Immigrating to the US.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Oct 19, 2010 1:12 AM GMT
    Anyone here immigrated to the US from Canada and got citizenship? How was the process? How expensive was it? Any pitfalls or hurdles to avoid? Any help you be a blessing.
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    Oct 19, 2010 2:45 AM GMT
    The easiest way is if you have skills that are in big demand.. ie nurse, doctor, teacher. US hospitals and state boards of education are always recruiting in Canada.
    That way doesn't cost you anything, the hospital or board pays all expenses and often times bonuses for signing on.
    Not sure about paramedics, maybe.
    Or you could enlist in the US forces
    Or you have a lot of money and plan on opening a business that will employ US citizens.
    If you don't have a skill that is in demand that can't easily be filled by US citizens then basically all you can do is apply for citizenship and see what happens.
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    Oct 19, 2010 6:15 AM GMT
    I didn't migrate from Canada (I migrated from Mexico), but I imagine the process is somewhat similar. Why don't you call the US consulate in Canada? I am sure they can give you some pointers on what to do. For me, it wasn't super expensive per se, but it was time consuming (it took like 7 yrs). I am sure it is way easier for Canadians, though.
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    Oct 19, 2010 6:18 AM GMT
    the nurse route is at a backlog right now, so, that might not be the best option at this point. unless you have an advanced degree in nursing (masters level minimum) it might expedite faster.
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    Oct 25, 2010 11:41 PM GMT
    well hopefully by next winter I will have completed my Journeyman's electrical course, so I'll be certified to do electrical in any category, with the option of opening a business. However I also wish to take a paramedic course following the conclusion of my electrical course. Kind of two plans are better than one sort of thing. I would have someone in FL who would be able to sponsor me and help me out if need be. I'm hopefully going down to the states in the summer so I'm sure I will call the consulate in Canada and get info from them, as well as search out the job market in FL when I am down there. Hopefully by then the economy is on the right track and things will be easier to gauge. Im just looking for pointers right now because it all seems very confusing to me.
  • laguna07

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    Oct 26, 2010 12:06 AM GMT
    Would forget about the paramedic route. Normally paramedics are firemen that have special training/education for that specialty. And there are long waits to become firemen in most larger cities.
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    Oct 26, 2010 12:11 AM GMT
    Whatever you're gonna do, settle in for the long haul.

    The US immigration system is even more dysfunctional than most other government institutions. Even with all the right credentials and sponsorship, it's still a very time consuming process.

    It seems like the system has been designed around discouragement.

    Good luck man!
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    Oct 26, 2010 12:35 AM GMT
    Tazo995 saidWhatever you're gonna do, settle in for the long haul.

    The US immigration system is even more dysfunctional than most other government institutions. Even with all the right credentials and sponsorship, it's still a very time consuming process.

    It seems like the system has been designed around discouragement.

    Good luck man!


    It may be difficult to get in if you're from another developed country, otherwise it seems pretty easy.
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    Oct 26, 2010 1:11 AM GMT
    Jonno11 saidwell hopefully by next winter I will have completed my Journeyman's electrical course, so I'll be certified to do electrical in any category, with the option of opening a business. However I also wish to take a paramedic course following the conclusion of my electrical course. Kind of two plans are better than one sort of thing. I would have someone in FL who would be able to sponsor me and help me out if need be. I'm hopefully going down to the states in the summer so I'm sure I will call the consulate in Canada and get info from them, as well as search out the job market in FL when I am down there. Hopefully by then the economy is on the right track and things will be easier to gauge. Im just looking for pointers right now because it all seems very confusing to me.

    If you are going to be in the electrical trade, learn Spanish. Just saying.
  • beaujangle

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    Oct 26, 2010 1:37 AM GMT
    It may be difficult to get in if you're from another developed country, otherwise it seems pretty easy. [/quote]


    What do you mean? So America mainly takes people from the 3rd world?
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    Oct 26, 2010 8:59 AM GMT
    Tazo995 saidWhatever you're gonna do, settle in for the long haul.

    The US immigration system is even more dysfunctional than most other government institutions. Even with all the right credentials and sponsorship, it's still a very time consuming process.

    It seems like the system has been designed around discouragement.

    Good luck man!


    It is so badly dysfunctional that it harms the country...
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    Oct 26, 2010 9:02 AM GMT
    Why do you want to become an American citizen? The grass isn't greener here.
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    Nov 04, 2010 2:40 AM GMT
    on the contrary, for me the grass wud be very much greener in the form of an adorable young child and a loving partner. and i might have found a loophole in the laws already that wud allow me to go down there no questions asked, other than a judge to sign off, so here's hoping once my training up here is done, i can hop in my truck and be Florida bound.
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    Nov 04, 2010 3:08 AM GMT
    reppaT saidWhy do you want to become an American citizen? The grass isn't greener here.


    Oh yes it is. I'd chop off my pinky finger for it. And I'm sure I'm not the only one, but coming to the US is my one big dream.
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    Nov 04, 2010 3:09 AM GMT
    mocktwinkie said
    Tazo995 saidWhatever you're gonna do, settle in for the long haul.

    The US immigration system is even more dysfunctional than most other government institutions. Even with all the right credentials and sponsorship, it's still a very time consuming process.

    It seems like the system has been designed around discouragement.

    Good luck man!


    It may be difficult to get in if you're from another developed country, otherwise it seems pretty easy.


    It might seem that way because a lot of people from 3rd world countries get in through family.

    But no, nothing in the US immigration system is "pretty easy"
  • beaujangle

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    Nov 04, 2010 3:11 AM GMT
    Tazo995 said
    reppaT saidWhy do you want to become an American citizen? The grass isn't greener here.


    Oh yes it is. I'd chop off my pinky finger for it. And I'm sure I'm not the only one, but coming to the US is my one big dream.



    I'm curious, what's your fascination of coming to the US? I have mine but what's yours?
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    Nov 04, 2010 3:15 AM GMT
    Lostboy said
    Tazo995 saidWhatever you're gonna do, settle in for the long haul.

    The US immigration system is even more dysfunctional than most other government institutions. Even with all the right credentials and sponsorship, it's still a very time consuming process.

    It seems like the system has been designed around discouragement.

    Good luck man!


    It is so badly dysfunctional that it harms the country...



    It sure does and in additional consider all the illegals coming in and its a mess. Its a sad day in America when we spend millions fighting illegal drug lords and very poor 3rd world folks with no education or job skills sneaking into our country and using our public services,education and healthcare. In some cases they are voting.
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    Nov 04, 2010 3:20 AM GMT
    beaujangle said
    Tazo995 said
    reppaT saidWhy do you want to become an American citizen? The grass isn't greener here.


    Oh yes it is. I'd chop off my pinky finger for it. And I'm sure I'm not the only one, but coming to the US is my one big dream.



    I'm curious, what's your fascination of coming to the US? I have mine but what's yours?


    First of all I have a job there, I've been working it from abroad for almost 2 years now cause I don't qualify for an H1B visa, and I'd like to just work at the office and be with my coworkers.

    Then I have lots of friends there, I love southern Cali where the office is (Santa Monica), in general I just like America, I have way more in common with it than with my socialist European country of birth and just feel at home there.

    As of now I can go to the office once or twice a year and spend a maximum of 90 days there. I have my job, my friends, lots of activities, basically a life... and then every time I'm torn away from it all and have to fly out, and then readjust to life in another place again. It's just pissing me off.

    I also wanna set up a business and go chase my American dream. I've set up the business (in Delaware) but the reality is that it's rather hard to work with clients if you're outside the country.

    So that's my fascination with it... I just want my American dream like everybody else. And I can't have it. Story of my life icon_cry.gif
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    Nov 04, 2010 3:41 AM GMT
    Ive been in the USA for >4 years from Canada (I'm Canuck by birth). I had no ties and no thoughts of coming here, but one day I just had a hunch I wanted to move to the American West Coast. I applied to the school system and transferred for the remaining 2 years. Its a little costly as an international school, but I sorta knew what I was doing.

    After 2 years I applied for work with my degree and got a job in San Diego within a week of applying- which has turned to be my dream job (for now). They didn't even flinch about giving me a greencard (my employer). I have a dual degree in pharma development and biochemistry, which helps in socal.



    Other examples of young people I've met here in Cali/Oregon/Washington, that were from Canada. One of my friends finished Engineering at UW (waterloo) and got hired directly by Qualcomm (and given GC).

    Another random example:
    One day I walked into the Starbucks by the beach where I often hang out, this employee recognized my accent (who knew Torontonians had one); she told me she just moved here from Toronto and given a green card by Starbucks to become store manager. Ironically she previously worked at a store that I frequented often while living in Toronto (If I had been straight this might have been fate). She didn't finish college,and is ~24 years old, so you dont always need some advanced degree---but it helps.

    There are many ways and in no means do these have to take a long time. It hasn't for me, nor for the 2 examples above.

    Also San Diego job market is pretty saturated, and it was still easy for young people with definite niches to get jobs even in this economy. Try your luck and find your path, stay positive.

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    Nov 04, 2010 3:45 AM GMT
    reppaT saidWhy do you want to become an American citizen? The grass isn't greener here.


    If its not so green then why are you still here? icon_wink.gif


    Personally, i absolutely LOVE america and very proud to say i live in america and proud to say we are the best country on earth. Also, no i dont feel i am better than others its just i have a deep love for america and how people from around the globe have found their dream in america. God bless this place.
  • hyperionx

    Posts: 232

    Nov 04, 2010 3:52 AM GMT
    Jonno11 saidon the contrary, for me the grass wud be very much greener in the form of an adorable young child and a loving partner. and i might have found a loophole in the laws already that wud allow me to go down there no questions asked, other than a judge to sign off, so here's hoping once my training up here is done, i can hop in my truck and be Florida bound.


    It sounds like you have very specific reasons for doing this.

    You can be in the United States without working visa-free for up to six months in a calendar year. Even if you did have a visa or a green card, you still aren't afforded the rights and privileges of citizenship either, not that the privileges are that great given the circumstances of gay rights in the U.S.

    In Canada you have equal rights, health care, everything you need to start your own business and go on with your life professionally. It sounds like it's a personal reason; is it big enough for you to emigrate?
  • beaujangle

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    Nov 04, 2010 4:29 AM GMT
    Another random example:
    One day I walked into the Starbucks by the beach where I often hang out, this employee recognized my accent (who knew Torontonians had one); she told me she just moved here from Toronto and given a green card by Starbucks to become store manager. Ironically she previously worked at a store that I frequented often while living in Toronto (If I had been straight this might have been fate). She didn't finish college,and is ~24 years old, so you dont always need some advanced degree---but it helps.

    There are many ways and in no means do these have to take a long time. It hasn't for me, nor for the 2 examples above. [/quote]


    Your stories are indeed very different from the other posts and from what I've heard and read elsewhere. So does luck come in?
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    Nov 04, 2010 4:41 AM GMT
    beaujangle saidAnother random example:
    One day I walked into the Starbucks by the beach where I often hang out, this employee recognized my accent (who knew Torontonians had one); she told me she just moved here from Toronto and given a green card by Starbucks to become store manager. Ironically she previously worked at a store that I frequented often while living in Toronto (If I had been straight this might have been fate). She didn't finish college,and is ~24 years old, so you dont always need some advanced degree---but it helps.

    There are many ways and in no means do these have to take a long time. It hasn't for me, nor for the 2 examples above.



    Your stories are indeed very different from the other posts and from what I've heard and read elsewhere. So does luck come in?[/quote]


    Well I'm not going to lie, I've been with a lot of Irishmen.
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    Nov 04, 2010 4:56 AM GMT
    Since I've been in the Air Force, I think the fastest route for most young men and women is to enlist/commission in a branch of our military.

    Might not offer the best options in the means of personal freedom but after 4 years and you have your citizenship you say to hell with uncle Sam and do what your heart desires.
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    Nov 04, 2010 5:10 AM GMT
    Ricovelas saidSince I've been in the Air Force, I think the fastest route for most young men and women is to enlist/commission in a branch of our military.

    Might not offer the best options in the means of personal freedom but after 4 years and you have your citizenship you say to hell with uncle Sam and do what your heart desires.


    I actually thought about that, but also dismissed the thought rather quickly... I'm 24 right now, if I'd do a 4 year army tour I'd be pushing on 29, and will have lost the fun part of life in which you build the foundations for your later career, it doesn't seem like a very good strategic move.

    Oh yea, and I'm gay.