The cure for HIV how do u feel

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    Sep 17, 2010 5:51 PM GMT
    http://news.oneindia.mobi/2010/09/06/694769.html

    Do u think its real or will work
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    Sep 17, 2010 9:42 PM GMT
    HIV is a Virus. Virus' are incurable or thought to be... so it's highly unlikely to work.
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    Sep 18, 2010 5:31 AM GMT
    I'd have to disagree with the person above me. For my biology class last summer, I wrote a paper on how the CCR5 gene can mutate in a way (known as delta-32) so that on one hand, you don't get HIV, but at the same time, if you get infected with just about every other disease, you can basically die. A few years ago, some German doctors gave a man with HIV a bone marrow transplant from a donor who had the mutation and months later, the traces of HIV in his blood and organs were untraceable. Either because the machines fucked up hardcore in multiple cases or because this gentleman was actually cured of HIV. We think that Delta-32 works in that because it's a deletion allele, a certain protein isn't made that the virus looks for, so it just doesn't bother infecting the cells.
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    Sep 18, 2010 5:41 AM GMT
    Fenix_Stone saidhttp://news.oneindia.mobi/2010/09/06/694769.html

    Do u think its real or will work


    Working in the Biotech, industry we are getting ever closer of understanding the disease. I do believe in our lifetime we will be able to resolve this disease...we have already decoded the human genome, the next steps is decoding the protein sequences, which work is underway. We have unprecedented computer power and technology moving at a faster precedent in human history. By understanding the protein sequences better not only would be better to target a specific against disease, but we would be able to construct therapies with lesser adverse events to the patient. Additionally, recently it was discovered that some therapies are working to completely show undetectable levels of the virus in the blood stream and yet it was in the brain, so we also have to use therapies that will be able to pass the brain barrier without causing undue harm to the patient to target the disease where it can hide.
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    Sep 18, 2010 5:48 AM GMT
    uombroca said
    Fenix_Stone saidhttp://news.oneindia.mobi/2010/09/06/694769.html

    Do u think its real or will work


    Working in the Biotech, industry we are getting ever closer of understanding the disease. I do believe in our lifetime we will be able to resolve this disease...we have already decoded the human genome, the next steps is decoding the protein sequences, which work is underway. We have unprecedented computer power and technology moving at a faster precedent in human history. By understanding the protein sequences better not only would be better to target a specific against disease, but we would be able to construct therapies with lesser adverse events to the patient. Additionally, recently it was discovered that some therapies are working to completely show undetectable levels of the virus in the blood stream and yet it was in the brain, so we also have to use therapies that will be able to pass the brain barrier without causing undue harm to the patient to target the disease where it can hide.


    Here is some more information:

    Over the course of HIV infection, virus replication is facilitated by the phosphorylation of HIV proteins by human ERK1 and ERK2 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). MAPKs are known to phosphorylate their substrates by first binding with them at a docking site. Docking site interactions could be viable drug targets because the sequences guiding them are more specific than phosphorylation consensus sites. In this study we use multiple bioinformatics tools to discover candidate MAPK docking site motifs on HIV proteins known to be phosphorylated by MAPKs, and we discuss the possibility of targeting docking sites with drugs. Using sequence alignments of HIV proteins of different subtypes, we show that MAPK docking patterns previously described for human proteins appear on the HIV matrix, Tat, and Vif proteins in a strain dependent manner, but are absent from HIV Rev and appear on all HIV Nef strains. We revise the regular expressions of previously annotated MAPK docking patterns in order to provide a subtype independent motif that annotates all HIV proteins. One revision is based on a documented human variant of one of the substrate docking motifs, and the other reduces the number of required basic amino acids in the standard docking motifs from two to one. The proposed patterns are shown to be consistent with in silico docking between ERK1 and the HIV matrix protein. The motif usage on HIV proteins is sufficiently different from human proteins in amino acid sequence similarity to allow for HIV specific targeting using small-molecule drugs.
  • charrismd

    Posts: 112

    Sep 18, 2010 5:59 AM GMT
    This research is absolutely fascinating.

    http://www.aidsrestherapy.com/

    The scientific rationale is truly 'outside the box'. Time will tell whether this is feasible in people, not just in test tubes.
  • Hunkymonkey

    Posts: 215

    Sep 18, 2010 3:36 PM GMT
    Looks promising. But will take time to develop and test. I hope it works.
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    Sep 18, 2010 7:10 PM GMT
    Bullwinklemoos saidI'd have to disagree with the person above me. For my biology class last summer, I wrote a paper on how the CCR5 gene can mutate in a way (known as delta-32) so that on one hand, you don't get HIV, but at the same time, if you get infected with just about every other disease, you can basically die. A few years ago, some German doctors gave a man with HIV a bone marrow transplant from a donor who had the mutation and months later, the traces of HIV in his blood and organs were untraceable. Either because the machines fucked up hardcore in multiple cases or because this gentleman was actually cured of HIV. We think that Delta-32 works in that because it's a deletion allele, a certain protein isn't made that the virus looks for, so it just doesn't bother infecting the cells.

    To be fair I said it's highly unlikely. Especially since all strains are different.

    Not that it could never work.
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    Sep 18, 2010 7:38 PM GMT
    I don't think this method will ever fully work. The problem (currently) isn't that we can't stop the virus from replicating in cells. It's that HIV infects dormant cells that do not produce the virus, but reactivate later and regenerate the virus. So, even if this research is valid and the short peptides allow targeting of HIV producing cells, cells that are dormant but contain the virus would still exist and not be killed by this treatment. Hence, later they would reactivate and generate the virus.

    See this article for somewhat more info:
    http://www.realjock.com/article/1735/

    Hopefully, once all the cell types are identified that host the virus, maybe we can develop better treatments.
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    Sep 18, 2010 7:42 PM GMT
    Fenix_Stone saidhttp://news.oneindia.mobi/2010/09/06/694769.html

    Do u think its real or will work

    Too many false claims have been made in the past, too many false hopes created for an HIV cure. Perhaps in some distant future, yes. But like cancer, which likewise is still with us despite being fought since before I was born, I have no expectations, and dismiss these claims as a cruel waste of our time.
  • charrismd

    Posts: 112

    Sep 19, 2010 3:47 AM GMT
    What this research does is give proteins to all infected cells so that the number of viruses within the cell increases; once this happens, the cell dies. If this can happen for all the cells that are infected, no more HIV. Dormancy doesn't matter. The proteins would only have an affect if the cell has already been infected by HIV. The analogy is having the gas pedal stick in all of the RED cars in an INDY car race....they smash into a wall and all of the rest of the cars (blue, green, yellow, brown, pink, etc) are perfectly fine.
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    Sep 19, 2010 3:01 PM GMT
    I'm not sure how the peptides cause increased viral expression, but that also seems semi counterintuitive since increasing the viral replication means more virus that the body has to fight off. But the other major factor is the presence of the blood brain barrier; I doubt the peptides would make it across to attack cells in the brain.