A question to Americans who travel outside of the US.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 07, 2010 12:05 AM GMT
    Now you may find this a strange question. But I've been watch a doc co on my Head of State: Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. Where American reporters was at Buckingham Place, the official Resident of Her Majesty. They asked what do you feed American quest to the place?

    The rely was: when foreigners come here they normally want to try something English.

    The American reporter made the comment that most Americans would not consider themselves foreigners. I thought OMG and they call the British pompous.

    So my question is, when you are outside the US, do you consider yourself a foreigner? I mean if you are in my country Oz you are!

    Also I myself when overseas loves the way everyone talks with an accent, even Americans.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 07, 2010 1:19 AM GMT
    10 looks to date yet no replies. The odds are that at least one has thought, no I don't consider myself a foreigner outside the US.
  • OklahomaBreak...

    Posts: 167

    Oct 07, 2010 1:23 AM GMT
    Depends on how long and the country. I was in Europe all summer, but even in Ireland and the UK didn't feel real at home. I was in a different country and tried to do "Irish/English" things. A lot of commonalities there between the three of us so eventually it became a norm. Every so often something would strike me as foreign, but within the US there is so much transplanted Irish and English culture it was difficult to see a lot of situations are really foreign. Switzerland, Italy, Spain, and France on the other hand were completely foreign to me.

    Does this somewhat answer your question, or at least satisfy as a 11 looks 1 response?
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    Oct 07, 2010 3:32 AM GMT
    When I'm out of the country, I always try to experience the local culture, etc... If I wanted to only experience America, I wouldn't bother traveling. It actually annoys me when Americans travel outside of the country and expect everything to be exactly like at home. Like, "Why don't these people speak English" or "Where's the Applebees", etc...
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    Oct 07, 2010 3:37 AM GMT
    aunty_jack saidmost Americans would not consider themselves foreigners.

    Most american really are as ignorant as the day is long. A real embarrassment to the country


    So my question is, when you are outside the US, do you consider yourself a foreigner?

    Of course
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    Oct 07, 2010 3:56 AM GMT
    Thanks guys. As much as I like my county, I do like to go and experience other aspects of diffrent cultures, so I do try to hook up with locals to help me with that. Even in my own county I from time to time take myself out of my comfort zone, and maybe go over to the west, and in that in many ways is like being in a diffrent county from where I live in the East.

    Albeit I felt what the reporter meant about Americans did not see themselves as foreigners outside of America. That thought got me by suprise as the moment I leave Oz, I am a foreigner. Even if I went to the land of my forefathers Switzerland, as I am 6 generations born to Oz.


    Now if I was to get on a plan now and go and live in Hawai'i for the rest of my life. I would consider myself forever a foreigner, as I would never be American even if I was to become a citizen, as I would be forever Aussie, nor Hawaiian.

    Also as a foriner in another land I try not to compair it to home, as it's not home.
  • Descamisado

    Posts: 95

    Oct 07, 2010 4:18 AM GMT

    So my question is, when you are outside the US, do you consider yourself a foreigner? I mean if you are in my country Oz you are!

    Of course! What else would I be? Even in English-speaking places I'm constantly reminded of my foreignness. And thank God for it!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 07, 2010 4:32 AM GMT
    Yup. Whenever I visit another country I consider myself a foreigner. Simple as that. I'm not from there, I don't pay taxes there nor claim it and regardless of how often I might a visit a place or how well I know it if it requires that I need my passport then I'm a foreigner.
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    Oct 07, 2010 4:58 AM GMT
    It depends where. My dad used to live in Prague for about 10 years of my life so I would go out to see him 2-3 times a year. I'm so comfortable there I have my favorite restaurants, and on my first day there o would usually go buy donuts down the street of winstel square (I believe that's right its been a while since ive been there).

    Anywhere else, and yes I am a foreigner.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Oct 07, 2010 5:06 AM GMT
    "The American reporter made the comment that most Americans would not consider themselves foreigners."
    ____________________________________________
    I'm wondering if he meant that Americans would feel "right at home" in England.

    Regardless, I'm a foreigner, in any country other than my own.
  • Hunter9

    Posts: 1039

    Oct 07, 2010 5:22 AM GMT
    Americans aren't foreign in any country. The world is ours, don't you know?
  • tajsreve

    Posts: 418

    Oct 07, 2010 5:49 AM GMT
    I think Webster666 was right, the reporter was trying to make a compliment that any American would feel at home in England. Be that as it may, I have lived in Europe for 6 years now and being from a small town in Kansas.. trust me... anywhere I go, within the Continental US or abroad. I am a foreigner. Nothing feels the same. I have not been back to my home town in 20 years and it didn't even feel the same 20 years ago.

    Like halldt said, where ever I am it annoys me when Americans visit and want to know where's Starbucks / McDonalds / Applebees etc.
    Also, "Why don't these people speak English!" is particularly irritating & embarassing.

    When I am in a Foreign country I absorb myself. I want to know what it is like to be a citizen. I will never be German no matter how long I live here but I think I have an understanding now of what it is like to be a German, not totally but somewhat.
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    Oct 07, 2010 5:52 AM GMT
    I don't think most Canadians or Americans consider themselves real foreigners when they travel back and forth between their two countries. Unless you look at a mailbox or flag or a few minor things all looks much the same and without seeing those most people would be hard pressed to guess which country they were in. I definitely feel like a foreigner though when I've been in other countries
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    Oct 07, 2010 5:56 AM GMT
    Having been in Australia, the UK and the US for extended periods I would only say I felt as a Foreigner while in the UK. OZ was home from the moment of arrival and being half/half cdn/american I've never even thought about feeling out of place in either country. Although when asked, I will state I am Canadian.
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    Oct 07, 2010 5:57 AM GMT
    ^ I don't know about that. Every time I cross the 49th going south, I definitely know that I have left Canada. The signage is different, the flags are different, the level of policing is different, the way people talk is different, the life styles are different, and I have to pay attention to the miles per hour gauge on my dashboard.
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    Oct 07, 2010 6:09 AM GMT
    Webster666 said"The American reporter made the comment that most Americans would not consider themselves foreigners."
    ____________________________________________
    I'm wondering if he meant that Americans would feel "right at home" in England.

    Regardless, I'm a foreigner, in any country other than my own.


    It was a she, but that not important.

    Good point, maybe she did mean that Americans would feel right at home in England.

    Or so much of Americas roots are from England. His Royal Hiness George III was once your Head of State; your Ruler.

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    Oct 07, 2010 6:11 AM GMT
    ^ Yes, but Americans don't like to talk about George W. Bush any more. ;)
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    Oct 07, 2010 6:17 AM GMT
    tajsreve saidI think Webster666 was right, the reporter was trying to make a compliment that any American would feel at home in England. Be that as it may, I have lived in Europe for 6 years now and being from a small town in Kansas.. trust me... anywhere I go, within the Continental US or abroad. I am a foreigner. Nothing feels the same. I have not been back to my home town in 20 years and it didn't even feel the same 20 years ago.

    Like halldt said, where ever I am it annoys me when Americans visit and want to know where's Starbucks / McDonalds / Applebees etc.
    Also, "Why don't these people speak English!" is particularly irritating & embarassing.

    When I am in a Foreign country I absorb myself. I want to know what it is like to be a citizen. I will never be German no matter how long I live here but I think I have an understanding now of what it is like to be a German, not totally but somewhat.


    Thank you for your input.

    As for food. This is one of the things I go out of my way to try local foods. I'm longing to get to Japan, and get into those back ally restaurants where the locals eat, and not the ones for tourists. I remember once being in ST George Utah and talking with this young man and all he was worried about coming to Oz was not being able to eat. I had to resturant him my city is one of the best in Oz and the world to eat out in for diversity, and qulity. Nope so long as they had McDonald's he was fine. I was likeicon_rolleyes.gif
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    Oct 07, 2010 6:22 AM GMT
    NoSuchPerson said^ I don't know about that. Every time I cross the 49th going south, I definitely know that I have left Canada. The signage is different, the flags are different, the level of policing is different, the way people talk is different, the life styles are different, and I have to pay attention to the miles per hour gauge on my dashboard.


    In any ways me traveling all the way to the US I too feel the same. they drive on the wrong side of the road, their flag is diffrent, albeit sometime for a moment when driving I feel I could be in Victoria or South Australia, then I see this great big bloody mountain, and I know I;m not home.

    or I ask do they do take away and I'm told no you have to pay for it. Now I know it's to go and not take away. Then when people hear me talk it's are you from England; nope. Irland; nope. Where did you learn to talk like that then/ I tell em Arkansas, some people have believed me too.
  • alphatop

    Posts: 1955

    Oct 07, 2010 6:24 AM GMT
    Kinda stupid question, but here it goes- I am not resident of US (Americans are also people from South America, not only US, cause America is a continent, not a country), nor I will ever be. Not that I have something against common ppl in US, but there is this general opinion worldwide that US citizen are kinda...slow...not into different languages or cultures, but their own...which is weird, considering that US inhabitants came from all over the world...anyhow, I have good friends in NYC and California, and they are great guys/girls ...what I want to say is that US residents should blend within local culture when traveling, in order to learn something new and different, beside the "US dream"...not all the people in the world like that dream...there is also Chinese dream, or Turkish dream, or whatever dream there is...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 07, 2010 6:25 AM GMT
    I don't want to stereotype, so I'll call this categories. In my travels throughout the world, I've generally found two types of American traveler.

    The first is the the stereotypical one. The ones that expect the rest of the world to be like America or seek out American type experiences in another country. They pack in a lot of travel and sights in a few days, let everyone know they are American, pick up some cheap souvenirs and then skip back to the USA.

    The other is the complete opposite. They take in the local culture and cuisine. They go for the gusto and take in new experiences and eschew anything everything that might possibly be remotely American. They drink the wine, they try the cava, they eat the kangaroo meat, the slurp down the escargot, the lick up the gelatto and lap up the espresso. They don't care to talk about back home (it will still be there when they get back) and they just take in the moment.

    But that's life. Everyone's different.
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    Oct 07, 2010 6:25 AM GMT
    tallcanuck saidHaving been in Australia, the UK and the US for extended periods I would only say I felt as a Foreigner while in the UK. OZ was home from the moment of arrival and being half/half cdn/american I've never even thought about feeling out of place in either country. Although when asked, I will state I am Canadian.



    I can understand why a Canadian may feel at home here albeit we are very diffrent and don't yet pay as much taxation. But I have met many Canadians who love it down here. But just like me being in the US the minute you open your mouth and say something, and I don't even have an accent.
  • drypin

    Posts: 1798

    Oct 07, 2010 6:35 AM GMT
    Hmm, I often feel like a foreigner when I visit my aunt in the mountains of Kentucky or a former classmate in Alabama or, most of all, Los Angeles. Not sure England, Ireland or Australia felt so much different in terms of unfamiliar accents, eating habits and clothing styles. Just unfamiliar currency to spend.
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    Oct 07, 2010 6:35 AM GMT
    I gotta say thanks guys. That statment just blew me away, and I just did not know how to interpret it. Now I don't think it was as pompous as I first thought.

    Also in the Doc co I'm watching a big segment of was about a trip Her majesty made to the US when George JR was still in the White House First the Queen went to Richmond Vagina, A place she first went on her first trip to the US over 50 years ago; then 50. She went to is it Jackson town?

    Then On the Washington. You know many of you Americans love her and you went to a hell of a lot of trouble to impress her and too make her feel at home. Mind George made the faux pas of her first being in the US in the 1700s.. Thanks for being so kind and respectful to my head of State.

    Oh I think I really would like Laura Bush too.
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    Oct 07, 2010 6:40 AM GMT
    antonomad saidKinda stupid question, but here it goes- I am not resident of US (Americans are also people from South America, not only US, cause America is a continent, not a country), nor I will ever be. Not that I have something against common ppl in US, but there is this general opinion worldwide that US citizen are kinda...slow...not into different languages or cultures, but their own...which is weird, considering that US inhabitants came from all over the world...anyhow, I have good friends in NYC and California, and they are great guys/girls ...what I want to say is that US residents should blend within local culture when traveling, in order to learn something new and different, beside the "US dream"...not all the people in the world like that dream...there is also Chinese dream, or Turkish dream, or whatever dream there is...


    I have lived with an American for 20 years now and it has taken me a long time to get him away from all his american eating habits. like only eating beef, chicken turkey, and caned tuna. Gosh there pork, lamb, veal, and so on.