GAY IN AMERICA(Color Lines Across Rainbow Skies)

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 24, 2010 12:57 PM GMT
    The Racial & Ethnic Divide In The LGBT Community








  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 24, 2010 3:58 PM GMT
    Anyone have any Opinions or would like to share something?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 24, 2010 5:58 PM GMT
    I think watching 40 minutes of video is a bit much...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 24, 2010 6:03 PM GMT
    Crist on a cracker
  • gjoseph

    Posts: 250

    Oct 24, 2010 6:27 PM GMT
    Such an interesting video....I have had a couple of experiences alike to those being interviewed (Being too "fem", Guy stating I'm cute but would look better with lighter skin). Glad to see such "taboo" areas being brought up, I kinda wish the director brought up classism in the LGBT community however, all of the issues that were brought up affects American society in general.

    GREAT video OP!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 24, 2010 6:41 PM GMT
    I watched and wondered why the OP posted it. This is old news. Overall I thought the series was weak. It's a collection of personal accounts without any depth or placed against a broader look at societal patterns or habits. I understand what the producer is trying to explain, but this is not groundbreaking material.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 24, 2010 6:54 PM GMT
    It's something that I never really thought about until I dated a black guy who was an african-american studies major. It's a complicated issue ... for all sides. I was brought up to never see people for the color of their skin, but as a white male, I understand that I have that privilege due to perceived social hierarchy.

    I also have the benefit of living in the SF bay area, which has an IMMENSELY diverse population, so after awhile all the racial boundaries kind of fall away. I went home a few Christmases ago, and my brother and I were at a mall in Appleton, WI. I started having this really unsettling feeling, and I couldn't put my finger on it. After 30 minutes of feeling uncomfortable, I realized that I was in a place with thousands of people who were all white and all speaking English ... and I hated it. It seemed creepy and assimilationist.

    Unfortunately, that's their norm. So, when they're confronted with people of different races, I'm sure they're just as uncomfortable as I was (if not more). Fear is usually based in the unknown.

    I've learned to stop trying and know people for who they are, not what they are. My ex-boyfriend is now one of my best friends, so we spend pride together in SF and we went to black gay pride in Oakland.

    I don't think people should ignore any racial boundaries that might exist within our community or our country, but I think we should do our best to ignore any reactions we may have when it comes to judging someone based on their race. icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 24, 2010 7:07 PM GMT
    FierceEyes saidIt's something that I never really thought about until I dated a black guy who was an african-american studies major. It's a complicated issue ... for all sides. I was brought up to never see people for the color of their skin, but as a white male, I understand that I have that privilege due to perceived social hierarchy.

    I also have the benefit of living in the SF bay area, which has an IMMENSELY diverse population, so after awhile all the racial boundaries kind of fall away. I went home a few Christmases ago, and my brother and I were at a mall in Appleton, WI. I started having this really unsettling feeling, and I couldn't put my finger on it. After 30 minutes of feeling uncomfortable, I realized that I was in a place with thousands of people who were all white and all speaking English ... and I hated it. It seemed creepy and assimilationist.

    Unfortunately, that's their norm. So, when they're confronted with people of different races, I'm sure they're just as uncomfortable as I was (if not more). Fear is usually based in the unknown.

    I've learned to stop trying and know people for who they are, not what they are. My ex-boyfriend is now one of my best friends, so we spend pride together in SF and we went to black gay pride in Oakland.

    I don't think people should ignore any racial boundaries that might exist within our community or our country, but I think we should do our best to ignore any reactions we may have when it comes to judging someone based on their race. icon_smile.gif


    Like Button!
  • groundcombat

    Posts: 945

    Oct 24, 2010 7:23 PM GMT
    I think I was slightly put off/intimidated by the 40 minute length as well.
  • MarvelClimber

    Posts: 511

    Oct 24, 2010 7:30 PM GMT
    I watched all four videos. Although I agree that there is internal segregation in the gay community, I don't think the interviewer did a good job of presenting a wide variety of perspectives. He specifically sought out people who bolstered his point and made no qualifier that their opinions were localized. I also found some of his questions to be leading. Everyone was in NYC. I think some background on the interviewees would have been good to include, such as where they are from. Only one interviewee described the gay scene in another area, but even that was in another gay mecca.

    The way the interviewer set up his piece, the takeaway concludes that blacks and latinos prefer just as much to stick with their own. The problem is, most minorities don't have that luxury across the US because the density of diverse cultures is much lower in other cities compared to NYC. Despite all other factors that influence how people become paired (education, income, interests, age/maturity), race is the natural principle factor? I DON'T THINK SO!
  • mybud

    Posts: 11837

    Oct 24, 2010 7:30 PM GMT
    My view true love is color less....Listen.... in every relationship your gonna have struggles...If your loyalty and love is strong...you become a united front against any prejudice others throw at ya....BUD
  • samronvi

    Posts: 2

    Oct 24, 2010 7:36 PM GMT
    This was really cool. I want a serious relationship with a bi-racial guy and this opens a lot a questions. I dated a few Biracial guys before from Europe whose countries have a few or rarely any blacks. We had excellent relationships. I think the end factor comes down to the two of you alone. Nothing is stronger than love and to hell with what anybody thinks. The world would also be racial but we cannot sit around and wonder when it will end. Just go out and find your love whether he/she is black, white, red or orange.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Oct 25, 2010 2:40 AM GMT
    I honestly hate the discrimination in general. I understand if you don't like someone if they were to give you a reason not to, but to judge someone before you know them or just by the color of their skin, sexuality, etc, is just ignorant and stems from the same shit that got us here in the first place.

    It's not very smart, I'm a fairly diverse person, I am sexually attracted to a lot of races haha so I don't care what you are, just getting to know someone is what makes it better.