One just invested in Americas future!

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    Oct 01, 2010 7:51 AM GMT
    I just Donated to Mitts campaign.

    What have you done today?

    Have you done anything for Oz today?
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    Oct 01, 2010 3:01 PM GMT
    Not a fan of Romney really. I'll probably be donating to Ron Johnson and Scott Walker.

    Can't wait for foolsgold (feingold) to be gone.
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    Oct 01, 2010 9:06 PM GMT
    Mock, I'm surprised at your position against Russ Feingold. He holds positions that are notoriously bipartisan. He's one of the most frugal politicians in Congress (even returned pay raises and appropriations), and gets commended by watchgroups for pork barrel like Citizens Against Government Waste, the Concord Coalition, and Taxpayers for Common Sense. The McCain-Feingold campaign finance reform should have his name first by right.

    If anything, your libertarian leanings should align you with him, since he was the only one that opposed the Patriot Act, and one of the few that opposed the Iraqi War. He's against the death penalty.

    As opposed to a federal health plan, in 2006 (!) he's introduced a state-based health reform plan that would provide universal health care. (Whoops, I forgot you're against universal health care.)

    And he's one of the few well-known politicians that have publicly supported same-sex marriage and voted against DOMA.

    If he were to run for President I would vote for him.

    PS His opponent Ron Johnson sounds kinda of wacky:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ron_Johnson_%28Wisconsin%29Johnson sided with Catholic Church leaders in opposing a proposed Child Victims Act in testimony before a state Senate committee.[7] Johnson stands by his January 2010 testimony on the Child Victims Act, which would eliminate the statute of limitations for victims of child abuse. Johnson said he opposed the Child Victims Act because it could have financially hurt groups like the Scouts.[8]

    When asked about allowing offshore drilling for oil in the Great Lakes, Johnson responded, "We have to get the oil where it is." After his opponents criticized this position, his campaign clarified his statement noting that Johnson's answer did not mean he supports drilling in the Great Lakes.[9] Johnson criticized President Barack Obama for holding BP responsible for cleaning up the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.[10] Johnson disclosed that he owns more than $100,000 worth of stock in BP.[9]

    Johnson has described scientists who attribute global warming (the current climate change) to man-made causes as "crazy" and the theory as "lunacy." As to his opinion on the source of climate change, Johnson said, "It's far more likely that it's just sunspot activity or just something in the geologic eons of time." He gave no response when asked to give evidence supporting the sun-spot theory.[11]
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    Oct 01, 2010 10:27 PM GMT
    q1w2e3 saidMock, I'm surprised at your position against Russ Feingold. He holds positions that are notoriously bipartisan. He's one of the most frugal politicians in Congress (even returned pay raises and appropriations), and gets commended by watchgroups for pork barrel like Citizens Against Government Waste, the Concord Coalition, and Taxpayers for Common Sense. The McCain-Feingold campaign finance reform should have his name first by right.

    If anything, your libertarian leanings should align you with him, since he was the only one that opposed the Patriot Act, and one of the few that opposed the Iraqi War. He's against the death penalty.

    As opposed to a federal health plan, in 2006 (!) he's introduced a state-based health reform plan that would provide universal health care. (Whoops, I forgot you're against universal health care.)

    And he's one of the few well-known politicians that have publicly supported same-sex marriage and voted against DOMA.

    If he were to run for President I would vote for him.

    PS His opponent Ron Johnson sounds kinda of wacky:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ron_Johnson_%28Wisconsin%29Johnson sided with Catholic Church leaders in opposing a proposed Child Victims Act in testimony before a state Senate committee.[7] Johnson stands by his January 2010 testimony on the Child Victims Act, which would eliminate the statute of limitations for victims of child abuse. Johnson said he opposed the Child Victims Act because it could have financially hurt groups like the Scouts.[8]

    When asked about allowing offshore drilling for oil in the Great Lakes, Johnson responded, "We have to get the oil where it is." After his opponents criticized this position, his campaign clarified his statement noting that Johnson's answer did not mean he supports drilling in the Great Lakes.[9] Johnson criticized President Barack Obama for holding BP responsible for cleaning up the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.[10] Johnson disclosed that he owns more than $100,000 worth of stock in BP.[9]

    Johnson has described scientists who attribute global warming (the current climate change) to man-made causes as "crazy" and the theory as "lunacy." As to his opinion on the source of climate change, Johnson said, "It's far more likely that it's just sunspot activity or just something in the geologic eons of time." He gave no response when asked to give evidence supporting the sun-spot theory.[11]


    You correctly point out that there are many things Russ Feingold has done right in the past and I have supported him as a candidate, but he has been in there for like 18 years. It is time for him to go. He has deteriorated over the last few years and supporting obamacare was not one of his wiser moves.

    As far as Ron Johnson, he's a godsend. He's not an extreme religious nut. Just someone who owns a business and creates jobs with no previous experience as a politician. .
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    Oct 01, 2010 10:46 PM GMT
    mocktwinkie said
    As far as Ron Johnson, he's a godsend. He's not an extreme religious nut. Just someone who owns a business and creates jobs with no previous experience as a politician. .


    OK, not a religious nut...but enough to make up science to counter questions about global warming.
    Own a business...and some stock in BP which he sold to finance his campaign.
    He's for free markets and Wisconsin agriculture and against the federal government picking winners and losers...no matter that Wisconsin picked up $5.9 billion in agricultural subsidies between 1995 and 2009.
    http://farm.ewg.org/region.php?fips=55000
    He's for "Wisconsin" values:
    http://ronjohnsonforsenate.com/home/issues/preserving-wisconsin-values/Ron is pro-life, pro-family, and believes that freedom of religion doesn’t mean freedom from religion. Ron will take these principles with him to Washington and will stand up to those who would attack these cherished traditional values.

    God save those who can't escape from his religion, you included, Mock.
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    Oct 02, 2010 2:35 AM GMT
    mocktwinkie saidNot a fan of Romney really. I'll probably be donating to Ron Johnson and Scott Walker.

    Can't wait for foolsgold (feingold) to be gone.


    Good for you, it looks like the liberal wacko feingold is on his way out. Ron Johnson has run a really great campaign and will make a great Senator. As far as the loser rino Romney goes he should be a used car salesman.
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    Oct 02, 2010 2:38 AM GMT
    mocktwinkie said
    q1w2e3 saidMock, I'm surprised at your position against Russ Feingold. He holds positions that are notoriously bipartisan. He's one of the most frugal politicians in Congress (even returned pay raises and appropriations), and gets commended by watchgroups for pork barrel like Citizens Against Government Waste, the Concord Coalition, and Taxpayers for Common Sense. The McCain-Feingold campaign finance reform should have his name first by right.

    If anything, your libertarian leanings should align you with him, since he was the only one that opposed the Patriot Act, and one of the few that opposed the Iraqi War. He's against the death penalty.

    As opposed to a federal health plan, in 2006 (!) he's introduced a state-based health reform plan that would provide universal health care. (Whoops, I forgot you're against universal health care.)

    And he's one of the few well-known politicians that have publicly supported same-sex marriage and voted against DOMA.

    If he were to run for President I would vote for him.

    PS His opponent Ron Johnson sounds kinda of wacky:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ron_Johnson_%28Wisconsin%29Johnson sided with Catholic Church leaders in opposing a proposed Child Victims Act in testimony before a state Senate committee.[7] Johnson stands by his January 2010 testimony on the Child Victims Act, which would eliminate the statute of limitations for victims of child abuse. Johnson said he opposed the Child Victims Act because it could have financially hurt groups like the Scouts.[8]

    When asked about allowing offshore drilling for oil in the Great Lakes, Johnson responded, "We have to get the oil where it is." After his opponents criticized this position, his campaign clarified his statement noting that Johnson's answer did not mean he supports drilling in the Great Lakes.[9] Johnson criticized President Barack Obama for holding BP responsible for cleaning up the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.[10] Johnson disclosed that he owns more than $100,000 worth of stock in BP.[9]

    Johnson has described scientists who attribute global warming (the current climate change) to man-made causes as "crazy" and the theory as "lunacy." As to his opinion on the source of climate change, Johnson said, "It's far more likely that it's just sunspot activity or just something in the geologic eons of time." He gave no response when asked to give evidence supporting the sun-spot theory.[11]


    You correctly point out that there are many things Russ Feingold has done right in the past and I have supported him as a candidate, but he has been in there for like 18 years. It is time for him to go. He has deteriorated over the last few years and supporting obamacare was not one of his wiser moves.

    As far as Ron Johnson, he's a godsend. He's not an extreme religious nut. Just someone who owns a business and creates jobs with no previous experience as a politician. .


    I did some research on Ron Johnson and I think I'm going to donate as well. Anyone who has run a business and is an outsider to politics deserves to be in the Senate. You just raised some money for him.




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    Oct 02, 2010 5:35 AM GMT
    aunty_jack saidI just Donated to Mitts campaign.



    Ick.

    That's almost as unseemly as still calling one's self "Aunty" in 2010.
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    Oct 02, 2010 6:40 PM GMT
    CHRISMAI did some research on Ron Johnson and I think I'm going to donate as well. Anyone who has run a business and is an outsider to politics deserves to be in the Senate. You just raised some money for him.


    http://www.economist.com/node/17147638?story_id=17147638Money and power
    Beware the lure of the businessman-politician

    What explains this enthusiasm for turning to businesspeople to solve political problems? You might have thought that people would have tired of it after George Bush’s two administrations or Silvio Berlusconi’s three. Mr Bush, a Harvard MBA, appointed four former chief executives to his first cabinet; Mr Berlusconi has done more than any man alive to blur the distinction between the public and the private sector. You might also have thought the economic crisis had increased hostility to highly paid businesspeople...

    How likely are these bosses-turned-politicians to keep their promises? There are a few successes. Michael Bloomberg has been such a hit as mayor that normally irascible New Yorkers have elected him to a third term. Businesspeople do have more experience of squeezing efficiency gains from the internet than professional politicians and they have less of a vested interest in expanding the supply of government.

    But there is little evidence to support the common belief that businesspeople possess management skills that can easily be imported into the public sector. On the contrary, government and business are built on very different principles. For all the fashionable talk about empowering employees, bosses are ultimately the masters of their own domains. There are no civil-service style regulations to protect employees from the wrath of an angry CEO: when he or she says jump, you jump. Company bosses can usually escape from the pressure of public opinion and the glare of publicity that defines political life. Even those who are drafted into politics rather than forced to stand for election, find they are in a far more confusing world than the one they are familiar with.

    The politics of disastrous management

    A striking number of businesspeople prove to be failures as politicians. Paul O’Neill was one of Alcoa’s most successful bosses. But, as Mr Bush’s first treasury secretary, he was rapidly reduced to a laughing-stock. Ross Perot turned Electronic Data Systems into a giant. But his two runs for the presidency left most Americans with the impression that his tray table is not in the fully upright and locked position. Donald Rumsfeld was a successful boss of two big companies. But his name is synonymous with one of the worst-managed wars in American history.

    Bringing businesspeople into politics can also produce corruption and cronyism. Russia’s oligarchs flit between government and business. Mr Berlusconi has built conflict of interest into the heart of Italian life. Dick Cheney, a former boss of Halliburton, an oil-and-gas company, made sure his secretive energy task-force relied heavily on his buddies from the energy industry.

    This is not to imply that politicians are paragons of either virtue or competence. But the most important thing in politics is structure, not personnel. The best way to inject the virtues of business into public life is not to draft in a few ex-bosses—even outstanding ones like Ms Whitman—but to introduce as much choice and competition as possible into the public sector.


    Race to the Top, anyone? (as opposed to government contracts to defense companies with no bidding).