A greener, prettier New York

  • beaujangle

    Posts: 1701

    Oct 10, 2010 10:54 AM GMT
    NYC seems to get better! Good job!


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    Oct 10, 2010 12:35 PM GMT
    I don't like it. I miss old New York. Thanks Mayor Bloomingicon_evil.gif
  • coolarmydude

    Posts: 9190

    Oct 10, 2010 12:42 PM GMT
    I noticed how pedestrian-friendly Times Square became when I was there just before New Year's Eve. Thank you, New York City!
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    Oct 10, 2010 12:48 PM GMT

    I love it! Mayor B, has revitalized the energy of New York. Ppl once again dominate the streets! So yes thanks Mayor B.
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    Oct 10, 2010 12:48 PM GMT
    I cannot stand PR b-roll, which is exactly what this is.

    The cycling infrastructure they're touting is a friggin' disaster, and the initiative to limit street traffic isn't limiting it at all. Now, it's one big bottleneck.

    What they're doing is great for tourists, but it's not designed with the New York city resident in mind. It's designed specifically to generate revenue for the city, not make the city greener, cleaner or safer.

    Hey, Bloomberg, want to really improve the city? Why not go underground and fix the transit system? And I LOVE what you've done with homeless population in the Big Apple. Now, NYC is just as bad as San Francisco. There's nothing like being harassed by homeless people 3, 4+ times a day.

    The city is in worse shape now than it has been since the early 90's.
  • laxdude25

    Posts: 604

    Oct 10, 2010 1:15 PM GMT
    I've lived in NYC on and off since the late 70's.I worked for City Hall under the Koch administration in working on a lot of the planning for the city. I'm not sure that ReppaT and I live in the same city given his comments. I am a biker, use the subway system daily to get everywhere, and also enjoy everything culturally that NY has to offer, both traditional stuff as well as edgier stuff. I also have kids who have spent most of the teen years growing up in NY, doing sports (lax, soccer, skating/hockey), and NY has been a great place for them. Bloomberg isn't perfect (the West Side stadium and Olympic bids were terrible distractions), but NYC is safer, better run, cleaner, and yes, still an overall more interesting city.
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    Oct 10, 2010 1:45 PM GMT
    NYC is safer, cleaner and better run than it was under Rudi? Uhm, I don't know of many who would agree with you. You and I must be living in entirely different cities. Of course, your bias plays no role here, does it?

    The subways are a fucking mess, traffic congestion has only become worse, homeless is worse today than it was in the early 90's. My partner was born and raised in NYC, as were many of our friends. They all voice these same concerns. I can only voice my opinion based on my observations from 1993 to present, and I'm telling you that - for a NYC resident - the city has seen better days.

    Of course bicyclists love the changes, but cyclists in general tend to disregard pedestrians. Now, I'm sure you're a cyclist who obeys all of the laws, but I cannot tell you how many times I've tried crossing the street when I had the right of way, only to have some fucking cyclist almost motor right into me. This is particularly bad in Chelsea and the W. Village.

    Is NYC still the greatest city in the world? Certainly. Is NYC in better shape today than it was 10-15 years ago? No way.

    http://www.aolnews.com/crime/article/nyc-murder-rate-up-20-percent-so-far-in-2010/19417962

    http://www.nydailynews.com/blogs/dailypolitics/2010/09/nyc-budget-update-were-still-b.html

    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/09/18/spokes-the-cyclist-pedestrian-wars/
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    Oct 10, 2010 1:56 PM GMT
    NYC is trying to be the greenest city.

    They also have plans for rising currents which had a great exhibit at MoMA this summer.

    http://www.moma.org/explore/inside_out/2010/09/01/rising-currents-boat-tour-understanding-the-present-and-imagining-a-possible-future

    MoMA and P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center joined forces to address one of the most urgent challenges facing the nation’s largest city: sea-level rise resulting from global climate change. Though the national debate on infrastructure is currently focused on “shovel-ready” projects that will stimulate the economy, we now have an important opportunity to foster new research and fresh thinking about the use of New York City's harbor and coastline. As in past economic recessions, construction has slowed dramatically in New York, and much of the city’s remarkable pool of architectural talent is available to focus on innovation.
    An architects-in-residence program at P.S.1 (November 16, 2009–January 8, 2010) brings together five interdisciplinary teams to re-envision the coastlines of New York and New Jersey around New York Harbor and to imagine new ways to occupy the harbor itself with adaptive “soft” infrastructures that are sympathetic to the needs of a sound ecology. These creative solutions are intended to dramatically change our relationship to one of the city’s great open spaces.
    This installation presents the proposals developed during the architects-in-residence program, including a wide array of models, drawings, and analytical materials.
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    Oct 10, 2010 2:04 PM GMT
    reppat, i dont live in NYC and cant dispute your'e opinions of the last 17 years, but the first link you posted indicated that crime was up this year specifically believed to be so by officials due to budget cuts in the police department.
    and although that isnt good and does impact quality if life, the NYCplan video post was about urban planning and greener cities specifically.
    they weren't touting the NYPD.

    in general, i think more bike lanes and more pedestrian space = better.i think these changes arent quick or smooth, but i do feel its a step in the right direction.

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    Oct 10, 2010 2:15 PM GMT
    Yes, I did go off subject, but was referring to laxdude's comments about NYC being safer, better run, and cleaner. It is safer, cleaner and better run in the areas where tourists are most common, but it is turning to shit in many residential areas. The UWS, where I live, and UES have seen service cuts and experienced quality of life issues that aren't being addressed in the OP.

    The OP speaks to tourists and businesses driven by tourist traffic. It does not address the reality that is NYC.
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    Oct 10, 2010 4:19 PM GMT
    reppaT saidNYC is safer, cleaner and better run than it was under Rudi? Uhm, I don't know of many who would agree with you. You and I must be living in entirely different cities. Of course, your bias plays no role here, does it?

    The subways are a fucking mess, traffic congestion has only become worse, homeless is worse today than it was in the early 90's. My partner was born and raised in NYC, as were many of our friends. They all voice these same concerns. I can only voice my opinion based on my observations from 1993 to present, and I'm telling you that - for a NYC resident - the city has seen better days.

    Of course bicyclists love the changes, but cyclists in general tend to disregard pedestrians. Now, I'm sure you're a cyclist who obeys all of the laws, but I cannot tell you how many times I've tried crossing the street when I had the right of way, only to have some fucking cyclist almost motor right into me. This is particularly bad in Chelsea and the W. Village.

    Is NYC still the greatest city in the world? Certainly. Is NYC in better shape today than it was 10-15 years ago? No way.

    http://www.aolnews.com/crime/article/nyc-murder-rate-up-20-percent-so-far-in-2010/19417962

    http://www.nydailynews.com/blogs/dailypolitics/2010/09/nyc-budget-update-were-still-b.html

    http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/09/18/spokes-the-cyclist-pedestrian-wars/


    Rudy was a blowhard hypocritical idiot - who was annointed the second coming of Christ simply for doing what the hell he was elected to do.

    Koch was a turkey

    Bloomberg is da man
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    Oct 10, 2010 4:35 PM GMT
    I don't live in NYC, but I've been there often for work. Since my first visit there in 1989, NYC is a vastly better city in almost every way. Certainly much cleaner, more pedestrian friendly, and more aware of quality of life features. That the city is cognizant of quality of life problems and is doing something to improve things is good.

    As for complaints about the subway, I just can't imagine what ReppaT is talking about. I'll admit I've seen better subways systems (Barcelona is about the best) but as far as big city subways go, NYC's is really pretty good.
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    Oct 10, 2010 5:02 PM GMT
    Don't imagine, especially if you don't live here.

    The subways are a massive mess. Research the issues the MTA is having: the incredible number of delays we commuters have to put up with on a daily basis (and rising - hell, just last week my C train was delayed on Tues., Wed. and Fri - each time I had to take the 34th St. E to 42nd and transfer to the 1 or B), the crumbling infrastructure, rising rates for less services, crime on the rise in the subways, dirty cars, etc.

    We all know the subways likely won't end up in the state they were in throughout the 70's and 80's, but they're not any better off today than they were in the early 90's. I spend a lot of time on the trains, including NJ Transit and LIRR. All are suffering, and the subways are in approximately the same condition they were in when I first moved to NYC. They had an incredible run in the mid 90's to late 2000's, but not now.
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    Oct 10, 2010 5:31 PM GMT
    Whatever you say, Mr. Congeniality. Won't you run for mayor then? I imagine everyone in NYC wants everything to be the best in the world, but no one wants their taxes to go up. Sometimes you have to face political reality.
  • laxdude25

    Posts: 604

    Oct 10, 2010 5:38 PM GMT
    i am interested to hear what my "bias" is. i have lived in nyc over the same period of time that reppaT has and longer, am a city planner by education, and i simply find the quality of life and the fact that there is significant progress across most objective measurements of life quality in nyc. rudy was a very poor manager of the city, and created a lot of financial time bombs that are very difficult to defuse. the city is not perfect, and right now with the mta doing a massive amount of repair work the delays are huge. remember, the mta is NOT under city jurisdiction.
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    Oct 10, 2010 6:21 PM GMT
    It is all nice and good that NYC is trying to be a greener, pedestrian friendly city but there needs to be a focus on other issues too like... oh the Homeless for example!
    For the love of humanity, the U.S. is one of the most powerful and wealthy countries on the planet yet our homeless population is out of control.
    If we apparently care about our people then why are we letting them live on the streets?!

    Whatever...
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    Oct 10, 2010 6:27 PM GMT
    Dante_b saidIt is all nice and good that NYC is trying to be a greener, pedestrian friendly city but there needs to be a focus on other issues too like... oh the Homeless for example!
    For the love of humanity, the U.S. is one of the most powerful and wealthy countries on the planet yet our homeless population is out of control.
    If we apparently care about our people then why are we letting them live on the streets?!

    Whatever...

    Homelessness is a complex issue. Believe it or not, it's a lifestyle that some deliberately choose. You will never get those people off the streets.
  • laxdude25

    Posts: 604

    Oct 10, 2010 6:32 PM GMT
    Bloomberg actually has on one hand established a very and in some ways ambitious plan to create decent housing for the homeless. unfortunately, his dedication to the free market and redevelopment has also exacerbated the affordable housing crisis in some ways. my family is very involved with services to the mentally ill, as one of our relatives has severe mental illness. without the care of the extended family, she would probably be on the streets somewhere. homeless is a very tough issue, with few easy answers, and caused by a range of trends. In NYC, both official city policy and the work of non-profits is being directed at the problem, but can be overwhelmed by macro forces like the world economy. sorry, probably longer and dryer than most forum readers would like to hear.
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    Oct 10, 2010 6:38 PM GMT
    YES YES YES YES YES!!!

    Oh wait...the MetroCard went up..

    SHIT SHIT SHIT SHIT SHIT!!!!
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    Oct 10, 2010 6:45 PM GMT
    I'm very proud of NYC. It has become an even more wonderful and safer place than when I was a kid. Considering the number of people living in and visiting NYC, calling it an ideal place is within reason and reality. Considering the economic crises we are relatively fortunate to still have such a great place at our disposal.
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    Oct 10, 2010 6:45 PM GMT
    laxdude25 saidBloomberg actually has on one hand established a very and in some ways ambitious plan to create decent housing for the homeless. unfortunately, his dedication to the free market and redevelopment has also exacerbated the affordable housing crisis in some ways. my family is very involved with services to the mentally ill, as one of our relatives has severe mental illness. without the care of the extended family, she would probably be on the streets somewhere. homeless is a very tough issue, with few easy answer, and caused by a range of trends. In NYC, both official city policy and the work of non-profits is being directed at the problem, but can be overwhelmed by macro forces like the world economy. sorry, probably longer and dryer than most forum readers would like to hear.


    As a volunteer with both Partnership with the Homeless and NYC Cares' what you are saying here isn't true.

    Bloomie's solution was basically to close as many city sponsored homeless orgs as possible and give those who wanted a one way ticket out of the city.
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    Oct 10, 2010 6:48 PM GMT
    Global_Citizen said
    Dante_b said[...]
    Homelessness is a complex issue. Believe it or not, it's a lifestyle that some deliberately choose. You will never get those people off the streets.


    Yes, homelessness IS a complex issue.
    If people "choose" that "lifestyle" it is only because of their mental instability or dire economic straits.
  • laxdude25

    Posts: 604

    Oct 10, 2010 6:58 PM GMT
    with all due respect to black guy 4 you, i just want to say that you can have similar experiences and have different conclusions. i have volunteered with partnership for the homeless and midnight run, and fountain house and i disagree that the bloomberg administration essentially has a "buy them a ticket out of the city" policy. but i would be delighted to take the debate offline, even meet in person. homelessness is a very tough issue, and sound bites don't do it justice.
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    Oct 10, 2010 7:14 PM GMT
    Global_Citizen said
    Homelessness is a complex issue. Believe it or not, it's a lifestyle that some deliberately choose. You will never get those people off the streets.


    icon_eek.gif

    Keyword: some

    In reality, few choose to be homeless, and most would prefer to have a roof over their heads.

    Your sweeping generalizations on this issue are disturbing.
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    Oct 10, 2010 7:48 PM GMT
    I've been visiting New York for my entire life as I have family there and I'm moving there this week. I visited two weeks ago to do a dry run. Overall- I like how NYC is trying to become the greenest city and they seem to be progressing.

    The bike lanes were clearly marked in green and were widened. An improvement over the old ones. Much of Broadway is pedestrianized also. While I miss all the traffic and the old NYC, seeing street planters and workers lounging in the street during their lunch break was refreshing. It kind of reminded me of European plazas.

    The subway was quick, clean (yes, of the many lines I rode everyday the subway cars were mostly clean and had relatively new cars) and the system was easier than expected to navigate. Lots of places for free transfers between lines.

    I'm moving from Chicago so my perception of the NYC subway being this way may be in part to me having to ride the dirty and slow CTA el. In my opinion public transit in Chicago is at least 20 years behind NYC. Don't even get me started on how Chicago is run.

    I felt safe in every borough even some parts of the Bronx. NYC is still the safest major city in the country.

    The Highline is an amazing addition to the city as is the West Side bike path.

    The only changes I don't really like are all the condos that went up in the past years but from where I'm moving from NYC seems to be improving.

    Now if we can get rid of bedbugs and lower the rents but overall I'm happy with New York the way it is.