Brain Takes Less Than Second to Fall in Love

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    Oct 27, 2010 1:06 AM GMT
    Brain Takes Less Than Second to Fall in Love

    http://news.discovery.com/human/brain-takes-less-than-second-to-fall-in-love.html

    A recent study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to see how love affects the brain. Its calculations of love has attracted plenty of
    attention.

    For example, the time taken to "fall in love" clocks in at about one-fifth of a second, not the six months of romantic dinners and sharing secrets some might expect.

    Also, 12 areas of the brain work together during the love process, releasing euphoria-inducing chemicals like dopamine, oxytocin, adrenaline and vasopressin. Love's high is similar to cocaine's rush.

    Love influences sophisticated intellectual processes of the brain too. When a person feels in love, their mental representation, metaphors and even body image are also affected.

    Researchers from Syracuse University, West Virginia University and the Geneva University Psychiatric Center retrospectively reviewed pertinent neuroimaging literature. They published their findings in a recent issue of the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

    Overall, they found, love is really good for you.

    Couples who had just fallen in love had significantly higher levels of nerve growth factor, or NGF. NGF is crucial to the survival of sympathetic and sensory neurons. Some believe NGF can reduce neural degeneration. Not a bad side effect.

    Just as love is diverse, the part of the brain affected is also different.

    Unconditional love, the type often seen between a mother and child, lights up the common and different brain areas, including the middle of the brain.

    Not surprisingly, passionate love fires the reward part of the brain, but it also affects the higher-order cognitive function seen in body image.

    A follow-up study about the speed of love in the human brain is expected to follow soon.
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    Oct 27, 2010 1:08 AM GMT
    AvadaKedavra saidBrain Takes Less Than Second to Fall in Love

    http://news.discovery.com/human/brain-takes-less-than-second-to-fall-in-love.html

    A recent study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to see how love affects the brain. Its calculations of love has attracted plenty of
    attention.

    For example, the time taken to "fall in love" clocks in at about one-fifth of a second, not the six months of romantic dinners and sharing secrets some might expect.

    Also, 12 areas of the brain work together during the love process, releasing euphoria-inducing chemicals like dopamine, oxytocin, adrenaline and vasopressin. Love's high is similar to cocaine's rush.

    Love influences sophisticated intellectual processes of the brain too. When a person feels in love, their mental representation, metaphors and even body image are also affected.

    Researchers from Syracuse University, West Virginia University and the Geneva University Psychiatric Center retrospectively reviewed pertinent neuroimaging literature. They published their findings in a recent issue of the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

    Overall, they found, love is really good for you.

    Couples who had just fallen in love had significantly higher levels of nerve growth factor, or NGF. NGF is crucial to the survival of sympathetic and sensory neurons. Some believe NGF can reduce neural degeneration. Not a bad side effect.

    Just as love is diverse, the part of the brain affected is also different.

    Unconditional love, the type often seen between a mother and child, lights up the common and different brain areas, including the middle of the brain.

    Not surprisingly, passionate love fires the reward part of the brain, but it also affects the higher-order cognitive function seen in body image.

    A follow-up study about the speed of love in the human brain is expected to follow soon.


    Yes, yes and there is only numerous studies suggesting otherwise....
  • commoncoll

    Posts: 1222

    Oct 27, 2010 2:39 AM GMT
    Could the MRI differentiate between lust and love?
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    Oct 27, 2010 3:37 AM GMT
    AvadaKedavra said

    Also, 12 areas of the brain work together during the love process, releasing euphoria-inducing chemicals like dopamine, oxytocin, adrenaline and vasopressin. Love's high is similar to cocaine's rush.


    Nerd rage from midtermsicon_exclaim.gif
    Oxytocin - important for stretch receptors in cervix; in males, causes proliferation of cells in prostate.
    Dopamine - released from the arcuate nucleus - used to inhibit prolactin.
    vasopressin - also called argenine vasopressin - AVP, released from supraoptic nucleus and paraventricular nucleus; with CRH, it helps release ACTH which goes to the adrenal cortex and releases cortisol. Increases blood glucose and blood pressure.

    *Bangs head on table*icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Oct 27, 2010 4:27 AM GMT
    Plaisir d'amour ne dure qu'un moment,
    Chagrin d'amour dure toute la vie~
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    Oct 27, 2010 6:26 AM GMT
    commoncoll saidCould the MRI differentiate between lust and love?


    No clue. I just find it interesting that scientist do so many interesting studies.