How much sleep (need data)

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    Oct 16, 2010 1:22 PM GMT
    So I usually sleep 7-8 hours a night, but I've been lucky enough to take a 1-1.5 hour nap in the afternoon recently, usually right before a workout.
    I know this has probably been asked before, but is there any data (i.e. clinical trials in people) that actually test how much sleep is optimal for gaining weight?
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    Oct 16, 2010 2:19 PM GMT
    I heard this on the news this past week..........light at night causes weight gain...in mice, Good Luck!....http://www.businessweek.com/lifestyle/content/healthday/644120.html
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    Oct 16, 2010 3:27 PM GMT
    Since I've been off work, my sleep schedule has become so fucked I don't know whether it's night or day. I'm averaging 4 hrs of sleep twice a day, sometimes a 3rd nap of 1-2 hrs.
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    Oct 16, 2010 4:20 PM GMT
    Body building experts say 7 to 8. I try to get 8 to 9 as often as I can. Enough sleep helps your body heal and regrow a lot faster. It also keeps you looking younger as you get older. But being consistent is key.

    Go to bed at the same approximate time each night and wake up at the same approximate time each morning. The best sleep is during dark hours when there's no sun - but usually between 10:00 PM and 7:00 AM. Studies show that by approximately 10:00 PM the body begins to react to the lack of daylight and needs to be sleeping soon after that. I normally go to bed between 10:30 PM and 12:00 AM (midnight) and get up between 7:00 AM and 8:00 AM.

    Doing this regularly may help make the times when you are occasionally out late, a lot more fun because you'll have more stamina and endurance in general. But, after each time you've stayed out late the night or two before, get right back into the regular routine the next night.
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    Oct 16, 2010 11:36 PM GMT
    I'm not sure exactly what's optimal for body building, but I've done a lot of reading and research on sleep in general (former insomniac here), and I know that most people can function completely fine on a minimum of 5 1/2 hours a night. It might not seem like a lot, but you shouldn't experience any significant impairment in physical or mental functioning as long as you get at least 5 1/2 hours a night.

    Most people sleep closer to 6-7 hours... 8 or 9 is great but not necessary. In fact, anything beyond that and you're probably oversleeping.

    Most research suggests not working out within two or three hours of going to bed either, because you end up raising your heart rate and body temperature, which makes it more difficult for your body to fall (and stay) asleep.

    So yeah, I think you're probably getting ample sleep for muscle recovery and muscle building. :-)
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    Oct 17, 2010 2:08 PM GMT
    I'm probably a weird case, but I sleep 9-11 hours whenever I'm lifting and eating hard. Any less than that and I feel wiped out and sore. If I'm cutting, I usually sleep 5-6 hours. Might be due to the extra caffeine though.

    I just try to avoid using an alarm clock and sleep whatever my body wants.

    Most research says people who sleep less live longer, and people who sleep more function and heal better. It's a trade-off, but I tend to have the "live fast/die young" mindset anyway.
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    Oct 17, 2010 2:36 PM GMT
    I've heard that lack of sleep can make it easier to store body fat, but I doubt that is the type of weight gain that you are seeking.
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    Oct 17, 2010 7:55 PM GMT
    sashaman saidI've heard that lack of sleep can make it easier to store body fat, but I doubt that is the type of weight gain that you are seeking.


    Most stressors on the body, lack of sleep included, trigger survival responses from our organism, retention of body fat being one of them.