Anyone Experienced with Blue Screen Messages?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 11, 2010 11:04 PM GMT
    I had never gotten any blue screens in the past but some reason my new computer is making my windows OS to crash 2 minutes after booting up. The blue screen message before the shutdown(oh yeah I can read that fast) just simply says there could be a hardware installation problem....but it doesnt tell me what specific component is triggering it. Are blue screens usually related to the microprocessor? memory? bios? network adapters? all of the above? I just itsnt the main board.

    EDIT:

    Motherboard P7P55D PRO
    Processor Intel Core i7 860
    Memory Corsair XMS3 DDR3 2x2GB
    NVIDIA GFORCE GTX460(PCI E of course)

    P7P55D_E_PRO_layout_L.jpg

    POST BLUE SCREEN MESSAGE

    postbs.png
  • trevchaser

    Posts: 237

    Oct 12, 2010 12:27 AM GMT
    Why are you using Windows Charlitos? icon_razz.gif

    I usually would try starting it in safe mode by pressing F8 repeatedly upon startup until I get the choice to boot that way. If safe mode still blue screens then I would take HD out if I need to backup files, then reinstall Windows.

    Now I have learned from Windows and also make two partitions. One small 60GB partition for Windows and all it's programs, then the rest of the harddrive to my user files. Then if Windows ever self destructed, I can reinstall or restore an image without my user files being toast.

    If you can get into safe mode, I'd click start, right click My Computer, click properties, then I can't remember where to go from there but you can choose to not reboot automatically on blue screen. Then you can snap a clear pic of that error code and google it!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 12, 2010 12:29 AM GMT
    are they any "beeps" during power up? these can tell you which component is loose based on the number of and length of beeps. My video card requires re-seating every few months and this what let's me know.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 12, 2010 12:34 AM GMT
    BSOD is often memory - have you installed anything new recently? software OR hardware?

    Get your computer running in safe mode (With Networking), go online and download memtest. (does this run in safe mode? i imagine it does..) and let it go for a few hours - it'll probably let you know if there's something wrong with your computer's RAM

    How much do you know about fiddling around with a computer? can you add/remove ram from it? You might want to try each ram stick one by one until you find the culprit (assuming RAM is your problem)

    However, before doing what trev said about a reformat (and before bothering to remove the Hard drive, which can be a pain..) try running a bootup of linux and move all of your files to an external hard drive etc before reformatting.

    Note a reformat may not solve your answer and the problem isn't necessarily windows (though it probably is) but the problem is most likely hardware, which would mean that a different OS, a new install of windows, and etc would NOT solve your issue in the long run

    if ya haven't a clue lemme know and i'll give it some real attntns icon_razz.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 12, 2010 1:10 AM GMT
    General rule of thumb.. After buying a new Windows computer, uninstall all the crapware that was installed on it. I'd have to say that a majority of BSOD and general slowness on a computer is due to the junk that gets installed by third parties.

    Boot into Safe Mode like everyone suggested. Go into Add/Remove programs and uninstall all the crapware. Also, try running a Windows Update afterward. Maybe there's an old driver conflict somewhere.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 12, 2010 2:07 AM GMT
    You said it's a new computer right?

    If it's new, I'd return it and get another one. Blue screens right after booting up are very very unusual, it looks like a manufacturer error.

    I hope you're still in the warranty period.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 12, 2010 2:24 AM GMT
    In my experience, with a new computer it's usually worth the small effort to reformat and create two partitions, a C: for the OS and D: for the data (someone else mentioned this above). That's standard practice for me (being an IT Admin and Network Engineer).

    Typically, I see BSODs being caused by RAM or video cards 90% of the time. But they're also caused by a faulty installation of the Windows system files. Doing a clean install with two partitions will probably be your best bet. But if you do that and still see the BSOD, look to see what the specific error is (it'll say "STOP 00X...... something). This can often help you diagnose what the exact problem is.

    But I'm guessing that a clean install will take care of the problem, and as an added bonus will help make troubleshooting a little easier in the future.
  • MarvelClimber

    Posts: 511

    Oct 12, 2010 2:26 AM GMT
    Btw, BSOD = Blue Screen Of Death, a term early Windows users have been familiar with. Windows isn't the culprit... it's the multitude of hardware vendors. By new computer, I'm assuming you mean out-of-the-box new, not refurbished. I would just copy your personal files to another medium and take it back to the store. No new computer should blue screen like that. If the return/exchange isn't an option then contact the manufacturer because all companies have at least a 1 year warranty on all parts. It's a state law just about everywhere.

    If you want help fixing it, we need more info.
    Which Windows version are you running?
    Did you install any new hardware while it was still bootable?
    Did you change any device drivers?
    Did you use Windows Update to upgrade device drivers?
    Is Windows Backup configured to run?
    Did the machine shut down unexpectedly, such as a power outtage?
    Did you try to make an image of the drive, or convert it to a virtual machine?

    Computer specs would help too, such as:
    Manufacturer & model
    CPU/Processor (like Intel Core i3 2.13GHz)
    RAM (ie 4GB)
    Bit length of Windows (32-bit or 64-bit?)

    You'll also want to record the error code on the blue screen. It'll look like something like 0x0000008E... a hex value. That will help in identifying the problem too.

    There's no point in reinstalling the OS until you figure out what the problem is. If it is hardware-related then the BSOD will likely occur again, or you could even damage the hard drive beyond repair.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 12, 2010 3:34 AM GMT
    k Guys sorry I didnt post a lot of required info to figure this out. Ok, first of all, I didnt buy any bundle(thats a total scam), I built my computer from scratch, I bought all the components separately and put them together. These are the specs

    Motherboard P7P55D PRO
    Processor Intel Core i7 860
    Memory Corsair XMS3 DDR3 2x2GB
    NVIDIA GFORCE GTX460(PCI E of course)

    I installed Windows 7 Home 64(it was cheaper icon_smile.gif ) . The computer has done this occasionally, usually if I stop using it for a few days. The first time it did this I took it back to the place I bought all the hardware from to get the hardware tested and inspected, they did so. The tested the PC for hours, pushing the processor and memory to its limits....nothing, no blue screen, they were not able to trigger that blue screen so they were not able to track down the issue. I brought it home and it worked just fine. Then I went to Montreal for a few days, came back and did the exact same thing.

    I assumed that probably was a lose part so i opened it up and pushed the memories and graphics card...it worked. I just left to Montreal again last week and when I came back same problem, the computer boots up, every program that I open up crashes: Chrome, SideBar, Explorer and then bam! blue screen. I tried to open it again and do the same thing but it did not work. After a few more tries playing with the hardware, it finally worked. However Im wondering if my network card is the one to blame, I almost got a feeling that everytime i make it work is not because I readjust the hardware but because I remove the link to the modem/router. However I havent been able to recreate the blue-screen again, its working like a charm now.

    PS: The PC gives me one beep on boot. The LED near the memory slots that says MemOk turns red and then turns back off after the beep.

    P7P55D_E_PRO_layout_L.jpg
  • Celticmusl

    Posts: 4330

    Oct 12, 2010 3:35 AM GMT
    I have a mac, I haven't seen a blue screen in years.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 12, 2010 4:00 AM GMT
    charlitos saidI had never gotten any blue screens in the past but some reason my new computer is making my windows OS to crash 2 minutes after booting up. The blue screen message before the shutdown(oh yeah I can read that fast) just simply says there could be a hardware installation problem....but it doesnt tell me what specific component is triggering it. Are blue screens usually related to the microprocessor? memory? bios? network adapters? all of the above? I just itsnt the main board.



    Read the blue screen, Little One. It will give a stop code. Take that stop code and search M$ for it. That will get you pointed down the right path.

    Blue screens are a system stop for any of a number of reasons. Almost always it's a video driver issue, but, sometimes, it will be a sound driver, or some other device driver.

    Do a safe mode boot. If that works, do a safe mode with network boot. If that works, do a Last Known Good. You might be able to do a restore, but, often, a Last Known Good will do the trick.
  • MarvelClimber

    Posts: 511

    Oct 12, 2010 4:01 AM GMT
    Do you have a sufficient power supply? Did you calculate the wattage correctly for all connected components... including power-over-x devices?

    Also check your BIOS settings:
    Do you have hyperthreading enabled?
    Did you check the memory settings to make sure the latency is set correctly?

    Since your NIC is on your board, you can try disabling it in the BIOS. See if that works. It's possible you got a faulty board. I can't say for sure, but this sounds more like a memory problem.


    Btw, if you have a .edu email, or have a friend that's a student, you can get Windows 7 Professional for just $29.99. Since it has an Anytime Upgrade, you just enter the new product key to unlock the new features. The Pro version helps with networking.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 12, 2010 4:27 AM GMT
    HisAlterEgo saidDo you have a sufficient power supply? Did you calculate the wattage correctly for all connected components... including power-over-x devices?

    Also check your BIOS settings:
    Do you have hyperthreading enabled?
    Did you check the memory settings to make sure the latency is set correctly?

    Since your NIC is on your board, you can try disabling it in the BIOS. See if that works. It's possible you got a faulty board. I can't say for sure, but this sounds more like a memory problem.


    Btw, if you have a .edu email, or have a friend that's a student, you can get Windows 7 Professional for just $29.99. Since it has an Anytime Upgrade, you just enter the new product key to unlock the new features. The Pro version helps with networking.


    I have Windows 7 Professional on 2 other PCs here at home(I got it with my student email), I cant use the same serials on my new computer and the promotion seems no longer available for my student email address.

    My power supply is a Thermaltake TR2 600W. That should be enough.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 12, 2010 4:49 AM GMT
    Normally, you won't see a power supply issue cause a blue screen. The system may just stop if the power supply isn't working right, but, Windows won't do a stop based upon power.

    Normally, as well, you won't hear BIOS beep codes for something that will cause a blue screen. BIOS beep codes are when hardware changes or isn't right, or something prevents the bootstrap.

    Use the stop code on the blue screen. You can read your motherboard literature if you're getting bios beep codes. Consult your event viewer for stop diagnostic information as well.

    If the system doesn't blue screen on every start, then you might have a USB device / driver that is triggering the event. If a USB driver consumes too much bandwidth, or tries to get into something it shouldn't, you'll see intermittent stops.

    Use the various codes, events, and some keen observations to see what's doing it.

    USB camera drivers are sometimes TERRIBLE about blue screens; especially Yahoo Messenger.

    Some Logitech USB drivers crash and burn. Driver load sequence will cause a blue screen intermittent, sometimes, too.

    Newer versions of Windows have "self-healing" and will mark a driver bad / disable it after a few hits. I.e., Windows will sometimes fix itself.

    I don't know the internals of Windows, but, I think it will postpone driver load if it sees a consistent problem.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 12, 2010 4:59 AM GMT
    Celticmusl saidI have a mac, I haven't seen a blue screen in years.


    BSD has a kernel stop, and, they are very rare, indeed, particularly, on an Apple.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 12, 2010 5:01 AM GMT
    Update the BIOS.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 12, 2010 5:05 AM GMT
    Did you consider the possibility of some of your hardware being incompatible with the 64-bit OS?
  • sensible

    Posts: 40

    Oct 12, 2010 5:34 AM GMT
    simply take out your memory card, clean it and put it back in.. that will do the trick!

    You can do the same with your graphics card just to be double sure.
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    Oct 12, 2010 5:36 AM GMT
    Tazo995 saidDid you consider the possibility of some of your hardware being incompatible with the 64-bit OS?


    it is all new hardware designed to go along with the new Intel Core i7s, 64 bits compatibility is mandatory.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 12, 2010 5:37 AM GMT
    From the motherboard manual page 2-42:

    P7P55D PRO

    1 short beep

    VGA detected.
    Quick boot disabled
    No keyboard.

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    Oct 12, 2010 5:37 AM GMT
    xrichx saidUpdate the BIOS.


    the BIOS was upgraded the first time I had that blue screen, I thought that was what fixed the problem...until it happened again
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    Oct 12, 2010 5:40 AM GMT
    chuckystud saidFrom the motherboard manual page 2-42:

    P7P55D PRO

    1 short beep

    VGA detected.
    Quick boot disabled
    No keyboard.



    ya but im not getting a running beep and then a short beep. If I remove my keyboard then yes, I get a first beep and then a second short beep. If one of my memories isnt hooked correctly I get no beeping whatsoever.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 12, 2010 5:40 AM GMT
    sensible saidsimply take out your memory card, clean it and put it back in.. that will do the trick!

    You can do the same with your graphics card just to be double sure.


    done that a million times.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 12, 2010 5:44 AM GMT
    On the same page, 2-42, of your motherboard manual, you'll see the beep codes.

    1 long beep, then 2 short beeps, then repeated, means it's having trouble strapping memory.
  • maximumrisk

    Posts: 799

    Oct 12, 2010 5:44 AM GMT
    Last time I experienced something like that, it was because one of my DDR Ram chips was the culprit.

    I had 2, so I checked each one seperatly and since I eliminated the damaged one everything works fine.