Mac v PC

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 10, 2008 2:29 PM GMT
    So I am in the market for a new laptop. Despite my tech savvy, I am pretty naive in the world of Mac. I plan to use my Mac for freelance work with MSFT office, but otherwise will use it for music mixing, production and other creative things.

    I know a lot of people have opinions in the Mac v PC battle. I wondered if anyone could share some insight that might help me make up my mind.

    thanks
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 10, 2008 4:08 PM GMT
    The playing field between both is essentially level these days. It's really just a matter of preference. Each OS has it's pluses and minuses.

    I prefer Windows because I find it to be more versatile. I've used it for audio mixing and graphic design, and it's been great. I had also built my computer itself, so that helped.

    Test out both systems and decide...that's the best way.

    Good luck!

    Joe

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 10, 2008 4:46 PM GMT
    I'll chime in here real quickly. I love my Macs. I'm on my sixth now, a black MacBook I've had for nearly a year. It pretty much rocks, and I've always like the Mac user environment much better than Windows. That said...if you go Mac, just be aware that the current generation of MacBooks and MacBook Pros are experiencing a higher-than-usual rate of hard drive failure. Mine just blew up two weeks ago. It's all covered under warranty, but the service guys said they've seen it happen a lot recently due to supplier quality control. Still, in the decade and a half I've been a Mac user, it's the first real problem I've ever experienced.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 10, 2008 7:49 PM GMT
    It used to be that if you were into editing video/audio and graphic design the Mac was better. Now it's about the same, although Mac's might have a slight edge in creating media while PC's seem better at playing it all back in a neat package (MediaCenter in Vista). For me it's a toss up since I use both.

    For general PC's I'd recommend Sony, Acer or Dell (in that order).
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 10, 2008 7:52 PM GMT
    As a musician, there is much more available to you on Mac. GarageBand comes free, and Logic 8 blows Pro Tools away (although Pro Tools also runs on Mac). Neither Logic or GB are available for Windows.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 10, 2008 7:55 PM GMT
    Third-party applications are much harder to find for Mac. The great thing about Mac, however, is Parallels Desktop and Bootcamp...which allows you to use your Mac AS a PC, if you cannot fully commit to the Mac.

    However, I'm sticking with my PC for awhile (I need my third-party apps way too much).
  • kinetic

    Posts: 1125

    Mar 10, 2008 8:00 PM GMT
    I luv my mac!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 10, 2008 8:15 PM GMT
    Well I've had both (and a few SGI workstations thrown into the mix.) In the end, I use the whine-doze boxes to run a couple of specialized DAC programs for which there is no alternative (except writing one my own damned self - which isn't likely to happen.) For anything useful, I use macs.

    A couple of telling points:

    I've been working on collaborative projects which require us all to come together once a year or so and do some work. Those with macs get right to work. Those with windows boxes spend the first two days trying to get their laptops to network. (And these people are engineers and Ph.D.s.) As the project goes on, there are fewer and fewer whine-doze and more macs.

    A few years back, I was napping in an auditorium at the AAAS meeting, where Bill Gates was preparing to give a keynote presentation. (He demonstrated an early prototype of video chat software.) He spent most of his prep time trying to mask the video projector to conceal the fact that he was using a mac.
  • kinetic

    Posts: 1125

    Mar 10, 2008 8:17 PM GMT
    I'm sure that was a humbling experience for him!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 10, 2008 8:21 PM GMT
    MAC is, by far, the superior machine, by virtually any measurement you apply. However,...the killer apps...still run on on Windoze, for a long variety of historical, and current, reasons.

    For what you are doing DJ, once you make the transition to the MAC, likely, you'll never look back.

    Windows is faulty out of the box. You deserve better.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19138

    Mar 10, 2008 8:31 PM GMT
    Once you go MAC, you'll never go back
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 10, 2008 8:51 PM GMT
    It depends on what you mean by "mix music" but for music production the Mac is a bit better.

    I disagree with the above comment on Logic being better than Pro Tools. Logic is by far better if you are dealing with straight midi and software instruments but if you plan on doing any analog recordings Pro Tools is still better at that. That said I have gone with a Logic set up. The price cut that came with Logic Studio got me.

    As far as other media production goes it depends on what you are looking at. For video production it is hard to beat Final Cut Express or Final Cut Pro, Flash and Photoshop are both equally capable on both Mac and Win and for photography the two big apps (Lightroom and Aperture) are both on a Mac with only one being available for Windows.

    Personally I use a Mac for both work and personal use and have never owned anything but a Mac. So I might have a slight bias.
  • klinci3

    Posts: 60

    Mar 10, 2008 9:15 PM GMT
    I have both a mac and a PC and I prefer to use the Mac because it runs much faster sense there isn't any spyware or viruses to slow it down, also i use final cut pro for movies which you can have pre-installed on a mac and works wonders.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 10, 2008 9:34 PM GMT
    webinfront said
    I disagree with the above comment on Logic being better than Pro Tools. Logic is by far better if you are dealing with straight midi and software instruments but if you plan on doing any analog recordings Pro Tools is still better at that. That said I have gone with a Logic set up. The price cut that came with Logic Studio got me.


    Just wanna say that I disagree. Logic 8 way surpassed Pro Tools, do a search on google, many reviews have corroborated this. I agree. But everyone will have their preference, obviously.
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Mar 10, 2008 10:00 PM GMT
    I've used both systems for nearly two decades (starting back when Macs were instead Apple IIG), often because I've been required to use one in an academic environment while using a different one for my personal machine.

    By most comparisons of what you get for your given dollar, the two operating systems are extremely close to each other. For the average consumer, the available Macs are more powerful, but also pricier, so in a bang for buck comparison, the two are virtually equivalent.

    Your specific uses can end up altering the equation. If you plan on doing a lot of light UNIX work without actually delving into becoming a hardcore UNIX programmer, the Mac can be a superior choice, as its OS is Unix based. I've heard from a number of people who do large amounts of video editing that the Mac also outperforms the PC in that arena. Conversely, there are many more third-party applications and software packages available for the PC than there are for the Mac, in large part because the PC has such a larger market share.

    There is no denying that there are more viruses written for the PC than for the Mac. What's not actually clear is how much of that is due to inherently superior security of the Mac OS, and how much of it is due to the fact that as there are many more PCs around, they represent a more tempting target. If you have a continually-on internet connection, though, it takes seconds to configure a PC to automatically check for security updates daily and install any detected, so that is less of an issue than it used to be.

    At the end of the day, your best bet is probably to find a pair of friends, one with each OS, who each have a fairly recently computer running their choice. Try to figure out how to use the computer to do what you see yourself doing regularly. Most likely, one of the two systems will be more intuitive for you. That's true for most people, though it's very difficult to predict which OS will feel more intuitive for a given user.

    Oh, and for the record--I prefer my PC to having to use a Mac. But I will freely admit that I despise the 2007 version of Office. In my opinion, Microsoft really messed up badly on that one, and very few of the controls are in places that make any intuitive sense to me anymore. The basic XP environment still makes more sense to me than the Leopard environment does, but I'm much less happy with Word and Excel and PowerPoint than I used to be.
  • EricLA

    Posts: 3461

    Mar 10, 2008 10:07 PM GMT
    I converted to a Mac about almost two years ago. I'd been using them at work for several years, but had a PC at home until the hard drive crashed. A couple things stopped me from buying a Mac earlier:

    1) all my archival files were all on PC
    2) I like to play PC games once in a while, and there's more to choose from than on a Mac

    That all changed when Macs changed to Intel processors. Now I have a Windows partition that I can use either natively or virtually (while in the Mac OS). I still have access to my PC documents, and I can still use my games, but I use my Mac for everything else. Sometimes I don't use my Windows partion for weeks at a time, but it's still nice to have it.

    Once you get used to using a Mac, and I'd say the learning curve is pretty fast, I think you'll find -- in general -- it's a FAR more intuitive system than Windows. I also find it much more stable than the PCs I have owned.

    Sure you can get a PC cheap, but you generally get what you pay for. When you truly compare a Mac to a similar PC, I think you'll find they match up pretty evenly.

    One defining factor to me was how the two approach their OS. Even before Vista, I felt Windows was loaded with a lot of bloated things I just never needed or wanted, and that they made it hard to remove. And I just feel they don't put as high a priority on security as they should. Macs just look and run smooth. And each release seems to give me what I want, even before I know I want it.

    I'm sure if you do get a PC that you won't keep Vista on it, that you'll load XP back onto it, but you shouldn't HAVE to do something like that in my opinion. And don't just take my word for it. Go to a lot of the PC magazine sites and search for Apple OS X reviews (along with reviews from the NY Times and other mainstream media sites) and many them freely admit Apple's far superior operating system. I think the evidence cleary points the way to a Mac, especially if you're using it for the creative endeavors you mention.
  • NYCguy74

    Posts: 311

    Mar 10, 2008 10:14 PM GMT
    I went mac about 2 years ago, and it's been great.

    For most stuff i use mac, but there are a few work related programs that are windows only, for those i have boot camp and parallels installed.

    With boot camp things run a bit faster in windows, but you have to completely shut down and reboot to get to it.

    with parallels, it runs windows almost seamlessly with mac's OS X. although for graphics heavy stuff parallels doesn't work well. and i would reccommend at least 2Gb of memory since it will be split between windows and mac. which is only a problem on the very base macbook. (don't by the upgrade from apple, get it on your own, you'll save money)

    you also can now run parallels or boot camp using the same installation of windows. so depending on what you need to do with windows is how you boot it.

    Mac hardware is typically more expensive, but it holds it's resale value. I just got a new MacBook Pro. I'm planning on eBay-ing my old one, and should get about $1000 for it, around half of what i payed for it almost 2 years ago. Was nothing wrong with the old one just basically got a newer/faster machine for about 1/2 price once i sell the old one.
    If you know a student or someone who works a college, there is an educational discount. and employees of most bigger corporations also can qualify discounts. It still won't be as cheap as a PC though.

    also parallels is $80, and you need also need a copy of windows to do the install, so depending on how honest you are or if you have a license you can use, from $0 to whatever a copy of that costs.

    also for bootcamp you must have an XP service pack 2 disk. so you have to have a more recent copy.

    and as far as office goes check out http://www.openoffice.org/. It has most of the features of MS office, but is open source (ie free or donation ware). currently you have to install another program to get it to work on mac ( called X11), but they are working on that.
    It also runs on windows, so you can have free office without having to steal it.

    plus the mac hardware is just sexier. and you'll look smarter with one.
    and also, not that it matters, but Justin Long,
    JustinLong01.jpg
    or John Hodgeman?
    hodgman_1.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 11, 2008 10:44 AM GMT
    Why not dual OS? Heh

    One of my friends, a professional 3d artist regularly switches from Mac to Windows to Linux on his computer. But then again, it's a desktop. icon_confused.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 11, 2008 3:53 PM GMT
    Been lurking. First post!

    I've been on a Mac exclusively (work and home) for a little over two years. I've been using a Mac at home for almost 5. I absolutely LOVE my Mac. It never gets shut off at home. Ever. The only reason I turn it off is if I'm restarting after installing an update or new software that requires it. It is stable beyond belief. And even though it's not as current as the new processors it still runs unbelievably fast. At work, I restart my machine every night before I leave, but this is because I run processor and RAM intensive programs all day and performance does start to degrade IMO if left indefinitely. Granted it would take a while, but it's kind of my little ritual at the end of the day.

    One person noted that if you get a PC, you'll want to get XP and put that on in place of Vista. You might run into the same thing if your machine comes with Leopard out of the box. Tiger has proven to be a MUCH more reliable OS than Leopard, but then again, anytime Apple releases a new OS (almost every 2 years) there's problems with it in the beginning. I typically hold off the first 6 months for them to get some of the kinks that show up worked out.

    Now that the processors are intel based, There really is no reason to not get one if you're entertaining the thought. You can run a Windows partition and keep all your old software if you need. But honestly, I think you'll find that there are many many software choices that are either equivalent or better than their Windows counterparts.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 11, 2008 5:22 PM GMT
    Thanks for all the feedback. I went and got a Mac last night and am figuring the ins and outs. I think my biggest challenge will be assimilating to the simplicity. I have worked in tech PR and have been a slave to my PC. I will still likely work on a PC, but will have to bridge the gap when I get home. juggling two operating systems may become confusing, but I am gonna give it a whack!

    Looks like I will need MSFT Office. Indusrty standard I can't live with out.

    thanks for all the help!

    B
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 11, 2008 5:55 PM GMT
    Enjoy your new Mac! I'm sure you'll love it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 11, 2008 6:03 PM GMT
    The good news is...Sean Cody is now available on Mac. I'm sure you'll rest easier with that in mind...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 11, 2008 6:24 PM GMT
    If you got a MacBook Pro, be aware that the screen is incredibly sensitive - be really, really careful with it because Mac will not cover screen damage under warranty. And it's easily breakable - those genius boys tell me it can crack sitting inside your carry-on luggage if there's turbulence on the plane!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 11, 2008 6:41 PM GMT
    I'm a computer geek (professionally) and use both. Have always been a PC guy, grew up on them, know them inside and out. Use a Mac occasionally, but recently a lot more. Taking a Mac class this week (part of work) and I would strongly recommend the Mac.

    The new OS Leopard is great, many things included, lots of freebies to download. Unless you're using some speciality software that does not work on a Mac, I'd go with the Intel chip based Mac. You can load XP on a separate partition and always reboot it into the PC if you really needed it. Sounds like most that do that, hardly ever use the PC side.


  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 11, 2008 6:43 PM GMT
    now if I could only get my cam on this thing to work in RJ....icon_twisted.gif