a double standard. there were/are cultures that see men as sex objects. i think, when enforcement/creation of the rules are governed by ppl influenced by these cultural views, that it can never be truly equal because we are all biased. it's only ppl that have a different bias that can see it or care that it's all backwards and hypocritical.
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    Sep 14, 2010 3:13 PM GMT
    I was a little puzzled too ... I didn't even know that women reporters were allowed into men's locker rooms. The report I read didn't mention specifically what kinds of things the players were saying or doing to her ... I'd just be curious to hear exactly what was said or done. Also, was this the first time something like this has happened with this particular team? Or the first time someone publicized it or reported it?
  • Razzmaniac

    Posts: 240

    Sep 15, 2010 6:39 PM GMT
    Art Deco: ya we are kinda prudish. Sexuality is made to be such an issue and a sensitive one at that. Love how Europe sees it more openly. We can even see that in their commercials.
  • dhinkansas

    Posts: 764

    Sep 15, 2010 7:25 PM GMT
    No reporter, regardless of gender, should be in a locker room after the game. That's for the coaches and players to change and decompress. I hate any reporter shoving a micophone in a player's face as soon as they get in the locker-room, asking "Why Chad, you struck out with the bases loaded to end the game. How are you feeling right now?"

    There's plenty of time after players change.

    The double standard can work both ways. You don't see Kirk Herbsteit in the US Lady Soccer Teams shower after a match.
  • Delivis

    Posts: 2332

    Sep 15, 2010 7:27 PM GMT
    Who cares? So long as it's fair - let in both or none.
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    Sep 15, 2010 7:46 PM GMT
    dhinkansas saidNo reporter, regardless of gender, should be in a locker room after the game. That's for the coaches and players to change and decompress. I hate any reporter shoving a micophone in a player's face as soon as they get in the locker-room, asking "Why Chad, you struck out with the bases loaded to end the game. How are you feeling right now?"

    There's plenty of time after players change.

    The double standard can work both ways. You don't see Kirk Herbsteit in the US Lady Soccer Teams shower after a match.


    Totally agree. During my H20-polo playing years, my teammates and I gave interviews before or after we got showered and dressed - outside the locker room. Would you want reporters standing there with microphones and cameras two feet from you while you are buck naked? (I might like to blow my nose after a shower, or floss, maybe put on some deodorant at my locker - maybe have a few minutes to myself). Can't athletes have five minutes to dry off and put some clothes on? What is the urgency? Can't those questions wait five minutes?
  • Delivis

    Posts: 2332

    Sep 15, 2010 7:48 PM GMT
    Jockbod48 said
    dhinkansas saidNo reporter, regardless of gender, should be in a locker room after the game. That's for the coaches and players to change and decompress. I hate any reporter shoving a micophone in a player's face as soon as they get in the locker-room, asking "Why Chad, you struck out with the bases loaded to end the game. How are you feeling right now?"

    There's plenty of time after players change.

    The double standard can work both ways. You don't see Kirk Herbsteit in the US Lady Soccer Teams shower after a match.


    Totally agree. During my H20-polo playing years, my teammates and I gave interviews before or after we got showered and dressed - outside the locker room. Would you want reporters standing there with microphones and cameras two feet from you while you are standing there buck naked? (I might like to blow my nose after a shower, or floss, maybe put on some deodorant at my locker - maybe have a few minutes to myself). Can't athletes have five minutes to dry off and put some clothes on? What is the urgency? Can't those questions wait five minutes?


    I dont watch sports much at all, but from the little I have seen from after-game player interviews, the responses given are usually so short, uninformative, and banal, that I wonder why they ask them questions to begin with anyway..icon_smile.gif
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    Sep 15, 2010 7:54 PM GMT
    dhinkansas saidNo reporter, regardless of gender, should be in a locker room after the game. That's for the coaches and players to change and decompress. I hate any reporter shoving a micophone in a player's face as soon as they get in the locker-room, asking "Why Chad, you struck out with the bases loaded to end the game. How are you feeling right now?"

    There's plenty of time after players change.

    The double standard can work both ways. You don't see Kirk Herbsteit in the US Lady Soccer Teams shower after a match.

    That's a team decision, that ideally the players get to influence. If the team doesn't want reporters in the locker room after a game, then there are no reporters in the locker room. It's a private space, and reporters can't barge in unless they are allowed. And once they are allowed, reporters of both genders must be admitted, per US court rulings.

    As for women's sports, I honestly don't know if these court rulings have relevance in a women's locker room. I can't ever recall seeing reportage from a female locker room, even by female reporters. Therefore, this may be a moot point.

    Still, if female reporters were allowed into a women's locker room, you would think that male reporters should be, too. I just don't know. But the general lack of interest in the US in women's sports may be the real reason here.

    I mean, who really cares about female athletes? Not much in the US, except for a few tennis players. And who ever interviews any tennis players, man or woman, in a locker room? That's a team thing.

    And what female sports teams ever get a lot of interest in the US? Zilch. Maybe the Olympics every few years, but even then not a lot. And the Olympics are more strictly controlled regarding press access. I can't think of any female professional teams in the US that really generate a lot of excitement, that reporters would go into their locker rooms if they could.

    So this is not a valid comparison.
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    Sep 15, 2010 7:55 PM GMT
    I think Clinton Portis' comments were right on the mark!!! I loved it!

    Men are NOT allowed in women's locker rooms, so women should not be allowed in men's.

    Would love to see someone push the WNBA, LPGA and WTA on this...

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    Sep 15, 2010 9:14 PM GMT
    they shouldnt be in there and therefore should have no basis for complaints. Especially when the female reporter's title is correspondent/model - which implies that she is hired for her looks and can be fired for the same reason. Waitresses in vegas are the same way.


    So when are the male reporters allowed in the female lockerrooms? if any guys actually cover the WMBA for example, hahaha


    funny that no guys have ever tried to sue or whatnot for their junk appearing on tv with out their knowledge or financial compensation for full frontal,
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    Sep 15, 2010 9:25 PM GMT
    This is an OLD issue.. has been thrown about for years. They DID try to ban women from locker rooms..and they threw a big stink about it, saying it was sexually biased and they were being discriminated against.
    I think it's stupid to have ANY interviews in the locker room...unless, of course, they are catching guys as they come out of the shower...but that's a different issue altogether...LOL
    Hey, it's what the viewers want...and it sells. So, don't plan on it stopping anytime in the near future.
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    Sep 15, 2010 9:29 PM GMT
    In the UK you never see interviews held in the changing room, men or women. What a peculiar idea. What's wrong with having a specially designated interview room?
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19119

    Sep 15, 2010 9:44 PM GMT
    I agree that no reporters should be allowed in the locker room after the game...give the athletes some time to decompress and clean up. It's especially ridiculous to have a female reporter in there -- just seems to be asking for trouble. I don't know of many male reporters who are ever allowed in the female locker room...and understandably so. It's just inappropriate and not necessary.
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    Sep 15, 2010 10:57 PM GMT
    No one sees the irony in this?
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    Sep 16, 2010 12:12 AM GMT
    blackhawksfan saidI think Clinton Portis' comments were right on the mark!!! I loved it!

    Men are NOT allowed in women's locker rooms, so women should not be allowed in men's.

    Would love to see someone push the WNBA, LPGA and WTA on this...

    I am astonished that some of you guys continue to totally miss the point. It isn't that women are allowed into men's locker rooms, while men aren't allowed into women's locker rooms. Please read what I wrote above.

    The issue in the US is whether ANY reporters are allowed into the locker room, male or female, which is a choice made by the sports teams. If you allow ANY reporters into a locker room, then you can't discriminate against either gender, and BOTH must have access with proper press credentials.

    If you don't want reporters of one gender in the locker room, then NO reporters may be in the locker room. So you conduct interviews outside the locker room, for which some teams have provided specially designated rooms.

    The teams themselves control this issue, not female reporters. Reporters are reporters, and if you let them inside the locker room, some will be females. If you don't want females in there, then don't admit reporters. Simple.