Sunblock. Bleh.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 06, 2008 5:47 PM GMT
    Hate the stuff, but not dumb enough to convince myself I don't need to start using it. Heard plenty about how I'm going to look ten years older and get cancer and all that nasty.
    My question is about how to pick and use the stuff- how important is the SPF, does it affect your tan (probably the basis of my post), does it have to go everywhere or just where you burn, etc.
    Thanks to mom's genes, I don't really sunburn (gotta work for it), but I'm told I still need it as much as the next guy - that true?

    Getting warm enough that I'm gonna be in the sun a lot more soon, just covering my ass =) Thanks, all.icon_cool.gif
  • MikePhilPerez

    Posts: 4357

    Mar 06, 2008 6:19 PM GMT
    Yes, you do need it. In my opinion you should use the highest factor you can get. Yes, I believe it does affect your tan, but tanned skin is damaged skin. If you want a tan, I think it's safer get it from a bottle.

    Sorry to sound so negative about it, but I have had skin cancer. On a sunny day, I cant go out doors without putting it on my face and hands. I keep the rest covered. And yes, I hate the stuff also.

    Mike
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    Mar 06, 2008 6:31 PM GMT
    Rats.
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    Mar 06, 2008 7:53 PM GMT
    Living in a sunny place like Arizona or Florida, it is very important to protect your skin. I know plenty of people who have had melanoma, and I've met a lot of people my own age that look MUCH older. I hate sunblock too, and I try to avoid being outdoors whenever possible, but when I do go out to hike or whatever, I make sure that I'm always covered with the highest SPF sunblock on all the exposed parts of my body.
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    Mar 06, 2008 9:07 PM GMT
    Mike,

    I'm in Florida, too, and the easiest for me is a spray product.

    You and I know that, in Florida, on a hot day, the LAST thing you want to do is rub some kind of cream or lotion on, and then put on clothes or try to go to work. It just makes you a slimy, sweaty, greasy, coconut-smelling mess. So I eventually just QUIT using anything because I DESPISE the feeling of cream or lotion on my skin, ESPECIALLY in hot weather. Blech!

    So, I started using a couple of good spray products that are waterproof. They mist on, even the face (eyes closed please), and dry almost instantly. Not stick or slimy at all. It really makes something that was previously unbearable very tolerable.

    I like BananaBoat's "Quick Dry" spray product (it's in an orange pump-spray bottle), and Coppertone's "Sport" spray product (in a blue/gray metal aerosol can). Both are great, but I tend to think the BananaBoat is a better deal. You get more and it feels SO dry going on. They are both SPF 30, so they offer good protection.

    Just something to think about. I hated using sunblock because of the application. This makes it so much easier to do. After taking a shower, dry off, step back in the tub and spray a fine mist all over, step out, and you're ready to dress. No waiting for gloppy lotion to dry.

    Being in Florida, I know you can find these in your grocery store any time of the year.

    Banaboat's product:

    http://www.drugstore.com/qxp87613_333181_sespider/banana_boat/sunblock_spray_quick_dry_sport_spf_30.htm

    Coppertone's product:

    http://www.amazon.com/Coppertone-Sport-Continuous-Spray-Sunblock/dp/B000FFBY3M
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    Mar 06, 2008 10:09 PM GMT
    I highly recommend La Roche-Posay. It's a French sunblock that is considered the best sunscreen available in the world. Of course, it's not sold in the USA, but if you're anywhere in Europe, especially at the airport, I recommend picking up several tubes. It's not cheap averaging $35-50 a bottle, but it works, especially for me as a Vietnamese, I tan very quickly and it also helps prevent me from getting too dark.

    Here's a bit more info:

    http://beauty.about.com/od/sunscree1/tp/sunscreenstop.htm

    I think you can order it online.
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    Mar 07, 2008 1:57 AM GMT
    woah, thanks guys, that's a lot more constructive than I'd expected... I'm going to pick up some of that spray stuff tomorrow, probably, and check it out. Might wait on the fifty-dollar sunblock for now, but thanks =)

    note - today, they day I posted this, my stupid ass went out for too long, and now my back is all red. duhhhhhhh...
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    Mar 07, 2008 3:13 AM GMT
    I am an avid user of sun block. I wear it every day. Simply love the stuff icon_smile.gif

    I am not sure how wearing sun block would affect one's tan (I have a natural tan, lol).

    But I use sun block for it's "anti-aging" attributes (UV light from the sun damages the skin). I, like others who have responded, live in the Sun Shine State.

    Wearing sun block alone is quite uncomfortable. Hence, I use the half-and-half method. I combine sun block with my Jergens lotion. I think combining sun block with a more normal lotion is the key.
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    Mar 07, 2008 8:54 PM GMT
    bigbluefanindc saidI highly recommend La Roche-Posay. It's a French sunblock that is considered the best sunscreen available in the world. Of course, it's not sold in the USA, but if you're anywhere in Europe, especially at the airport, I recommend picking up several tubes. It's not cheap averaging $35-50 a bottle, but it works, especially for me as a Vietnamese, I tan very quickly and it also helps prevent me from getting too dark.

    Here's a bit more info:

    http://beauty.about.com/od/sunscree1/tp/sunscreenstop.htm

    I think you can order it online.


    Are you talking about the Anthelios? From the reading I've done that's the best available because it blocks the UV rays completely but it's not easy to get and very expensive.

    I put on sunblock every day even in the winter. I agree with Novembermike, it's a pain to use but very rarely does a day go buy that I don't at least have it on my face, neck, ears and arms.
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    Mar 12, 2008 5:32 AM GMT
    eh here in Colorado, we are told that anything over SPF of 30 does about the same work, so if you put on 65 you still have to reapply it. In all honesty you could use SPF 4 if you wanted. SPF is thought to be a calculation of it's strength against the sun, but from what i've been told by the dermatologist is that it's more of a number of how long it lasts. For example, one application of SPF 4 will do just as much protection SPF 30, but the 4 will have to be reapplied every 30 minutes (not sure if that's the "real" time but it gives the idea) where as the single coat of 30 will last an hour (again probably not the "real" time but it shows the point). so it's all about how many times you want the hot guy at the beach to be rubbin your back.
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    May 29, 2008 1:04 AM GMT
    Sunscreen is super important guys!

    I work in medicine and see its damage all the time. Right now on my service is a 34 y/o female (fair-skinned) with malignant melanoma...she is cachectic and wasting and dying from it...it's sad , as in many cases such a situation could be prevented.

    TheycallmeRED was right. SPF is mostly a "time" thing. Say you burn after 30 min sun exposure. If you pile on some SPF 10, you'll burn after a theoretical 300 minutes. If you piled on SPF 2, you'll burn after 60 min. Unless of course you get the hot guy to reapply it icon_smile.gif

    UV-B light does the most damage to our skin, but try to find some sunscreen with zinc oxide as it covers the also damaging UV-A spectrum.

    PROTECT YOUR SKIN! Stay healthy and vain/beautiful/elastic. hahaha

    -J
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    May 29, 2008 1:46 AM GMT
    SPF measures resistance to UVB (mnemonic = "burning") rays, but aging (wrinkles and brown spots) are caused by UVA (mnemonic = "aging").

    La Roche-Posay Anthelios (which has Mexoryl for UVA absorbion) is great, yet it's hard to find in higher SPF in the US.

    Neutrogena Helioplex combines two chemical sunscreens (Avobenzone and Oxybenzone) that absorb UVA and UVB rays, is now available up to 85 SPF, and is available in many different forms (spray, oil-free, etc.)

    An alternative to chemical sunscreens like Anthelios and Helioplex is zinc oxide, which reflects the UV rays instead of absorbing them. (Titanium dixoide also reflects UV rays, but isn't as good at reflecting UVA as zinc oxide.)

    For your face, a good alternative to liquid sunscreens are mineral bronzers, like HE minerals: http://www.heminerals.com

    Reapply every 2 hours, even for high SPF sunscreen, or you'll end up sunburned like I was at the end of a weekend snow hike:
    not-enough-sunscreen.jpg
    (It was much worse the next day!)

    Wear sunglasses to avoid squinting. An otherwise very hot guy in my climbing program looks much older than he is because he doesn't wear sunglasses on overcast days on the snow. The glare is bad, so he's always squinting.
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    May 29, 2008 2:08 AM GMT
    I was born and raised in Florida. When I was growing up, sun (including sunburn) was considered good for you. We wanted as much as we could get. Even blistering was merely a temporary nuisance, and as a towhead I burned quickly and severely. We'd (or our parents) would even apply baby oil to accentuate the burn. Well, we eventually got smarter, and I eventually lost chunks out of both shoulders and my nose. Nowadays, I don't go outside without sunscreen, factor 36. I personally use Bullfrog. It's more an alcohol based product, but has a spray version, which is much more easy and less messy to apply. I'm an avid golfer, and always wear a male version of an Easter bonnet, in addition to the sunscreen.
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    May 29, 2008 4:46 PM GMT
    coming from a new lifeguard who works in the sun with no shelter or shade for 8 hours a day...pleeaassseeee put on sunscreen dude, i got the worst sunburn ever on my forehead the other day and its quite embarrassing, luckily its gone now, but thats a mistake ill never make again, i even put it on, but it wasnt a high enough SPF
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    May 29, 2008 5:06 PM GMT
    i use some coppertone spray stuff... cause i hate the lotiony goop. But i got to... a lot of money invested in my skin! Gotta protect the ink!
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    May 29, 2008 5:27 PM GMT
    Don't do the dumb thing I did a couple of years ago. I was at the beach and all my exposed skin was covered with sunscreen. A while later I decided to change suits and forgot that the second suit was about 3/4" lower in the back. So I ended up with a "racing stripe" (fortunately although it got red it wasn't so burnt that it peeled).
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    May 29, 2008 5:30 PM GMT
    Bullfrog does a good spray on sunblock too. In fact, I have to get some of that, as I'm out.

    This from a guy who burns upon thinking of the sun.
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    May 29, 2008 6:00 PM GMT
    i've rarely ever used sunscreen. :-/ but my skin is still very nice. the majority of damage is due to ... *ahem* accidents :-D well, just one really. a drinking glass shattered around my hand while i was washing it and avulsed several flaps, some are still slightly visible.

    do mind however, while i haven't used it much and i know that i should, i do use moisturizer often.

    for those of you that burn(ed), keep the following in mind for the future:

    if you burn enough to get red, immediately start an aspirin regimen at normal dose for the next 24-48 hours. not only does it significantly diminish the pain as expected but it almost entirely halts the burning reaction which means no peeling.

    second, if you do get to the peel stage, take an anti-histamine (anti-allergy) while going thru the peel process. that's what the itching is - a histamine flare. 'tis why hot showers make a sunburned person utterly miserable, heat increases the histamine response.

    third, moisturize frequently with skin healing lotion and remember that too much lotion is just wasted lotion and messes up your clothing.

    sunburns become a very trivial thing. but you shouldn't get so much sun that you burn in the first place. ;)
  • auryn

    Posts: 2061

    May 29, 2008 6:44 PM GMT
    IMO the products from Osmotics are the best. Not only do they have regular claims, but they back those claims with double-blind studies and show their clinical studies so you can see for yourself.

    I'd recommend their sun screen and Kinetin which is clinically proven to reduce sun damage.

    Everyone, even those of us that were blessed with more melinin, should use some type of sunscreen.
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    May 29, 2008 6:57 PM GMT
    I can have a sunburn after fifteen minutes. Can someone recommend a good, heavy-duty sunblock that is not a designer brand and also not greasy? (I don't trust the spray-on type for some reason.) I bought some Neutrogena "Age Shield FACE" sunblock with an SPF 55, because it has "Helioplex." It goes on thick and white and unfortunately stays that way. It creates kind of a "Goth" look.

    I've also seen some zinc oxide creams that supposedly go on clear. Do these work?
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    Jun 05, 2008 8:20 AM GMT
    Clear zinc oxide sunscreen? Yes, one of the benefits of nanotechnology is milling zinc oxide into 25 nanometer particles which block UV A, B, and C but allow visible light. The micronized zinc oxide that most people are familiar with is 125+ nanometers, and blocks visible light, leading to the pasty white look.

    I've been searching for a great, all natural and organic daily moisturizer with SPF 30 that goes on clear, and I've found it in Keys Solar RX. http://www.keys-soap.com/solarrx.html Consumer Reports even rated it first for "non water resistant sunscreens" based on its UV A and UV B blocking. (For a sweat and waterproof sunscreen, I recommend UV Natural SPF 30+. They avoid the white color by tinting it with iron oxides, but that means you really can't wear a white shirt or it will get on your clothes around your neck and you'll have to wash it to get the tan color off your clothes.)

    UV Natural is cheap and available at Whole Foods. Keys has some distributors, but I had to buy mine off their website. Considering the quality of their ingredients, it's a fair price at $26.95.

    Full disclosure: I don't work for either company; I work for an independent skin care and cosmetic treatment website (http://www.realself.com) and I occasionally blog at http://www.realself.com/blog/antioxidant-addict