Earthquakes

  • MikePhilPerez

    Posts: 4357

    Feb 27, 2008 11:58 PM GMT
    There was an earthquake in the UK this morning, at 1 am. I had just gone to bed, and I felt my bed move.

    Was it the earthquake?

    Would it be possible for me to feel that quake here in the west of Ireland?

    I'm convinced it was the quake.

    Mike
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    Feb 28, 2008 2:22 AM GMT
    No i don;t think so

    I was up talking to carl on the cam and he is in the uk and he felt it, but we ware too far form the epicentre.

    I think....check the bbc website

    The furtest it seemed to get was County Down, and up into Scotland, i suppose it all depends on the geological make up off your area, is it the right material to propogate a wave of that intensity, after moving across the irish sea, i never heard any reports of people feeling it in Dublin and are you out isolated where you live?

    I certainly didn't feel it here in Galway and i was talking to him before during and after it happened for a good while.


    But my geology only extends to 1st and 2nd year college, so i'm not an expert.
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    Feb 28, 2008 3:27 AM GMT
    take a gander at this site:

    http://earthquake.usgs.gov/

    it might shed some light on your shakes
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    Feb 28, 2008 3:29 AM GMT
    Are the islands of UK and Ireland on the same plate? They are islands right?
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    Feb 28, 2008 4:37 AM GMT
    When I was living in New York, there was an earthquake whose epicenter was in Montreal. I didn't feel a thing, as it was three a.m., and I didn't even wake up. But my then-boyfriend woke up and said he could feel the earth move (sorry, I had to). Of course, he was a light sleeper. And light-fingered, but that's another story, as they say.
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    Feb 28, 2008 7:35 AM GMT
    I thought there was an earthquake here in Chicago a while back, but in retrospect, I think it was just the fat couple fucking upstairs.
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    Feb 28, 2008 8:13 AM GMT
    If there's one thing I'm terrified of, it's earthquakes. icon_confused.gif

    We have had several since the Philippines is sitting right on top of the deepest trench in the ring of fire. icon_neutral.gif

    I probably would die of paranoia in Cali. LOL
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Feb 28, 2008 8:18 AM GMT
    I've always said, at least in Kansas we don't have Earthquakes and with the tornadoes, at least we get warnings and can seek shelter.
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    Feb 28, 2008 8:19 AM GMT
    See thaa's why i love where i live. No earthquakes, gay marriage, no tornados, aliitle snow but i love snow anyways.icon_razz.gif
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    Feb 28, 2008 11:02 AM GMT
    Ummm... HndsmKansan and Alexander89... I don't mean to rock your worlds or anything, but both of your states have a history of seismic activity. In fact, there aren't many states that don't. If either of you are like me, you tend to think they don't happen where you live because you don't feel them or hear about them. Many of these faults have only produced the rare, low magnitude quake now and then in our lifetimes and some have been inactive, but that's no guarantee they won't become more active or produce more intense quakes.

    If you're curious about your state's history of earthquakes, where the faults are, recent quakes, and the potential for seismicity, check out this link:

    http://earthquake.usgs.gov/regional/states/

    Also, HndsmKansan... for you, RBY71 and I, because of our proximities to the New Madrid zone, the type of earth in the region and its ability to transmit the energy of quakes... if there's another round of activity on the New Madrid of similar or greater intensity to the events of 1812 (8.0+), it is highly possible that we may not only feel the quake, but could be in the "moderate to heavy" damage zone. At least, that's what I'm hearing from various seismologists who I've heard speaking about New Madrid lately.
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    Feb 28, 2008 12:01 PM GMT
    Magnitude 4.7 ENGLAND, UNITED KINGDOM
    Wednesday, February 27, 2008 at 00:56:45 UTC

    Preliminary Earthquake Report

    Magnitude 4.7
    # Date-Time Wednesday, February 27, 2008 at 00:56:45 (UTC) - Coordinated Universal Time
    # Wednesday, February 27, 2008 at 12:56:45 AM local time at epicenter

    Time of Earthquake in other Time Zones
    Location 53.32N 0.31W
    Depth 10.0 kilometers
    Region ENGLAND, UNITED KINGDOM
    Distances 50 km (30 miles) S of Kingston upon Hull, England, UK
    70 km (45 miles) NE of Nottingham, England, UK
    80 km (50 miles) E of Sheffield, England, UK
    205 km (125 miles) N of LONDON, United Kingdom
    Location Uncertainty Error estimate: horizontal 6.8 km; depth fixed by location program
    Parameters Nst=50, Nph=50, Dmin=291.1 km, Rmss=1.02 sec, Erho=6.8 km, Erzz=0 km, Gp=55.7 degrees
    Source USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)
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    Feb 28, 2008 1:14 PM GMT
    its scary that i understand about 99% of that.
  • vacyclist

    Posts: 162

    Feb 28, 2008 1:46 PM GMT
    NativeDude, thanks for chiming in. As you point out, many people in the mid western US think they are somehow immune from earthquakes...if there were a repeat of the 1812 event at News Madrid (Missouri), there would be widespread damage.

    I studied these beasts in graduate school, but never actually experienced a quake until a couple of years ago when we had a trembler right here in central Virginia (another geologically complex place where a lot of people think the rocks are simple and earthquakes never happen).

    Here's my experience: Key to this story is that my farm is right next to a major rail line, so the sounds & vibrations of trains going by have become second nature. On the day of the trembler, I was walking in the woods on a job about 10 miles from here when I felt vibration in the ground & heard noises too(!) that registered as just another train going by. It wasn't until I was back in my truck & driving down the road that I realized hey, I'm miles away from the closest rail line, that was either a (large) explosion some place nearby, or an earthquake. That night there reports on the radio by my buddies in the seismology lab at Virginia Tech, of a magnitude 3 quake centered nearby. No damage reported but from the viewpoint of a guy standing in the woods, that was some serious energy being released!
  • MikePhilPerez

    Posts: 4357

    Feb 28, 2008 2:22 PM GMT
    Surfwarrior saidNo i don;t think so

    I was up talking to carl on the cam and he is in the uk and he felt it, but we ware too far form the epicentre.

    I think....check the bbc website

    The furtest it seemed to get was County Down, and up into Scotland, i suppose it all depends on the geological make up off your area, is it the right material to propogate a wave of that intensity, after moving across the irish sea, i never heard any reports of people feeling it in Dublin and are you out isolated where you live?

    I certainly didn't feel it here in Galway and i was talking to him before during and after it happened for a good while.


    But my geology only extends to 1st and 2nd year college, so i'm not an expert.


    Well your geology extends more than mine, as I haven't done any, so you no more than me about things like this.

    The movement I felt was like someone puled something from under the legs of the bed. It was very slight though. I think if I was moving in the bed at the time, I would not have noticed. Not sure of the time, but it would have been about the same time as the quake. I thought I had just imagine it, until I heard the news the next morning.

    I live in rural part of Mayo, and there is a lot of rock.

    Mike
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    Feb 28, 2008 2:33 PM GMT
    [quote][cite]MikePhil

    I live in rural part of Mayo, and there is a lot of rock.

    Mike[/quote]




    Haha, what i should of said was 'what type of rock?' each type will propogate the energy released from the hypocentre {the actual point of the quake below the epicentre} ) differently

    Hence why its dangerous to build on sedimentary rocks in a high earthquake frequency zone, like Mexico. When that disaster happened the ground literally turn to dust because the sedimentary bed rock was so soft.

    If you live in the middle of a plate, like us, and an eathquake happens like in the uk, the type of geology and distance all go into how far the energy of the quake will be felt.

    The BBC website gave a pretty good explanation to why that earthquake happened.... i'll not try to paraphrase it, becuase i will probably get it wrong.
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    Feb 28, 2008 5:20 PM GMT
    I don't worry about earthquakes. I mean really, what are the chances that we'll have one out here in the San Francisco Bay Area! LOL I use to have postcards of the SF skyline where all the buildings had fallen over and were leaning on each other and all it said was "but hey, I'm ok". It's amazing how many quakes there are ALL over the world every day.
  • dfrourke

    Posts: 1062

    Feb 28, 2008 5:26 PM GMT
    ...um...anything below 5.0 is like putting $.25 in the hotel bed messager machine [do they even have these anymore?]...

    I doubt your bed moved because of the quake [check for boogie man]...I don't even feel anything below a 5.0 on the Richter scale...but we like those types of earthquakes because they usually take pressure of the nearest fault lines to avoid THE BIG ONE...

    [from your earthquake experts in San Francisco]

    - David
  • MikePhilPerez

    Posts: 4357

    Feb 28, 2008 5:35 PM GMT
    Surfwarrior said[quote][cite]Haha, what i should of said was 'what type of rock?'


    Limestone, I believe.
  • MikePhilPerez

    Posts: 4357

    Feb 28, 2008 5:40 PM GMT
    dfrourke said...um...anything below 5.0 is like putting $.25 in the hotel bed messager machine [do they even have these anymore?]...

    I doubt your bed moved because of the quake [check for boogie man]...I don't even feel anything below a 5.0 on the Richter scale...but we like those types of earthquakes because they usually take pressure of the nearest fault lines to avoid THE BIG ONE...

    [from your earthquake experts in San Francisco]

    - David


    It was 5.2, and I don't believe in the boogie man icon_smile.gif

    Mike
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    Feb 28, 2008 5:49 PM GMT
    dfrourke said...um...anything below 5.0 is like putting $.25 in the hotel bed messager machine [do they even have these anymore?]...

    I doubt your bed moved because of the quake [check for boogie man]...I don't even feel anything below a 5.0 on the Richter scale...but we like those types of earthquakes because they usually take pressure of the nearest fault lines to avoid THE BIG ONE...

    [from your earthquake experts in San Francisco]

    - David


    I think we're very calloused out here! We don't even feel the "small" ones anymore! LOL We're so in tuned with the BIG one!

    And I don't think they do make those beds anymore. Hmmm, that does date you though! LOL

    (another SF area shaker)
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    Feb 29, 2008 12:51 AM GMT
    Earthquakes are the reasons why I hate going to Cali. The thought of the ground moving under me frighten me. But I was surprised when watching the Discovery or TLC channel that earthquakes can pretty much happen anywhere.
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    Feb 29, 2008 1:02 AM GMT
    Yes, it seems there are more and more earthquakes in other places of the US than in CA. I would be more concerned with the annual hurricanes of Florida that destroy half the state every year than the once a decade earthquake that usually results in no more than broken jars of pickles in California.
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    Feb 29, 2008 1:26 AM GMT
    I felt an earthquake when I was growing up on Long Island. It hit (well, maybe "touched" rather than "hit") during an exam in trigonometry class. The desks shook a little and the windows rattled, it felt like a big truck had gone by, but it lasted too long to be a truck. It wasn't even a 3 on the Richter scale, so almost doesn't count.
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    Mar 17, 2008 4:24 AM GMT
    Europe gets earthquakes. I was stationed in Wiesbaden Germany and we had one. It was a rumble in the distance and it grew louder and then my apartment began to shake for almost a minute and then it moved on by and the rumbling grew faint and then was gone. Since it was during the Cold War my first thought was a soviet nuke hit Frankfurt. I didn't know Europe had earthquakes, then. Glad it wasn't a nuke, Frankfort is a nice town.