So I picked up the new Men's Health, and I've got some questions

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 22, 2010 3:06 AM GMT
    I'll admit, I'm a complete fitness noob that's really been wanting to shed some fat and sculpt a nice, tight body. The posture-correcting stretches, the gym-less workout regimen, and the supposedly stomach-slimming exercises kinda drew me in I suppose. What concerns me is that most of these programs emphasize losing fat, and losing it fast. While that sounds great, I'm worried about losing weight too fast. I really don't want to lose 30 lbs. just to have ridiculous flaps of leftover skin. I heard somewhere that to allow the skin to retract appropriately, one would have to lose 1-2 pounds per week. Do the architects of these regimens take that into account? I'd really appreciate if someone who knows enough about weight loss could help dispel my fears. >.>
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 22, 2010 5:07 AM GMT
    First and foremost, get a physical exam from a doctor to make sure you do not have any kind of unknown health issue that might accidentally leave you dead on the gym floor.

    Once you have "health clearance", work on your objectives and goals.
    Baseline the current state/measurements of your body.
    Consider your genetics and what is realistically achievable.
    Formulate your plan.
    As a part of plan development, consider "both sides of the equation". Caloric intake, and caloric output.

    In regards to caloric intake, consider dietary quality, quantity, and then other dimensions such as your metabolic profile, meal timing, etc.

    In regards to caloric output, consider cardiovascular fitness first, then other types of fitness training such as "core conditioning", muscle development, and muscle definition.

    Record your efforts. Periodically measure your current state/measurements. Compare current data against baseline and other data and assess improvement and achievement.

    Adjust your plan accordingly.

    Repeat this Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle to continuously improve your fitness.

    Aloha and Be Well!
    Alan

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 22, 2010 5:32 AM GMT
    Men's Health magazine has an important use. It's beginner gay porn for the young man. I say you graduate to big boy stuff now icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 22, 2010 5:48 AM GMT
    Ciarsolo saidMen's Health magazine has an important use. It's beginner gay porn for the young man. I say you graduate to big boy stuff now icon_wink.gif


    Yes, "Muscle Fitness". icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 22, 2010 6:21 AM GMT
    I lost 30 lbs in two months (mid Dec '09 - mid Feb '10) with no skin flaps...went from 215-185. I "could have" easily lost more fat down to 165 lbs, but had other plans:
    Since then I've put on a few pounds of muscle and simultaneously lost a few more pounds of fat, maintaining ~185 lbs ( 5 lbs) the whole time. THAT...is the tricky part. icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 22, 2010 9:22 AM GMT
    Vetos saidI'll admit, I'm a complete fitness noob that's really been wanting to shed some fat and sculpt a nice, tight body. The posture-correcting stretches, the gym-less workout regimen, and the supposedly stomach-slimming exercises kinda drew me in I suppose. What concerns me is that most of these programs emphasize losing fat, and losing it fast. While that sounds great, I'm worried about losing weight too fast. I really don't want to lose 30 lbs. just to have ridiculous flaps of leftover skin. I heard somewhere that to allow the skin to retract appropriately, one would have to lose 1-2 pounds per week. Do the architects of these regimens take that into account? I'd really appreciate if someone who knows enough about weight loss could help dispel my fears. >.>


    Reality: most people don´t loose fat too fast, just as people don´t get accidently "bulky" by lifting 2 times a week. It takes work, time and consistency to change your body. start!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 22, 2010 10:48 AM GMT
    Vetos saidI'll admit, I'm a complete fitness noob that's really been wanting to shed some fat and sculpt a nice, tight body. The posture-correcting stretches, the gym-less workout regimen, and the supposedly stomach-slimming exercises kinda drew me in I suppose. What concerns me is that most of these programs emphasize losing fat, and losing it fast. While that sounds great, I'm worried about losing weight too fast. I really don't want to lose 30 lbs. just to have ridiculous flaps of leftover skin. I heard somewhere that to allow the skin to retract appropriately, one would have to lose 1-2 pounds per week. Do the architects of these regimens take that into account? I'd really appreciate if someone who knows enough about weight loss could help dispel my fears. >.>


    If you just want to lose some fat, a steady and consistent work out regime will help. This includes weight training and cardio. You probably don't need any shitty weight-loss supplements if you just want to mold your body slightly as opposed to losing tons of weight.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 22, 2010 12:17 PM GMT
    Men's Health Magazine = Drama Club for GIT (Gays in Training)
    Seriously, I congratulate you on taking the good step of asking and planning before jumping into a fitness routine.

    I know this sounds redundant and boring...but diet is 50% of any weight gain/loss routine. This site has very good advice on types of diets, food and supplements.

    take about an hour to go through the articles by the experts.
    and good luck
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 22, 2010 12:21 PM GMT
    Do the people at men's health actually believe their readers will do each fitness session quoted in the magazine?

    I think not!

    Please and fitness is for losers anyway. Go do a real sport and train in the gym to get better at that sport. Don't get all psyched about fitness. Human bodies are not meant to just lift heavy weights.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 22, 2010 12:52 PM GMT
    Men's Health? icon_lol.gif
  • MuscleComeBac...

    Posts: 2376

    Sep 22, 2010 1:16 PM GMT
    Vetos saidI'll admit, I'm a complete fitness noob that's really been wanting to shed some fat and sculpt a nice, tight body. The posture-correcting stretches, the gym-less workout regimen, and the supposedly stomach-slimming exercises kinda drew me in I suppose. What concerns me is that most of these programs emphasize losing fat, and losing it fast. While that sounds great, I'm worried about losing weight too fast. I really don't want to lose 30 lbs. just to have ridiculous flaps of leftover skin. I heard somewhere that to allow the skin to retract appropriately, one would have to lose 1-2 pounds per week. Do the architects of these regimens take that into account? I'd really appreciate if someone who knows enough about weight loss could help dispel my fears. >.>


    Fuck the skin-flaps....the biggest fear you have to overcome is DOING IT. Truly. You'll be fine. It's difficult to impossible for anyone here to guide you much further with no profile info like age, current weight, height, etc.

    Regardless, getting started is all that matters. Getting started intelligently will help you keep going and not lose motivation, momentum and desire.

    Lose the magazine. It's nothing more than soft-core porn with some basic routines thrown out to the masses, where it will stick with a few and slide off the rest. They say "LOSE 10 POUNDS NOW!" because they're appealing to the same crowd that responds to "Drive Through and Eat In Your Car, Now!".

    Some of the best "getting started" routines are actually here on RealJock, and you can search them through the Workout Plans on the toolbar at the top of the page.

    All that matters "now" is your desire to get into shape and stay in shape. Don't over-think it. Just DO it. You'll feel results within ten days, and start seeing real results within six weeks. Be patient, be persistent and be healthy.

    Oh...and I take back what I said about losing the magazine....you'll need it to "take care of things" once you have increased energy and libido. Which will then make it useful as it will be serving its real purpose. icon_twisted.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 22, 2010 1:59 PM GMT
    Getting fit isn't rocket science. Don't treat it as such. You're analyzing things way too much.
  • rnch

    Posts: 11524

    Sep 22, 2010 2:11 PM GMT
    reppaT saidMen's Health? icon_lol.gif



    it's what i scan thru when the grocery store check out line is empty of the national inquirer. icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 22, 2010 4:00 PM GMT
    reppaT saidMen's Health? icon_lol.gif
    Well, masturbation IS healthy. icon_wink.gif
  • dionysus

    Posts: 420

    Sep 22, 2010 4:08 PM GMT
    Vetos saidI'll admit, I'm a complete fitness noob that's really been wanting to shed some fat and sculpt a nice, tight body. The posture-correcting stretches, the gym-less workout regimen, and the supposedly stomach-slimming exercises kinda drew me in I suppose. What concerns me is that most of these programs emphasize losing fat, and losing it fast. While that sounds great, I'm worried about losing weight too fast. I really don't want to lose 30 lbs. just to have ridiculous flaps of leftover skin. I heard somewhere that to allow the skin to retract appropriately, one would have to lose 1-2 pounds per week. Do the architects of these regimens take that into account? I'd really appreciate if someone who knows enough about weight loss could help dispel my fears. >.>


    most likely not, nor will you find these workouts to actually work as well. i would suggest consulting your doctor to determine the interval of working out you can do in a week and then start slow, take a 1 mile walk, 3 times a week. after make it 1.5 miles, three weeks from start day, make it 2 miles. now make it 2.5 miles and then tack on about .5 miles of jogging. if you continue this eventually progression up, you'll pull down fat while slowly adding on a cardio routine to your lifestyle on a 3x a week, or maybe 4x, 5x. but you should start very slow and not jump into a middle age average routine that mens health is geared at.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 22, 2010 6:59 PM GMT
    paulflexes said
    reppaT saidMen's Health? icon_lol.gif
    Well, masturbation IS healthy. icon_wink.gif


    You don't waste that precious sperm on Men's Health, do you? If you do, lie to me. I don't want my image of you to be ruined. icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 22, 2010 9:32 PM GMT
    reppaT said
    paulflexes said
    reppaT saidMen's Health? icon_lol.gif
    Well, masturbation IS healthy. icon_wink.gif


    You don't waste that precious sperm on Men's Health, do you? If you do, lie to me. I don't want my image of you to be ruined. icon_wink.gif
    Before coming out of the closet, fuck yeah I did! icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 22, 2010 10:05 PM GMT
    I'd recommend joining a gym with group classes. RPM/Spin and/or Bodyattack for cardio and BodyPump as an introduction to weight training. It's a great way to get in the rhythm.

    Forming good eating and exercise habits will be your key to success. Set some realistic goals to aim for. It will take time so you'll need to be motivated and dedicated.

    Also, don't focus on your weight, if your a numbers man use bodyfat % as an indicator.

    Good luck!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Sep 23, 2010 10:57 AM GMT
    Best to go a fitness trainer who is also knowledgeable about diet.
  • DanOmatic

    Posts: 1155

    Sep 23, 2010 11:17 AM GMT
    Whether it's Men's Health or Men's Fitness, both of those (and most other similar publications) are completely bogus. While there might be a small kernel of fitness advice here and there that might actualy be useful, for the most part they're full of re- (and re- re-) regurgitated tripe about "new fitness breakthroughs" (subscribe for a year, and within a couple of months, you'll ask yourself if you didn't read that same article two months previous, but with different photos), interspersed with stupid features about "what your woman REALLY wants" (hint: sex!), while at the same time blitzing you with adverts about shit you don't need.

    Everybody is different, so there is no one-size-fits-all approach. Talk to a trainer about the best approach for you to take to reach your fitness goals.