Question about professional cyclists and lubing on the go

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 11, 2010 3:37 AM GMT
    Hey all,

    I hope this doesn't offend anyone, but I heard something that I wanted confirmed by some cycling fans. Someone I know said that, in major cycling marathons like the Tour de France, a serious contender will have a member of their pit crew ride up on a motorcycle and lube up the rider's undercarriage so they don't have to stop. Is that true? I'm sorry if it sounds ridiculous. It seems somewhat plausible but I can't find any mention of it on the Internet. I would appreciate any info anyone can provide.

    Thanks.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 11, 2010 12:12 PM GMT
    What on earth are you talking about? Lubing the bike while it is moving? Or something else?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 11, 2010 12:48 PM GMT
    "Lubing a rider's undercarriage" does sound a bit double entendre, especially since I never heard the automobile term undercarriage applied to a pedal bicycle. The only thing to lube is the chain, these road bikes having no suspension, while the wheel and crank bearing assemblies require disassembly for greasing.

    Furthermore, there'd likely be a problem with chain lube flinging off and getting on the rims & tires. Chain lubrication is more than just dabbing on some oil: encrusted dirt should first be removed, or else you're creating an abrasive paste that consumes energy and wears parts. Then the oil needs time to penetrate into the bearing surfaces, and finally the excess wiped off, to limit fling.

    I have a special dual spinning brush device in a closed case, to clean my chain and apply new lubricant. A process that's done while the bike is upside down at home, or clamped into a service jig, first using a liquid degreaser, and then applying a special fast-drying Teflon lube with high cling properties. You just don't squirt some 3-in-1 oil from a can onto a chain that costs more than many people's entire bicycle does!

    Last, sanctioned races have very strict rules about escort & chase vehicles allowed on the route. Even the official motorcycle escorts that render traffic and crowd control are kept to a minimum, though sometimes even these have tangles with the riders.

    I just can't imagine motorcycles with rider & passenger darting in and out of packs of riders (the chain is only accessible on the bike's right-hand side) and jabbing at them with an oily dauber on a pole, that could easily get jammed in the gears, or cause the chain to derail. And with today's hi-tech lubes, not something really needed anyway during daily stages in most cases.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 11, 2010 2:51 PM GMT
    you actually meant to lube their ass and crotch ? lol
    i never heard of it but possibly it happens.

    normally each stage of the Tour lasts around 5 hours .
    If you put a chamois cream beforehand you normally would be good for the whole ride.
    But in extreme heat, or if the rider suffers from boils ( it happens frequently), possibly someone form the team might come and apply a medicated ointment to prevent infection.

    as for the bike itself, the technician will prepare the bike prior to the race and then it's good for the ride.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 11, 2010 7:29 PM GMT
    body glide Pictures, Images and Photos
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 11, 2010 7:50 PM GMT
    3113333672_0c38c268bb_z.jpg?zz=1
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 11, 2010 8:03 PM GMT
    TheProduct said3113333672_0c38c268bb_z.jpg?zz=1

    LMAO!!!!
    my oh my!!!!! i want one for xmas!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 11, 2010 9:50 PM GMT
    GuerrillaSodomite saidbody glide Pictures, Images and Photos


    meh,that's no fun .. wouldn't you prefer to smear the stuff on a sweaty little tight ass/crotch with your own hands ?

    --

    love the dildo, in fact when climbing a steep trail on a mtbike , you have to position your asshole against the tip of the saddle and sit on it to keep a down pressure on the rear wheel while also preventing the front wheel from lifting up.
    feels like a dildo, except it's really not very pleasant.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 12, 2010 4:53 AM GMT
    Thanks for the replies. I apologize for not being more clear. I did mean the ass and crotch, hehehe. He likes to ride his bikes around the city and such but he's not a competitive cyclist or anything. He said guys with motorcycles would come by for riders on the Tour de France, the rider would pull down their biker shorts and the guy would apply the lube). I dunno it sounds implausible, I mean you could just as well peddle standing up and apply it yourself I guess? Anyway it kind of cracked me up, I just wanted to ask some cyclers if that is what goes down cos I couldn't find any mention of it on the Internet.
  • FredMG

    Posts: 988

    Oct 12, 2010 5:22 AM GMT
    gp442 saidHey all,

    I hope this doesn't offend anyone, but I heard something that I wanted confirmed by some cycling fans. Someone I know said that, in major cycling marathons like the Tour de France, a serious contender will have a member of their pit crew ride up on a motorcycle and lube up the rider's undercarriage so they don't have to stop. Is that true? I'm sorry if it sounds ridiculous. It seems somewhat plausible but I can't find any mention of it on the Internet. I would appreciate any info anyone can provide.

    Thanks.


    Serious "dyed-in-the-wool, hard core road cyclists" do, in fact:

    - shave their legs.and up to the waist in some cases. (the old wives tale is for aerodynamics, but it helps from getting infected hairs when they crash)

    - apply lube to their crotch/short's pad. On long rides I've used Bag Balm and/or Butt Butter, and there are others.

    As far as lubing on the fly, it sounds impractical, and improbably, a good lubing in the morning will get you at least 120 miles. I've never ridden farther than that but it wasn't because the lube was failing at the end of the day.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 12, 2010 5:26 AM GMT

    When I do rides lasting more than a day, or more than two centuries a week, we "lube" up the bit between the ass and balls so that it doesn't hurt so much on the seat after a while. We apply a bit of Vaseline to the sensitive areas that will be rubbing on a bike seat for 8 or 9 hours straight.

    I bet you heard some version of that which morphed into something completely wrong.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 12, 2010 3:22 PM GMT
    shyshortguy said
    When I do rides lasting more than a day, or more than two centuries a week, we "lube" up the bit between the ass and balls so that it doesn't hurt so much on the seat after a while. We apply a bit of Vaseline to the sensitive areas that will be rubbing on a bike seat for 8 or 9 hours straight.

    I bet you heard some version of that which morphed into something completely wrong.
    That's what I was thinking. I always lubed up for the century rides, but never had anyone do the lubing for me. Although, that would have been welcomed. icon_biggrin.gif
  • rnch

    Posts: 11524

    Oct 12, 2010 3:31 PM GMT
    TheProduct said3113333672_0c38c268bb_z.jpg?zz=1


    so THIS must explain why so many guys in my gay-friendly neighborhood are smiling as they slowly pedal by on their bicycles! icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 12, 2010 3:46 PM GMT
    paulflexes saidI always lubed up for the century rides, but never had anyone do the lubing for me. Although, that would have been welcomed. icon_biggrin.gif

    I do the same for longer rides. I keep this on my bike, lube before I start and can reapply during personal pit stops. A rider doesn't need his ass swabbed on the go.

    This version is like a deodorant stick, you just wipe it on your crotch and balls. Women apply it under their breasts, too, more commonly done when it's a running event rather than biking for them. Some also put it under their arms, again more typically for runners rather than bicyclists.

    It should also be noted that biker road shorts have a cushion pad in the crotch, known as a "chamois" that reduces discomfort there, as well. So when you see these super-small, narrow & hard bike saddles, the rider does have some additional padding for his or her ass.

    IMG_0153.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 12, 2010 9:43 PM GMT
    Haha funny stuff in here.

    Couple things.

    Protour bike chains are replaced fairly frequently and the factory lube is pretty good stuff. But since the bikes are routinely washed after a day of racing (sometimes even power-washed), they do get a wipe down then the chain is relubed and wiped dry of the lube the night before. This gives the lube time to penetrate and the volatile parts a chance to evaporate. Generally once a chain is pulled from a bike it gets discarded and a new one is put back on. (They don't use quick links on their chains.)

    The lubes are often custom mixes of the mechanics, and get thicker (more viscous) on rainy/dusty/grimy days in the saddle. Sometimes you will see a rider getting a squirt of lube on a chain from a team car. This is fairly common, especially in big races.

    A dirty chain is rarely cleaned with a degreaser as this will dissolve the factory grease that is inside the rollers. If a chain is that dirty and cannot be surface wiped clean, generally it will be replaced.

    Power washing your bikes is Not recommended, btw. This is done for sponsors and to make things look good, and plus these bikes are frequently broken down and rebuilt/re-lubed, especially the BB bearings and the headsets.

    As to chamois cream. Some guys are sensitive to saddle sores, most not so much. When you put the amount of miles these guys do in the saddle, you sort of get used to it after years and years. Sure every once in a while a hot streak of days will happen and you sweat a lot, or you forget to wear a clean set of bibs and you get an infection, or it just happens, but it is not the norm. The problem with a saddle sore is once you get one, it is hard to get rid of it...you have to keep the area super clean and as dry as possible. But yet during the day, you are sweating in your chamois, abrading the area, and just generally not letting it/them heal. The best way is to prevent them in the first place. Chamois cream is really for occasional riders who are not used to the miles and get chaffing issues. Chaffing is not so much the issue for pros, as I said, they are used to it, it is more the long term (5-8 hours a day) exposure to bacteria/sweat infested chamois. Riders tend to be very particular about their bibs: they must be clean and fresh. While I no longer race, I would never think to own just one or two sets of bibs for daily riding. I also get a kick about guys who complain about sores, yet wash their one set of bibs in the shower or something! They need to be properly washed to kill all the nasties that try to make home in chamois.

    As to the story of applying chamois cream in that fashion, no way, doesn't happen as far as I am aware, nor have I ever heard a story about it ever happening.


  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 13, 2010 2:43 AM GMT
    Ah, all right. Yeah maybe I misheard him, we were seated at a somewhat crowded table at a restaurant. Anyway, thanks for the replies. I kind of am built like a pregnant woman, so I'm not really into biking so much. But it seems like a fun thing to do. Rock on!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 13, 2010 2:47 AM GMT
    I think that what TheProduct has posted would prevent most thieves from stealing the Trek bicycle in that photo...they'd be too afraid to walk around with the blue dildo until they could get the bike home to replace the missing seat.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 14, 2010 6:05 PM GMT
    you mean there's no such thing as a gay bike thief ?