3 police officers retire with severance packages of more than $600,000 each..

  • solak

    Posts: 493

    Sep 21, 2010 6:09 PM GMT
    damn pimpin the taxpayer ain't easy.. oh wait it is icon_cool.gif

    http://www.newsday.com/long-island/nassau/nassau-top-cops-retiring-with-600-000-severance-1.2285644


    "But despite her full-time private job, she remains on the public payroll in Nassau at her $225,693 annual salary"

    i'll ask my boss if i can cash out my sick days when i leave, oh wait i dont have any damn brahh

    "For police, whose union contracts provide generous salaries and high termination pay, the incentive lifts a severance cap imposed by Mangano's predecessor, Democrat Thomas Suozzi, and pays an additional $1,500 a year for every year in service."
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    Sep 21, 2010 7:34 PM GMT
    solak saiddamn pimpin the taxpayer ain't easy.. oh wait it is icon_cool.gif

    http://www.newsday.com/long-island/nassau/nassau-top-cops-retiring-with-600-000-severance-1.2285644


    "But despite her full-time private job, she remains on the public payroll in Nassau at her $225,693 annual salary"

    i'll ask my boss if i can cash out my sick days when i leave, oh wait i dont have any damn brahh

    "For police, whose union contracts provide generous salaries and high termination pay, the incentive lifts a severance cap imposed by Mangano's predecessor, Democrat Thomas Suozzi, and pays an additional $1,500 a year for every year in service."


    What is it you do again?
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    Sep 21, 2010 8:04 PM GMT
    My son is studying to be a police officer, and from the moment he announced his plans I've been coming to terms with his choice to put himself daily into a situation where 9 times out of 10 he might l be called upon just to do domething simple - or he might face a weapon.

    I had hoped he would go into something safer - the armed forces - where every time he went on sortie he would be armed to the teeth, supported by a platoon, and on high alert - anticipating combat as the norm (not the exception).

    So while even one year ago I probably would have raised an eybrow at this kind of payout, I am now inclined to see it in as fully justified for a long career of daily risk in public service defending others against people who have made it their mission to harm.

    He is my only son, and the last who can pass on the family name (if we are traditional about it.)
    And instead of taking the easy ticket to using a legacy as an easy entry to officer training in the CAF, he wants to face down the worst of our society for some reason.

    I respect it.

    But I hate it.


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    Sep 21, 2010 8:19 PM GMT
    UpperCanadian saidMy son is studying to be a police officer, and from the moment he announced his plans I've been coming to terms with his choice to put himself daily into a situation where 9 times out of 10 he might l be called upon just to do domething simple - or he might face a weapon.

    I had hoped he would go into something safer - the armed forces - where every time he went on sortie he would be armed to the teeth, supported by a platoon, and on high alert - anticipating combat as the norm (not the exception).

    So while even one year ago I probably would have raised an eybrow at this kind of payout, I am now inclined to see it in as fully justified for a long career of daily risk in public service defending others against people who have made it their mission to harm.

    He is my only son, and the last who can pass on the family name (if we are traditional about it.)
    And instead of taking the easy ticket to using a legacy as an easy entry to officer training in the CAF, he wants to face down the worst of our society for some reason.

    I respect it.

    But I hate it.




    Great post. I have lot of family members on the force, both active and retired. One of my uncles has a TBI (traumatic brain injury) resulting from breaking up a riot. I have cousins who are putting their lives on the line every day to protect New Yorkers. How do you put a price tag on that?
  • solak

    Posts: 493

    Sep 21, 2010 8:39 PM GMT
    UpperCanadian said
    So while even one year ago I probably would have raised an eybrow at this kind of payout, I am now inclined to see it in as fully justified for a long career of daily risk in public service defending others against people who have made it their mission to harm.


    yet isn't it ironic that exorbitant pay doesn't align with risk? in fact, it's almost inversely related.

    cops earn the most in well to do suburbs where a sudden call is more likely due to a tree branch falling or a deer being moved on the road than say gang warfare..

    never made sense to me why cops in wealthy Bergen County, NJ or tony Long Island (like in this example) received excessive salaries, OT, benefits, pensions, derived from its taxpayers vs those in the Bronx, or East Brooklyn (just miles away) where the element of danger actually exists..

    are pay/benefits/pension subsidized by taxpayers really based on "risk"? as much as unions want us to believe, the numbers tell a different story.
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    Sep 21, 2010 9:06 PM GMT
    solak said
    UpperCanadian said
    So while even one year ago I probably would have raised an eybrow at this kind of payout, I am now inclined to see it in as fully justified for a long career of daily risk in public service defending others against people who have made it their mission to harm.


    yet isn't it ironic that exorbitant pay doesn't align with risk? in fact, it's almost inversely related.

    cops earn the most in well to do suburbs where a sudden call is more likely due to a tree branch falling or a deer being moved on the road than say gang warfare..

    never made sense to me why cops in wealthy Bergen County, NJ or tony Long Island (like in this example) received excessive salaries, OT, benefits, pensions, derived from its taxpayers vs those in the Bronx, or East Brooklyn (just miles away) where the element of danger actually exists..

    are pay/benefits/pension subsidized by taxpayers really based on "risk"? as much as unions want us to believe, the numbers tell a different story.


    Richer people, higher taxes, more money going around. Also something about "higher value property"
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    Sep 21, 2010 9:21 PM GMT
    Do you have a link to this article not behind a paywall? We can't actually read what you are posting about.

    I tried googling the article but could not find it.

    Also, you have no idea how police officers are paid or how salary is calculated, as if police officers in the Bronx had anything to do with officers in Bergen county.
  • solak

    Posts: 493

    Sep 21, 2010 10:15 PM GMT
    MunchingZombie saidDo you have a link to this article not behind a paywall? We can't actually read what you are posting about.

    I tried googling the article but could not find it.


    seems others don't have a problem seeing it, but for the slow:

    http://www.googleguide.com/

    MunchingZombie saidAlso, you have no idea how police officers are paid or how salary is calculated, as if police officers in the Bronx had anything to do with officers in Bergen county.


    the comparison was to counter the argument that pay is based on "risk," as Bergen County is less risky than the Bronx, yet pay is much higher for the former.

    slice it up any way you want, whether local municipalities/counties or states "pay" for these outrages severance packages based on XYZ formula to accrue sick days..

    .. bottom line is the funding is derived from taxpayers who already pay some of the highest property taxes in the nation, forcing many of the poor and middle-income earners to leave.

    and back to the argument that exorbitant pay/subsidized benefits/pensions exist due to "safety risk" as the greedy unions try and paint...

    per bls.gov

    BLS NATIONAL CENSUS OF FATAL OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES
    (job-related fatalities per 100,000 workers in field averaged over last two decades)
    Police & detectives 11.6
    Truck drivers 26.2
    Logging workers 92.4
    Aircraft pilots and flight engineers 92.4
    Fishers and related fishing workers 86.4
    Structural iron and steel workers 47.0
    Refuse and recyclable material collectors 43.2
    Farmers and ranchers 37.5
    Roofers 34.9
    Electrical power-line installers and repairers 30.0
    Driver/sales workers and truck drivers 27.6
    Taxi drivers and chauffeurs 24.2

    so i guess UpperCanadian, you should thank the stars that your son is studying to be a cop rather than a taxi driver.
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    Sep 21, 2010 10:41 PM GMT
    I don't think other people read it as it is behind a paywall. Did you read it? You must be a subscriber to Optimum Online or Newsday.

    Since we can't read it your argument is this: public employees make too much money. Public employees are causing high taxes. Public employees are forcing low and middle class families out to... someplace without public employees?

    Because without an actual article in front of us it is really difficult to see if there is a problem here or if you just have a stick up your ass again about this issue.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Sep 22, 2010 5:14 AM GMT
    MunchingZombie saidI don't think other people read it as it is behind a paywall. Did you read it? You must be a subscriber to Optimum Online or Newsday.

    Since we can't read it your argument is this: public employees make too much money. Public employees are causing high taxes. Public employees are forcing low and middle class families out to... someplace with public employees?

    Because without an actual article in front of us it is really difficult to see if there is a problem here or if you just have a stick up your ass again about this issue.





    Yeh; what he said.
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    Sep 22, 2010 5:20 AM GMT
    Webster666 said
    MunchingZombie saidI don't think other people read it as it is behind a paywall. Did you read it? You must be a subscriber to Optimum Online or Newsday.

    Since we can't read it your argument is this: public employees make too much money. Public employees are causing high taxes. Public employees are forcing low and middle class families out to... someplace with public employees?

    Because without an actual article in front of us it is really difficult to see if there is a problem here or if you just have a stick up your ass again about this issue.





    Yeh; what he said.


    Again, I ask the question: What is it you do?
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    Sep 22, 2010 9:34 PM GMT
    solak said
    I guess UpperCanadian, you should thank the stars that your son is studying to be a cop rather than a taxi driver.



    I am proud of his choice, yes (because I like that h e has chosen a career consistent with the relics and symbols of duty and service he saw all around him growing up.

    If it were my son's choice to be a taxi driver (we need them too) I would be disappointed in him only in that he would be blocking an entry level job that is often the only option for newcomers to Canada to establish themselves and both sides of his family have a long tradition of uniformed service. He has the luxury of choice and a headstart in his education. His future now depends upon the choices he makes and his own efforts. It is awesome to see my little boy doing these things.

    .American statistics are interesting for us to see but do not reflect our reality up here. Ours is not a gun culture and we are rooted in a collectivist philosophy so our two countries do not make good comparisons.

    I believe taxi drivers here are indeed victims of a disproportionate number of robberies, but usually at knifepoint. deadly assaults are exceptional here. The most dangerous professions in my part of the world is still fisherman are and in urban areas are l related to criminal justice.


    Sobering picture of how vulnerable one of the least paid jobs really is.